39

The most reasonable explanation is that it died and was eaten by the other fish / snails. Note that some snails are carnivorous. Many fish are cannibalistic if the opportunity arises. Some leftovers of the missing fish might be found inside the aquarium, if you look carefully. Or in the filter. Some fish have the idea to jump out of the water. With this ...


35

Fish excrete hormones in their waste. In a confined space like an aquarium, these hormones build up and act as growth inhibitors, this is basically an evolutionary mechanism, to prevent fish from dying if they end up in a water system that is cutoff from continuous fresh water. The larger the fish, the more space and continuously replenished clean water they ...


22

It is actually not uncommon for fish to disappear, seemingly without a trace. It has happened to me a few times. Sometimes you eventually find out what happened, sometimes you don't. There are several things that could have happened to it. Each of these things has happened to my fish at some point in the past. It might be hiding. Some fish are really ...


22

Depending on the size and temperature limitations of the species, there are several ways approved by the American Veterinary Medical Association. One-step process of immersions (intentional overdose via immersion) in easily obtained (for hobbyist) solution includes: Eugenol (clove oil). Ethanol. Carbon dioxide saturated water, for most fish. It is ...


18

A lot of pet stores - particularly those dedicated to aquariums - will happily take unwanted fish off your hands. So if that ends up the case, and you can't put them in another tank, call around and see if any stores will take them. Often the fish just end up getting resold by the store. I've heard some stores may even give you store credit towards the ...


18

Amano shrimp are good tank mates for community fish. They'll ignore your fish altogether. And they eat algae 24x7, which never hurts. Amano shrimp require brackish water for breeding, so won't breed in most tanks. This also makes them difficult to find. Cherry shrimp (and their color varieties) will also be no threat to your fish. But, they are very ...


17

I would be interested in hearing her reasoning for why a turtle would enjoy living in a dirty tank. Just to be clear, the tank isn't dirty because there's an excess of dirt, it's dirty because there's an excess of rotting food and feces. Basically, the turtle is living in a toilet bowl that never gets flushed. So, why is it important to keep the tank clean ...


16

It's possible, what you're going to want to do is water-log the wood so that it sinks. If it's a small piece, you can drastically shorten the time it takes to water-log it by boiling it constantly for one to three days depending on how hard the wood is. Once the wood is waterlogged enough to sink in water it's ready. Boiling it also helps to rid the wood of ...


16

First, the turtles are eating the fish because fish are food, not friends. Turtles are omnivores and fish make up part of their natural diet. There's absolutely nothing you can do to stop it other than separating them from each other. You cannot train turtles to treat food as anything but food. You may get lucky, and have a turtle that's content with the ...


15

This is a good example of overstocking a fish tank. Don't feel too bad about it, I don't know anyone who didn't overstock their tank the first time. It's just too tempting. Here's the problem though... Fish waste contains ammonia, which is toxic to fish. Which wouldn't be a problem for them in a lake or river, but we keep them in a glass box. Meaning, ...


14

Most male bettas will fight with anything that even remotely resembles another male in finnage or coloration. Some will attack any fish indiscriminately, regardless of its appearance. It is inherently risky to house bettas with other fish. Some bettas are too aggressive to be kept with any species, and many community species will damage the finnage of a ...


14

The first thing you want to do to battle algae is to remove excessive light. The worst is when sunlight reaches the tank. Algae can grow in very little light, so given sunlight (or even a tank light that's on for more than 12 hours), algae will be able to grow even faster. It's different for each tank, some of mine I can keep lit for almost 12 hours, others ...


14

Nearly any cover you buy or build will allow enough air to circulate. If you're concerned, you can just leave a bit more space between the water surface and the cover, but this really isn't a big deal in practice. And there are some good reasons to keep a tank covered: A cover reduces evaporation, which means you don't lose water as quickly. This can be ...


13

You're changing an awful lot of variables all at once, so your readings (and your nitrogen cycle) are likely way off. Slow down a bit, and let's look at the possibilities one at a time. First, most water treatments that neutralize ammonia work by converting the ammonia (NH3) into harmless ammonium (NH4+), which will by removed by your bio filters. The test ...


13

Don't panic, it's probably okay! The key thing here is that you caught the error and asked the question. I'll cover both bases here and try and explain a few things (forgive me if you already know them). Firstly, this is a good sized tank, so if you've only added a small amount of water, it probably won't make much difference. The dilution of the bottled ...


12

So... What I would consider/do is: Tank capacity according to the fish you already have and the size of your current tank. Bear in mind that these are rules of thumb. The species you have and the species you intend to add. I don't know what you have and what you'd like to get, but before doing so, do check. Feed the fish in your current tank before adding ...


12

Going by your pictures, no, you can't combine these fish. Please don't take this the wrong way: these tanks are much too small for the animals in them, and have inadequate filtration. Giant gouramis get huge, bigger than some cats and dogs -- you're looking at a fish that needs several hundred gallons of water. The other tank already has too many huge, ...


12

These actually sound like snail eggs to me. Your tetras are egg scatterers, and lay tiny eggs hidden in rocks or thick plants growth. You can see what their eggs look like in this video -- very tiny, and not protected in a gelatinous mass like the ones you've found. (Note that your tetras are an albino or leucistic strain of the ones in the video, but the ...


12

Distilled or reverse osmosis water does not have the minerals necessary to buffer pH. If used exclusively you will have a very unstable pH which is dangerous for fish. Spring water can vary in composition, in terms of minerals and pH, again creating an unstable environment. Bottled water can even be chlorinated. Combine this with the instability and you're ...


11

Short answer: Maybe. Bettas are often kept in community tanks. Care should be taken to avoid particularly brightly coloured or long-finned fish as this can increase the risk of aggression from the betta. Also, bettas should never be kept with other anabantoids (labyrinth fish) as aggression is nearly guaranteed between such species. Known fin-nippers should ...


11

Neon tetras will school together irrespective to the order of introduction. The new fishes may hide and not eat for the first few days, but eventually even you wont be able to differentiate them. While not necessary, try to get same sized fishes as the existing ones. Acclimate them properly. Turn the lights off after releasing them into you tank. My Neons ...


11

No, this won't work. Plecos don't eat garbage: they're often thought of as 'cleaner fish' because some species will conveniently eat algae and leftovers, and because they tend to be pretty inconspicuous, but none of them will thrive for long on detritus. The muck in your filter media is a mix of rotting food, fish poop, and bacterial growth. Even if they ...


11

Yes, LED's can support thriving reef and fish-only saltwater tanks. Just like with traditional lighting, there are a ton of factors; including the type and quality of the LED, the color spectrum, LED lenses, the total output, and the specific requirements of the livestock. If you're looking for reef quality lighting, it's going to be at the upper end of ...


11

Step 1: Quarantine the fish. Any fish still alive need to be moved into a new tank set up only for them. It doesn't need to be fancy. Just clean water, and nothing you can't stand to risk exposure to. If you notice any fungus growing on the fish, you'll need to treat them with an antifungal treatment. [Note: Antifungal treatments are very bad for ...


11

Goldfish can live for up to three hours out of water. It also depends on where your goldfish lands. If they landed somewhere moist or in the puddle of water they spilled out of their bowel, they can survive for around three hours. However, landing on a dry surface will kill them in about one hour, due to lack of breathable oxygen for their gills as well as ...


10

Unfortunately I'd say no, not if you still have that much ammonia showing up. The rule of thumb I've seen is you should be able to add 2ppm ammonia and have it completely converted to nitrates within 24 hours. It's odd that you're seeing ammonia and nitrates at this stage: you tend to see the ammonia-consuming bacteria show up very quickly (see the graph ...


10

Assuming you have an appropriate filter setup and do regular water changes, this is probably fine. My caveat is that AqAdvisor treats the loaches as potentially reaching 10" (25 cm), which would be a bit large. Fishbase says the largest on record was about 6" (15 cm) though; I'm not sure which site has the better handle on that species. (Note that I picked a ...


10

A sump is basically just a low reservoir that collects water as it drains from something above it. When you hear the term used in an aquarium, it's referring to a reservoir that sits below the main display tank. Water is pumped up from the sump into the tank, and then drains via an overflow back into the sump. In a way, you can think of a sump as a something ...


9

I don't have direct experience with bettas, but I've never heard that pairs will work long-term in any male/female combination. There's research that suggests they prefer to be alone or in large groups, rather than with one other fish. From Social partner preferences of male and female fighting fish (Betta splendens), by J.L. Snekser, S.P. McRobert, and E.D. ...


9

In my experience, neons will school at all times. It doesn't matter if they came from the same batch or not. When it comes to neons, the more, the better. Even tetras of different breeds (as long as they physically look similar) will school together if there aren't enough of the same breed.


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