18

You should consider adding some natural pH reducing element. Adding drift woods, indian almond or oak leaves will slowly leach tannins, which in turn will reduce the pH. If you have a planted tank, you can start injecting CO2 which will also lower the pH. Another option is to filter the water through peat moss or commercially available peat granules.


13

You're changing an awful lot of variables all at once, so your readings (and your nitrogen cycle) are likely way off. Slow down a bit, and let's look at the possibilities one at a time. First, most water treatments that neutralize ammonia work by converting the ammonia (NH3) into harmless ammonium (NH4+), which will by removed by your bio filters. The test ...


13

Don't panic, it's probably okay! The key thing here is that you caught the error and asked the question. I'll cover both bases here and try and explain a few things (forgive me if you already know them). Firstly, this is a good sized tank, so if you've only added a small amount of water, it probably won't make much difference. The dilution of the bottled ...


12

First, a little background on the aquarium nitrogen cycle. Fish produce ammonia, which is extremely toxic to the fish. Unlike in a natural body of water, in an aquarium there is nowhere for this toxin to go, so it builds up fast. Luckily, there is bacteria in your tank that converts ammonia into nitrite. However, nitrite is also extremely toxic to fish. ...


10

Unfortunately I'd say no, not if you still have that much ammonia showing up. The rule of thumb I've seen is you should be able to add 2ppm ammonia and have it completely converted to nitrates within 24 hours. It's odd that you're seeing ammonia and nitrates at this stage: you tend to see the ammonia-consuming bacteria show up very quickly (see the graph ...


9

There are a few ways to reduce the frequency of water changes for your turtle. Just keep in mind there is no running away from water changes. Have an efficient biological filter: This very obvious way is probably the most important. I'm not particularly sure about the filter you have, but essentially in turtle tanks you want to cycle the water at least ...


8

Check your water parameters, it should have 0 ammonia, 0 nitrite. Some nitrate presence is not lethal as long as it's within the limit. Match the pH and temperature depending on the species you plan to put it. Water should not be cloudy. There should not be any bio-film forming on top of the aquarium. In case it forms, increase surface agitation. Make sure ...


8

The easiest way I know is to "transplant" from a good, running aquarium, so that all those desired bacteria will begin to reproduce in your aquarium and make that cycle. In the internet some people also recommend using fish to do this job (so you´d put some cheap specimens on it, knowing they would die) or using liquid ammonia. For my last aquarium, since ...


8

Double-check all your rocks: many, like limestone, have enough calcium to keep your pH high. The usual "vinegar test" is to see whether the rock fizzes when it comes in contact with a drop of acid -- vinegar or ideally stronger. If so, it's definitely affecting your pH. That said, don't worry too much if you can't get it super low. Don't assume every fish ...


8

At this stage, I would look to add fish and stop artificially adding ammonia to the system. Ideally, you want to start small, with a few hardy fish added to the tank, much less than your tank is expected to handle, and then begin adding more fish over the next few weeks as you system equalizes from the prior additions. Basically, you now want to slowly ...


7

You can buy a dissolved oxygen meter, but they'll generally start in the US$200 to US$400 range, and a suitable one I believe runs closer to US$500-600. Not exactly an everyday piece of equipment for a measurement you're going to take once. There are cheaper test kits designed for other applications, but those will only get you in the approximate ball park, ...


7

Firstly, I'll go for my old refrain "consistency is key". It's better to have consistent water parameters than changing them continually to 'chase the perfect conditions'. Firstly, your nitrite should be 0 if your tank is correctly cycled. Secondly, you haven't got a reading for ammonia there (which is one of the problems with the test strips). Ammonia, as ...


6

If I were to make a safe guess, it would be the tank cycle is not completed yet. If it is a matured tank, then something must have been disturbed which triggered the tank cycle to reset. If your tap water has high chlorine/chloramines, this could possibly kill the beneficial bacteria colony inside the filter. If you have washed your filter using tap water, ...


6

Back when we had an aquarium we just took it slow. First you fill the aquarium with sand, rocks and all other non-living decorative stuff. It is advised to wash and clean the sand before putting it in the aquarium. This reduces dust and possible contaminants that might have aggregated in the packaging process. After some hours up to a few days, after the ...


6

The pH should not change more than 0,2 during 24 hours. If it is more, it can stress your fish. The goal is to have a neutral pH of 7,0 for most fish, but this is very dependent on the type of fish you have. Some need alkaline water, other acidic water (so just about now is a good time to read about your fish and their needs). The main reason for large ...


5

I highly doubt that water change would stress her that much. However here is what you do. Prepare gigantic batch of good water, get two tubes and another empty bucket. And then use dripping method. Let water drip into the tank from the good batch of water, and out of the tank into empty bucket. This will ensure that water is changed at an extremely slow pace....


5

The first thing you need to do is to add some aquarium salt, this is done to counteract the effect of the nitrite on your fish' gills. The aquarium salt concentration to use is 0,3%. Do water changes 20% each day until the nitrite level drops, cut down on the feeding of your fish so you only feed twice a week and only a little food each time (this is to ...


4

Some signs of good water quality: The normal pH levels of 6.5-7.5; The normal temperature of around 25 degrees Celsius; no ammonia, nitrite or nitrates present; algae present in small, controlled quantities.


4

I think either one could work for you without harming the fish. You could use bottled water and treat it like tap water. Since that's basically all it is. The only problem I'd see, is if the company puts in certain minerals to enhance the taste. They could mess with the chemistry of your tank, though probably not noticeably. On the other hand, distilled ...


4

Lots of things can go wrong. Here are some ideas: pH or ammonia spike : The larger the tank, the less likely spikes are, but all of my catastrophic failures like this were due to spikes Power outage : If the power went out, all electrical components would stop functioning, like the heater, filter, aerator etc. Feeder malfunction : Especially if you haven't ...


4

First things first: your tank is not ready to house fish. When setting up a new tank, you need to cycle the water for a few weeks (typically a month or two) so beneficial bacteria can start to grow. These bacteria convert ammonia to nitrite and nitrite (which is toxic to fish) to nitrate. As long as you are seeing nitrite in your readings, cycling has not ...


4

Water changes will indeed reduce nitrate levels within your tank and with 80ppm you'll definitely want to reduce that as soon as you can. You could increase the percentage of your water changes, but one thing that I've found has helped a lot is growing a plant such as pothos (formally referred to as Pothos aureus, also commonly known as devil's ivy) in the ...


4

What I think might have happened before your koi started to die is this. As the temperature in your pond got above 20 °C, the koi eggs started to mature, and after some days of temperature still rising, the koi might have spawned (releasing the eggs into the water). Koi eggs are light green, so they can be really hard to see in the water. As these eggs ...


4

First, as Henders says, this is almost certainly not an issue at all. But I would continue to use tank water to thaw the krill from here on out. In fact, I'd go a step further: you can put the tank water and krill in a small tupperware container and float that in the tank for several minutes. This not only thaws the krill, but gets it to the same ...


4

It is indeed special in a sense that most aquarium setups include a lot of equipment, mainly a filter; the filter facilitates cultivation of nitrifying bacteria that are responsible for neutralization of harmful waste products - ammonia and nitrite. Without a filter, they would quickly build up to toxic levels and kill all animal life in the aquarium. These ...


3

The first thing I would check is the pH of the water you're using to fill the tank with. You've said that you tested it already and it was normal, but it could actually be that the water is normal as it's coming out of the faucet and then later reverting to the state it was at before. The water parameters could be affected by your plumbing, or by your local ...


3

I don't think that it would affect pH in any way (and definitely would not raise it), but I can't find any source to back this up. But about 2-3 months ago I added Cirax to my 180 litre tank (47 gallon, Juwel Vision with the stock Juwel filter). I regularly test my pH and did not measure any difference. About 2 weeks ago I also added one of those blue ...


3

It depends on the fish and depends on the pH. Normally I would say that stability is more important than a specific parameter range and I would still stick to that. I don't think many are going to have a hard time adjusting to a close to neutral pH like 7.5. However, you're talking about wild fish which do not always tolerate drastically changed conditions ...


3

You don't want to wait to see a significant spike before you start dealing with the ammonia that builds up. Ammonia is toxic to fish, and and even relatively low amounts can be harmful to them over time. So you want to test for ammonia, nitrites, and nitrates regularly at first so you know what your tank needs and when. Cycling a tank is not the same thing ...


3

You're correct about the oxygen. Warmer water dispels oxygen faster than cooler water. Sometimes the water returning from the filters is enough to add enough oxygen for fish, but sometimes it does help to add an air stone. Like you've discovered. I've heard of people keeping goldfish in the same temperature range as tropical fish, but in my opinion they ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible