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15

In general, the water flowing through your filter and agitating the water to mix it may provide enough oxygenation. Most of the oxygen absorbed into water is done at the surface; bubbling air through the water actually contributes a fairly low amount to dissolved oxygen, although the bubbles moving the water around might contribute to churning the more ...


11

The usefulness of carbon in your tank is, well, debatable... there are some pros and cons, some not always grounded in good science. Anyways, the useful life of the carbon portion of the filter is about two weeks and it's good for removing any contaminants or medications you may have needed to add to the system in that time. Beyond that, the filter is less ...


11

After seeking advice I performed an ammonia test on the pond water and it came back at 8 ppm, which is the highest reading on the chart. This means that the water is poisonous to the fish. It turns out that I have been feeding them WAY too much - 1 cup per day, when they should have around a tablespoon. I performed a 60% water change yesterday, and the ...


10

A sump is basically just a low reservoir that collects water as it drains from something above it. When you hear the term used in an aquarium, it's referring to a reservoir that sits below the main display tank. Water is pumped up from the sump into the tank, and then drains via an overflow back into the sump. In a way, you can think of a sump as a something ...


9

There are a few ways to reduce the frequency of water changes for your turtle. Just keep in mind there is no running away from water changes. Have an efficient biological filter: This very obvious way is probably the most important. I'm not particularly sure about the filter you have, but essentially in turtle tanks you want to cycle the water at least ...


9

Yes, you´ll need to replace it, but only if it is saturated and you need to remove chemical components from your water. And it won´t change it´s color, nor have a specific smell (unless you´re having a hard time on your aquarium, it´ll have the same smell of the water and everything else). Charcoal (activated carbon) is used because it absorbs chemical ...


8

Oxygen is introduced into the aquarium through surface agitation. Filters which feed water back into the aquarium through some kind of waterfall like the one you linked to will agitate the water, though not as much as a decent pump and airstone (think of all those little bubbles making their way to the top of the water to pop). Without using a dissolved ...


6

The filter shouldn't matter. A proper setup shouldn't build up anything harmful that quickly. I realize that's a loaded assumption, but with a crazily out of whack bio-load, I doubt even a good filter would keep everyone safe. However, most types of filters do have the added benefit of increasing oxygen exchange. Again, that's something that under most ...


6

Depending upon the type of fish, it may be possible. Some fish are able to survive in a bit cooler water. However, there are some fish that are extremely sensitive to temperature, for example angelfish are very sensitive, and I don't think they would survive. I have had fish such as guppies and neon tetras that were able to survive for a couple days without ...


6

This looks like a form of Dropsy. Dropsy is a generic term for edema in fish often caused by bacterial infection. Fish get sick for all kinds of reasons, stress, oxygen level, water quality, infection and more. So in this case it sounds like you have bad water with some bug. We used to use Potassium Permanganate in tanks where fish are showing signs of ...


5

Natural bodies of water with plants, algae, and circulation are capable of handling a certain volume of organic waste from fish and wildlife via biological filtration. Artificial ponds, in order to support life in them, need to mimic natural features. Your ponds may be on the threshold of the size needed for your fish volume, but there might not be much ...


5

Firstly, thank you for reading about the nitrogen cycle before getting fish! That's a +1 straight away. Biofilter is a bit of a funny term, really, because all filters technically become biofilters as long as they have media that would allow beneficial bacteria to grow on it. A lot of your beneficial bacteria will also live in your substrate, if you have any,...


4

It would provide additional capacity for biological filtration, but it wouldn't likely provide any additional benefit. Basically, the nitrogen cycle works to convert ammonia to nitrite, to nitrate, and finally to nitrogen gas, the first 3 compounds being toxic to fish, with the level of toxicity decreasing in that order. The problem that we all experience ...


4

An under-gravel filter provides a fair to midling range of filtration. Depending on the amount of water flow and depth of the gravel above the grid, changes how much true filtration you get with an UGF. They can also be a bit of an issue with live plants, depending on the gravel/sand mix (and other things as well) and water flow. The higher the flow rate, ...


4

A couple of weeks later, I have decided to tell you how I did it. It's been over a month since the transfer. The other two answers were good, but they simply didn't work in my case. Since the larger tank was over 5 times bigger, keeping old water wasn't really an option. You need movement in the water so it doesn't become stagnant, especially over a 2 week ...


3

Good on you for moving them to a new tank. That should give them more room. I did a similar move quite early in my fishkeeping days, and the following is a combination of what I did and things I would do differently now I have more knowledge. You have exactly the right idea in keeping the water and components the same. That should minimise the impact of the ...


3

Yes, this will be perfectly fine. Reusing the filter and substrate means you're effectively transferring the biofilter, so this is a very different scenario than moving them to a brand new setup. In fact, all you're doing here is replacing a single piece of equipment on the existing system; it just happens to be the piece that holds all the water. I'm ...


3

I strongly suggest a canister or hang on back filter. The UGF's are extremely efficient at filtering because they basically turn the entire substrate volume into a filter. However over time they trap large amounts of waste in the substrate and in the void underneath. If power is lost or flow through the filter is lost even just by their natural ability to ...


3

In a traditional freshwater aquarium filter, there are three separate parts: Mechanical, Chemical, and Biological Mechanical: This is your top sponge, it just filters out particles in the water such as uneaten food or fish waste. The people that sell fish pads are going to tell you to change it every two weeks, but you should be fine changing it every ...


3

3 weeks or so should be enough to get some of the bacteria to transfer. Note that only so much will grow in the NEW pump until the load is greater, so you will not get a full transfer from existing media regardless of how long you wait as the bacteria will stay alive in the media until it is removed. So, if you have already had the new pump connected and ...


3

If you got the fish fairly recently, the most likely answer is that they were in poor health already when you got them from the store. This is a very common issue and not all pet stores treat their merchandise the best. There can also be pre-existing issues from where they were bred/raised before being transported to the store, and the transportation itself ...


3

I don't think that it would affect pH in any way (and definitely would not raise it), but I can't find any source to back this up. But about 2-3 months ago I added Cirax to my 180 litre tank (47 gallon, Juwel Vision with the stock Juwel filter). I regularly test my pH and did not measure any difference. About 2 weeks ago I also added one of those blue ...


3

I used silicon sealant in my Oscars tank as he kept moving the heater and tank décor. As long as it's practical to lower the water level whilst you do it, it's a great permanent solution. Just be sure to buy aquarium safe sealant as domestic silicone contains algae and bacteria inhibitors, which are harmful to fish. Most fish shops sell it in small tubes but ...


3

How long the fish can stay without filtration would depend on the size of the tank and the bioload of the fish. The bioload of the tank depends on the number of fish and the size of the fish. For instance, a goldfish will create more bioload than a guppy. If you have a large tank and a small bioload. The tank can remain without filtration for many weeks. ...


3

I think Rolf has a pretty good idea, but I don't see why you have to haul them in the larger tank if it's going to be a problem. You could just get a Rubbermaid tote with a locking lid and transfer them all in that. You could even get some fish transport bags from your local fish dealer and put them in there, just like when you buy them. Either way, they're ...


3

It's just to prevent gravel from sliding into the corner when the filter is removed for maintenance or to be replaced. Without it, a person would typically need to use both hands when changing the filter, 1 to pull and hold the gravel out of the corner, and the other to insert the filter. As far as filtration functionality goes, it's irrelevant, it's just ...


3

The HAQOS EX1500 sucks water from the sectioned tube that is build into the filtration stages and goes all the way down. This filter circulates water through the stages from top to bottom. Once water reaches the bottom it's sucked up via the tube. THIS IS OPPOSITE TO SOME OTHER FILTERS IN THE MARKET. Therefore you should put carbon at the bottom, Biological ...


3

The noise from the canister indicates that the pump is still likely working but either the impeller is broken, or, that there is a blockage inside the system. The system has a filter for the input side of things which makes it unlikely that there's a solid blockage so the other possibility is an air lock. I took the canister outside and used a garden hose ...


3

Double check that decor is all smooth. Some of that also looks like it could be fin biting. Healing should be easy, just keep an eye out for rot (blackening around the edges of the wounds). Within a week new growth should begin with clear fins starting to fill back in. It should color up as normal with time. All you need to do is keep the water as clean as ...


3

Do not use kitchen sponges or other types of household sponges, they have been produced using different chemicals to make them softer and often fire resistant; this is toxic to life in water. You can get filter sponges at a pond supply shop that are made for making filters yourself; most petshops have them too, but they do often cost more there than at a ...


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