36

This sounds like undesirable behaviour to me. Here are the main problems in my mind: The cat could fall into the tank, damage the terrapin or tank, splash water on an electrical appliance, etc. Terrapins are known for being nippy. If it nips your cat you could open yourself up to any number of issues for both parties. The water in your fish tank may not be ...


22

It is actually not uncommon for fish to disappear, seemingly without a trace. It has happened to me a few times. Sometimes you eventually find out what happened, sometimes you don't. There are several things that could have happened to it. Each of these things has happened to my fish at some point in the past. It might be hiding. Some fish are really ...


19

Ich Ichthyophthirius multifiliis (Source: aquariacentral.com) Ich is an tiny ectoparasite that can harm fish if they succumb to it. If not cared for properly, it can kill fish. It's important to note that ich is always present, and there is nothing you can do to get rid of it. Fish are naturally immune to ich, and only succumb to it when their immune ...


18

Amano shrimp are good tank mates for community fish. They'll ignore your fish altogether. And they eat algae 24x7, which never hurts. Amano shrimp require brackish water for breeding, so won't breed in most tanks. This also makes them difficult to find. Cherry shrimp (and their color varieties) will also be no threat to your fish. But, they are very ...


17

The cat might also like the taste of the water. Some animals are quite the connoisseurs. My dog prefers to drink "old" water from a big basin standing outside, one cat enjoys licking up the water puddles beneath my flower pots and the other cat prefers fresh tap water. The chemistry of tap water differs so much from aquarium water that even you ...


15

This is a good example of overstocking a fish tank. Don't feel too bad about it, I don't know anyone who didn't overstock their tank the first time. It's just too tempting. Here's the problem though... Fish waste contains ammonia, which is toxic to fish. Which wouldn't be a problem for them in a lake or river, but we keep them in a glass box. Meaning, ...


15

They sell fountains for cats. Basically, it's a water bowl (or basin) for the cat to drink from. The bowl is hooked up to a circulating system that keeps the water flowing. This is why your cat is attracted to the aquarium. Though many cats will drink still water, it's not uncommon for individual cats to be turned off by the idea. In the wild, still water ...


13

You're changing an awful lot of variables all at once, so your readings (and your nitrogen cycle) are likely way off. Slow down a bit, and let's look at the possibilities one at a time. First, most water treatments that neutralize ammonia work by converting the ammonia (NH3) into harmless ammonium (NH4+), which will by removed by your bio filters. The test ...


12

So... What I would consider/do is: Tank capacity according to the fish you already have and the size of your current tank. Bear in mind that these are rules of thumb. The species you have and the species you intend to add. I don't know what you have and what you'd like to get, but before doing so, do check. Feed the fish in your current tank before adding ...


12

These actually sound like snail eggs to me. Your tetras are egg scatterers, and lay tiny eggs hidden in rocks or thick plants growth. You can see what their eggs look like in this video -- very tiny, and not protected in a gelatinous mass like the ones you've found. (Note that your tetras are an albino or leucistic strain of the ones in the video, but the ...


12

John Cavan's advice is good. Some additional advice that I learned the hard way after many years of owning 80 and 300 litre freshwater tanks: If you don't have a working understanding of pH, it is helpful to read up on it. A precise definition of pH is unnecessary; a good way to think of it is that pH measures the amount of free hydrogen atoms in the water. ...


10

Assuming you have an appropriate filter setup and do regular water changes, this is probably fine. My caveat is that AqAdvisor treats the loaches as potentially reaching 10" (25 cm), which would be a bit large. Fishbase says the largest on record was about 6" (15 cm) though; I'm not sure which site has the better handle on that species. (Note that I picked a ...


10

Unfortunately I'd say no, not if you still have that much ammonia showing up. The rule of thumb I've seen is you should be able to add 2ppm ammonia and have it completely converted to nitrates within 24 hours. It's odd that you're seeing ammonia and nitrates at this stage: you tend to see the ammonia-consuming bacteria show up very quickly (see the graph ...


9

There are a few ways to reduce the frequency of water changes for your turtle. Just keep in mind there is no running away from water changes. Have an efficient biological filter: This very obvious way is probably the most important. I'm not particularly sure about the filter you have, but essentially in turtle tanks you want to cycle the water at least ...


8

At this stage, I would look to add fish and stop artificially adding ammonia to the system. Ideally, you want to start small, with a few hardy fish added to the tank, much less than your tank is expected to handle, and then begin adding more fish over the next few weeks as you system equalizes from the prior additions. Basically, you now want to slowly ...


8

Check your water parameters, it should have 0 ammonia, 0 nitrite. Some nitrate presence is not lethal as long as it's within the limit. Match the pH and temperature depending on the species you plan to put it. Water should not be cloudy. There should not be any bio-film forming on top of the aquarium. In case it forms, increase surface agitation. Make sure ...


8

The first, and possibly most important, thing to look at is your tank size. In my opinion, .5 gallons is way too small of a living space for 4 fish. If you have room for a larger tank, I recommend it. A bigger tank means more surface area, which means more contact with the air. The most basic way to introduce oxygen to a still body of water (such as your ...


8

Fish have cells called chromatophores that produce the pigments that give coloration or reflect light. The colour of a fish is determined in part by which pigments are in the cells (there are several colours), how many pigment molecules there are, and whether the pigment is clustered inside the cell or is distributed throughout the cytoplasm. Another thing ...


8

Looks like a damselfly larvae to me, which isn't actually a parasite. It is, however, carnivorous... If your fish were larger, this larvae could have turned into food for them, but not in this case as you have small fish. So, as it is they can be dangerous to your fish and shrimp, so best to make sure you get them out of the tanks as soon you find them. ...


8

It is very hard to get a small tank to be in biological balance and to keep the water quality good, so I suggest you use this tank only for treating your fish with medication. This can be helpful if you have to treat your fish from a larger tank because using medication in a larger tank will destroy the biological balance and create problems for your fish. @...


7

What are other good ways to identify erratic fish behavior due to environmental stress? Behaviors vary highly from fish to fish and are almost impossible to generalize, but some abnormal behavior includes: Fishes will show less activity and become lethargic. They'll stop taking food. Will hide most of the time, behind decorations, filters, heaters. They ...


7

To add some more tips I do in my aquariums: Remember to add some more food after you have inserted those new fishes. It's easy to forget and keep with the same amount, what might stress your older fishes (since there will be new mouths disputing with them) Take care with old /weak fishes: if your fishes are a bit old or aren't in good health (not just sick, ...


7

You can buy a dissolved oxygen meter, but they'll generally start in the US$200 to US$400 range, and a suitable one I believe runs closer to US$500-600. Not exactly an everyday piece of equipment for a measurement you're going to take once. There are cheaper test kits designed for other applications, but those will only get you in the approximate ball park, ...


7

Firstly, I'll go for my old refrain "consistency is key". It's better to have consistent water parameters than changing them continually to 'chase the perfect conditions'. Firstly, your nitrite should be 0 if your tank is correctly cycled. Secondly, you haven't got a reading for ammonia there (which is one of the problems with the test strips). Ammonia, as ...


6

I've never owned crabs or crayfish as pets before, but I've had success with Mosquito rasboras[1] and White Cloud Mountain minnows in a community tank with shrimp and snails. They are very pretty schooling fish and fairly tolerant to other species. The only thing I would be concerned about is the crayfish or crab feeding on the smaller schooling fish. I'll ...


6

None of the answers addresses two of the most important considerations. Quarantine your new fish after purchasing, for at least 7-15 days. This makes sure the new fish does not bring anything bad to your tank. Acclimate them by matching the water temperature, pH, TDS of their old home and the new one. This is usually achieved by adding your tank water to ...


6

In addition to making sure the new fish are a good fit for your tank, you'll want to prepare for any diseases or parasites they might come in with. These are often latent and brought out by the stress of moving, so you can't rely entirely on picking only the healthiest fish in the tank. (Though of course that's a good thing to do.) Ideally, set up a small ...


6

Let's first talk about your tank a little bit. Ammonia: Must be zero at almost all times. Your tank is having huge difficulties keeping up with bioload it seems, and that can cause a lot of issues, such as gills burning due to ammonia, there being insufficient oxygen to breathe, etc. Reflection: Fish will not see their reflection in the tank unless you ...


6

If I were to make a safe guess, it would be the tank cycle is not completed yet. If it is a matured tank, then something must have been disturbed which triggered the tank cycle to reset. If your tap water has high chlorine/chloramines, this could possibly kill the beneficial bacteria colony inside the filter. If you have washed your filter using tap water, ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible