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Ich Ichthyophthirius multifiliis (Source) Ich is an tiny ectoparasite that can harm fish if they succumb to it. If not cared for properly, it can kill fish. It's important to note that Ich is always present, and there is nothing you can do to get rid of it. Fish are naturally immune to Ich, and only succumb to it when their immune systems or protective ...


14

Oddly enough, there are some articles about it. This article, Reactions in individual fish to strobe light. Field and aquarium experiments performed on whitefish (Coregonus lavaretus), deals with strobe light and whitefish, as its title says. Their conclusion is that fish will swim away from the strobe light and don't bother if it comes from behind. Since ...


12

Don't panic, it's probably okay! The key thing here is that you caught the error and asked the question. I'll cover both bases here and try and explain a few things (forgive me if you already know them). Firstly, this is a good sized tank, so if you've only added a small amount of water, it probably won't make much difference. The dilution of the bottled ...


10

Yes, LED's can support thriving reef and fish-only saltwater tanks. Just like with traditional lighting, there are a ton of factors; including the type and quality of the LED, the color spectrum, LED lenses, the total output, and the specific requirements of the livestock. If you're looking for reef quality lighting, it's going to be at the upper end of ...


7

This answer assumes you have a deep sand bed (photos) in your aquarium. When you cycle your aquarium, it means all your micro-fauna are being built. The lower part of the sand bed should already have some anaerobic bacteria living in it. I'm not sure that it's already built up in 3 weeks, but surely it is on its way. When you move items to a new aquarium, ...


5

Depending on what type of tank you have, whether it's a reef or fish only, you're going to want a certain temperature of light. Normally, for a fish only tank, you're looking at a light around 5,000-6,500 Kelvin. If you have a reef tank, you'll want to have a light up to 10,000 Kelvin, but be sure to monitor it, as you don't want to harm the coral. Too much ...


5

The black one is an Ocellaris and is typically referred to as a Darwin as they're originally from a specific area in Australia. Most likely you will not be able to keep more than a pair in the tank unless it's a huge tank. Clownfish are typically very aggressive towards conspecifics, they are a type of damsel, to the point where they will pester them to ...


4

Spidercat outlined some good points, since the Ichthyophthirius multifiliis parasite is a very popular issue in aquariums i feel like adding my personal experiences as well. Causes for an outbreak: This can be but not limited to temperatures, pH and nitrite / nitrate levels, lighting, overpopulation! - environmental changes of all sorts. Anything that causes ...


4

Money The main difference between a saltwater tank and a freshwater fish tank that keeps people from getting into keeping saltwater tanks is cost. There's a big difference between losing a $3 freshwater fish and a $30 saltwater fish. The cost of setting up a new saltwater tank can get insanely expensive. Once it's started though, it's not so bad. Really ...


4

This answer is with the assumption that you are referring to a fish only marine tank, normally called a FOWLR (Fish only with live rock) tank. A coral reef tank requires considerably more skill and husbandry than a FOWLR tank, but biologically speaking, fish tanks all work the same way regardless of the salinity of the water. Filtration The biological ...


4

Brine shrimps are non-selective filter feeders and can be fed a wide range of foods, including but not limited to Liquidfry brand or similar fry food, yeast, whey, wheat flour, soybean powder, fish meal and egg yolk. For maximum results, your Brine Shrimp should have food available 24/7. At the same time, you don't want to flood the container with so much ...


4

I have gained a bit of experience since then as well as had an unfortunate Act of Poseidon that has granted me a mulligan on clownfish. I'll share my insight. Many factors come in to play when determining the aggression of a fish: Their Natural Temperament This is typically rated as non-aggressive, semi-aggressive, or aggressive (some use the word bold). ...


4

Hard to tell from the picture, but most likely some sort of sponge or tunicate. They typically grow naturally when there is sufficient food and nutrients and with a few exceptions shouldn't be a problem. Here's a quick guide to common hitchhikers: http://www.xtalworld.com/Aquarium/hitchfaq.htm Sponges come in just about any color and shape, the most common ...


4

First, as Henders says, this is almost certainly not an issue at all. But I would continue to use tank water to thaw the krill from here on out. In fact, I'd go a step further: you can put the tank water and krill in a small tupperware container and float that in the tank for several minutes. This not only thaws the krill, but gets it to the same ...


4

It is a caulerpa algae, although it has roots, stems and leaves ( may be prolifera or floridiana ). Tangs, Moorish Idols and other fish eat it. It grew very vigorously in my aquariums and so can shade or choke out corals IF not trimmed. In a 75 and a 55 I grew enough to supply a couple independent pet shops. As you note, it should look very bright green.


3

Very small salt water tanks are pretty difficult to maintain. Properly hating/cooling a tank that small is always a challenge--most heaters aren't adequate enough to maintain a stable temperature in such a small tank, and you might need to wind up investing in a chiller as well. All tanks deal with evaporation, but in a tank that small you have to monitor ...


3

As a practice, and to train your fish to know when food is going to be dropped, you should turn off the filter, skimmer, and all equipment which makes noise or bubbles, or any kind of water activity. Turning off wave makers while feeding fish, is not advised if you have corals (just my opinion). Then feed the fish by dropping the food into the water. After a ...


3

It should be running continuously. Normally the sump is where the filtration and heating/cooling is located, so running it only part time would create problems for the main tank. Is the pump itself loud, or is the overflow into the pump what's making the noise?


3

The problem with treating saltwater fish is that the medicines that will kill the microorganisms that are harming the fish will also kill the microorganisms that are helpful to the tank (e.g. the ones living in the sand and corals). So to counteract that, people have resorted to taking the fish out of the tank, and treating it in a quarantine tank, or "...


3

Growth rate and how large they get depends on they environment and the genus. Many can grow to about 1" in six months or so, then continue growing from there. It is common for a lot of the baby snails to not last the long.


3

Sometimes as they start to decay or as other fish nibble at them, parts of them become small enough to get sucked into filtration. Check filter by partially disassembling it and remove any questionable chunks. Also, check filter intake to see if anything is stuck to the underside, or less visible side of the intake. Look in any caves, nooks and crannies of ...


2

I have live rock, coral, snails, crab, starfish, many other fish and invertebrates, and the led works fine. It runs cooler too. It may take more lights to get the same amount of lighting as you get from a standard lighting system (depending on the type of led setup you go for) and it can get really expensive, but it looks great.


2

Suction cups do tend to just stop suctioning over time, so a simple solution may be just buying new ones. In my experience with them, I've found that sometimes they'll only stick to the surface if it's dry, especially when I'm dealing with a plastic surface. I suggest you try drying the bucket, and then attempting to stick the suctions then. If that doesn't ...


2

the reason for not giving freshwater fish a salt water dip is this the salt water is dangerous on a cellular level for the fish due to the change of the osmotic pressure in the cells. here is a site explaining this in the part about anatomy and physiology http://fishlaboratory.com/fish/freshwater-fish-vs-saltwater-fish in freshwater fish the level of salt ...


2

It went pretty much as I expected it to, I was just afraid to take the leap with that little death trap. He was incredibly easy to catch at night when he was moving about in the open. Exposing them to air briefly is not known to cause an issue (as it does with some echinoderms Moving it to a quarantine tank for just one night would likely add unnecessary ...


2

A lot of your finer particles that need removed will float in saltwater, with the proper flow will go into the overflow. Also, said system will have a cleanup crew (crabs, pods, worms) to eat the particles that don't make it to the surface. That's what they are for. If the system contains coral, it should also have a heavy, random flow. That would assist in ...


2

For saltwater tanks it's easy: there is a lot of current in the water. If there would be any detritus, in would already be floating and it would be sucked up by the overflow. When you look at saltwater tanks, nothing is floating. So there isn't any real debris to be sucked up by a filter inlet deeper in the tank. A surface skimmer or overflow filter will ...


2

So, I'm going to assume you're curing/cycling the rock in the display tank, correct me if I am wrong here. Assuming so, I would definitely do a water change. And I think your concerns are spot on. As soon as you apply light of any reasonable intensity, you're going to almost immediately get GHA and film algae, typically followed by more nefarious algaes. ...


2

Once tangs establish territory, it can be very difficult to get them to accept any other fish being introduced to the tank. A yellow tang would have zero problem claiming even an entire 90 - 120 gallon tank, given the opportunity, so the phenomenon you're dealing with is, it's the tang's tank, and he's not wanting to allow you to invade his space with any ...


2

You should have some target amount of salt ppm per gallon of water. This amount will change depending on A: the type of salt, and B: what you actually will have in your tank. API aquarium salt claims its 1/2 tea spoon per gallon. Follow the guide on what ever salt you have, and for what ever animals you have in your tank, but lets use API as a base line. ...


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