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9

My understanding is that this is a myth with a sort-of truth to it: Fish in undersized tanks are more likely to be stressed due to a lack of swimming space (if the species is an active swimmer), overcrowding, and poor water quality, which leads to health and feeding problems. So the growth may be stunted, but it's not something you can really consider as a ...


9

The thing is, they lived together for 8 years in a smaller tank, so that does mean that they can live together. Ideally, you would mix turtles of similar size, as that reduces some risk, but from your description I don't think there's much in the way of aggression going on here. What I do think is happening, and the larger tank is the key to having me think ...


9

After seeking advice I performed an ammonia test on the pond water and it came back at 8, which is the highest reading on the chart. This means that the water is poisonous to the fish. It turns out that I have been feeding them WAY too much - 1 cup per day, when they should have around a tablespoon. I performed a 60% water change yesterday, and the ...


8

No, goldfish do not "pair up" — not socially, and not even in breeding. Goldfish are okay in smaller numbers in aquariums, but in larger ponds, they'll do much better in schools. If you are moving the fish to a new home, try to add them to their new home all at once. This will help avoid some of the territorial behaviors which can lead to aggression. ...


8

Toxotoes answer references an article on trout studies. There's no basis for equating a study on trout with that of goldfish. Moreover, the study referenced doesn't even support the researchers hypothesis. It is true, goldfish, even when kept in good conditions, will only grow to a proportional size of their tank. Unlike other aquarium fish, goldfish ...


8

According to What Sturgeons Want, sturgeons need to be fed during winter or they will starve. Unfortunately, the amount they eat is trial-and-error: throw some pellets, wait until they eat, and track how long it took. If they quickly, throw more pellets, etc. Remember they are carnivores, so choose appropriate food; don't hope that they will eat plants ...


8

A few points to note before we get down to actual numbers: With all types of fishkeeping, it is better to understock than overstock. Extra space is not a problem, so to ensure happy, healthy fish, err on the smaller size. Your fish may even reproduce, which could be a problem if you have stocked the pond to its maximum. Do not add all your fish in the first ...


7

I had a cory catfish with a goldfish for about 5 years. They were happy together. The goldfish died and now the cory is in a larger aquarium with many fish & is still living & happy.


7

So, I'd like to address a couple of challenges first and then make a suggestion that might work. Size of Tank The ponds you currently have are basically sized for a single goldfish. The risk factor here is that more than one goldfish will overload the environment as their waste product can be toxic to them. Goldfish are very hardy and can survive in less ...


7

As @John Cavan comments (and this site too), goldfish in general need: Fancy goldfish: 3 feet long and a volume of at least 20 gallons for one goldfish. If you plan to keep more than one goldfish in your tank then add an extra 10 gallons for each additional fish. So, your pot pond has more or less 70 liters (18.5 gallons). Your pond has room for one ...


7

If you are able to spot any damage, growths, or abnormal behavior like swimming on their side or gasping for air, it would be a sign. Lethargy and disinterest in food is probably the easiest way to tell. Not sure what type of goldfish you are keeping, but unless the pots are huge, and you're providing some type of filtration, they're not very well suited ...


7

The fish should all be okay as long as the pond isn't going to freeze all the way over. I would say you don't want the pond to freeze over for more than a day or two, because carbon dioxide can build up under the ice, and new oxygen won't be able to get in. Also, since I'm pretty sure the sturgeon are still active during the winter, they will still need a ...


7

There are... The ramshorn snail is an algae eater that will tend to stick to algae unless they become starved. As wiki notes, though, they can end up being a pest in the tank rather than an aid to it if you have more than one. The nerite snails are also algae eaters, but with the added bonus that they won't breed in fresh water. The trapdoor snails are ...


6

The short answer with respect to oxygenation is any freshwater plants will do this. To explain... the oxygen from this presence is a natural byproduct of the photosynthesis and for a plant submerged in the water, it's only going to go where you want it to go. However, there are some added advantages to this cycle: Removal of carbon dioxide from the water. ...


6

It's true-ish. Goldfish don't naturally stop growing, but if their environment is poor (which is usually the case in a smaller tank), they won't be healthy and that will stop/slow their growth. There is an element of truth to this, but it is not as innocent as it sounds and is related more to water quality than tank size. When properly cared for, goldfish ...


6

I could write a book on this; in fact, there are many books on this. The short version is - Algae is beneficial to fish the same way that plants are - they convert nitrate to a usable nitrogen source for consumption with the byproduct of oxygen. This oxygenates the water and removes harmful (to fish) nitrogen compounds. This is assuming alkaline water, ...


6

Other than direct observation of the bully behaviour? Look for more general signs of distress or stress in your fish as bullying is a very stressful situation. Some common signs include: Surface gasping (usually more about oxygen in the water, so unless only one is doing it, it's not a bullying thing, but watch for it anyways). Fish doesn't eat. If the ...


6

The only estimate I keep hearing on this topic is to feed fish as much as they can eat in about five minutes. As long as the fish eat nearly everything of the food it wasn't too much. I suggest to use floating food. It makes it far easier to keep track if everything is eaten and you train your fish to search for food on the top of the pond so they are ...


6

If all the debris that would fall over your pond during the fall season (hey, I just got that!) are removed in a frequent basis (daily or twice each day), you wouldn't need it. But, in general, no one can spend that time, every day, cleaning it. And so some problems might occur: your skimmer might get clogged, and any drain that you might have in your pond ...


6

This looks like a form of Dropsy. Dropsy is a generic term for edema in fish often caused by bacterial infection. Fish get sick for all kinds of reasons, stress, oxygen level, water quality, infection and more. So in this case it sounds like you have bad water with some bug. We used to use Potassium Permanganate in tanks where fish are showing signs of ...


5

Natural bodies of water with plants, algae, and circulation are capable of handling a certain volume of organic waste from fish and wildlife via biological filtration. Artificial ponds, in order to support life in them, need to mimic natural features. Your ponds may be on the threshold of the size needed for your fish volume, but there might not be much ...


5

As far as I know, dragon-fly larvae feed with mosquito larvae, and dragon-fly adults feed with adult mosquitoes. Now, where do you get the dragon-flies from, is another question, which I cannot answer. Also, I cannot tell if you enjoy seeing dragon-flies around. Personally, I am kind of fascinated by them, I would have no problem having them in my pond- ...


4

I found this professor's explanation about what atfects oxygenation in ponds:http://www2.ca.uky.edu/wkrec/lowoxygenandpondaeration.htm Surprisingly, it suggests to me that the total depth matters more than the surface/volume ratio. In particular, ponds over 8 ft. deep can lose oxygen at lower levels in hot water.


4

If I've done my math right, those pots will probably hold a bit under 40 gallons of water (depending on the exact shape of the pot, depth of the substrate, etc.). That should be sufficient for two or three adult goldfish assuming adequate filtration. I would have concerns about temperature fluctuations given the black paint job in the sun though. As far as ...


4

Your pot has, more or less, 60 liters of water, so I'll make some analogy with a 60 liters aquarium. 1 - If you're purchasing the snails, I assume that they are those desirable, pet snails, which tend to be bigger (from 2 up to 3 inches). So one would be enough. Although most snails are hermaphrodites, they need to mate to reproduce. So, having just one ...


4

So, the short answer to that question is yes, but it's not necessarily bullying, it may actually be a natural reaction to a sick fish. Basically an attempt to avoid getting the same illness or because they're attracted to the damage. It could also be that the aggressive one is the injured one (last para). In this case, it may be acting aggressive to protect ...


4

Arowanas are notorious for jumping and in the wild will often jump out of water to catch some small insects or other prey. It's probably less likely when they're in a pond because there is nothing to spook them at the sides like there could be in a fish tank. Props to you for ensuring that it is in a reasonably sized pond. Based on the average cost of an ...


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