20

You should consider adding some natural pH reducing element. Adding drift woods, indian almond or oak leaves will slowly leach tannins, which in turn will reduce the pH. If you have a planted tank, you can start injecting CO2 which will also lower the pH. Another option is to filter the water through peat moss or commercially available peat granules.


20

Assuming you're absolutely certain that the fish did not die from a disease or parasite (I'm not certain how you would ensure that, short of having absolutely nothing new introduced into the environment for an extended period of time prior to the death)... I would say it depends upon what died, and the other denizens of your aquarium. If you have a decent ...


13

You're changing an awful lot of variables all at once, so your readings (and your nitrogen cycle) are likely way off. Slow down a bit, and let's look at the possibilities one at a time. First, most water treatments that neutralize ammonia work by converting the ammonia (NH3) into harmless ammonium (NH4+), which will by removed by your bio filters. The test ...


13

Like any other protein-based life form, dead fish give off toxic byproducts like cadaverine and putrescene, which can be toxic in high doses. I can imagine that it's not urgent that you remove the dead fish, but letting them fester and degrade away may have toxic effects on the other fish. I don't have a reference to back that up, though. This article talks ...


13

Don't panic, it's probably okay! The key thing here is that you caught the error and asked the question. I'll cover both bases here and try and explain a few things (forgive me if you already know them). Firstly, this is a good sized tank, so if you've only added a small amount of water, it probably won't make much difference. The dilution of the bottled ...


12

John Cavan's advice is good. Some additional advice that I learned the hard way after many years of owning 80 and 300 litre freshwater tanks: If you don't have a working understanding of pH, it is helpful to read up on it. A precise definition of pH is unnecessary; a good way to think of it is that pH measures the amount of free hydrogen atoms in the water. ...


12

First, a little background on the aquarium nitrogen cycle. Fish produce ammonia, which is extremely toxic to the fish. Unlike in a natural body of water, in an aquarium there is nowhere for this toxin to go, so it builds up fast. Luckily, there is bacteria in your tank that converts ammonia into nitrite. However, nitrite is also extremely toxic to fish. ...


11

Double-check all your rocks: many, like limestone, have enough calcium to keep your pH high. The usual "vinegar test" is to see whether the rock fizzes when it comes in contact with a drop of acid -- vinegar or ideally stronger. If so, it's definitely affecting your pH. That said, don't worry too much if you can't get it super low. Don't assume every fish ...


10

Unfortunately I'd say no, not if you still have that much ammonia showing up. The rule of thumb I've seen is you should be able to add 2ppm ammonia and have it completely converted to nitrates within 24 hours. It's odd that you're seeing ammonia and nitrates at this stage: you tend to see the ammonia-consuming bacteria show up very quickly (see the graph ...


9

There are a few ways to reduce the frequency of water changes for your turtle. Just keep in mind there is no running away from water changes. Have an efficient biological filter: This very obvious way is probably the most important. I'm not particularly sure about the filter you have, but essentially in turtle tanks you want to cycle the water at least ...


9

One of the primary reasons for water changes is to remove harmful waste and chemical compounds from your tank that tend to build up over time. This is especially important in new aquariums where there aren't bacteria and an ecosystem in place to handle any of these compounds organically. There are two compounds in particular that most people target for ...


8

Check your water parameters, it should have 0 ammonia, 0 nitrite. Some nitrate presence is not lethal as long as it's within the limit. Match the pH and temperature depending on the species you plan to put it. Water should not be cloudy. There should not be any bio-film forming on top of the aquarium. In case it forms, increase surface agitation. Make sure ...


8

At this stage, I would look to add fish and stop artificially adding ammonia to the system. Ideally, you want to start small, with a few hardy fish added to the tank, much less than your tank is expected to handle, and then begin adding more fish over the next few weeks as you system equalizes from the prior additions. Basically, you now want to slowly ...


8

The easiest way I know is to "transplant" from a good, running aquarium, so that all those desired bacteria will begin to reproduce in your aquarium and make that cycle. In the internet some people also recommend using fish to do this job (so you´d put some cheap specimens on it, knowing they would die) or using liquid ammonia. For my last aquarium, since ...


8

It is special in a sense that most aquarium setups include a lot of equipment, mainly a filter; the filter facilitates cultivation of nitrifying bacteria that are responsible for neutralization of harmful waste products - ammonia and nitrite. Without a filter, they would quickly build up to toxic levels and kill all animal life in the aquarium. These ...


8

Fish swimming with their mouth constantly glued to water surface is a sign that they are gasping for breath. However, the reason for them being short for breath usually isn't the low oxygen concentration in the water itself, but toxic effect of water pollutants: ammonia (NH3), which burns fish's gills and disables them from extracting oxygen from the water; ...


7

You can buy a dissolved oxygen meter, but they'll generally start in the US$200 to US$400 range, and a suitable one I believe runs closer to US$500-600. Not exactly an everyday piece of equipment for a measurement you're going to take once. There are cheaper test kits designed for other applications, but those will only get you in the approximate ball park, ...


7

Water changes are almost what they sound like, you're changing the water in the tank. But, with very few exceptions, you never want to change more than 50% of the water in the tank. Water changes that replace a substantial percentage of tank's volume can cause the fish stress, and should really only be done in emergencies. Even if there is a problem with the ...


7

You should not. How could you be so sure that the fish died a natural death? I mean, if it was due to some disease then it could be spread if other fishes eat the dead body. And if it's due to some natural death it will still be a risk of water pollution through the dead body degradation process. It can make water toxic, so why take that risk with your ...


7

Firstly, I'll go for my old refrain "consistency is key". It's better to have consistent water parameters than changing them continually to 'chase the perfect conditions'. Firstly, your nitrite should be 0 if your tank is correctly cycled. Secondly, you haven't got a reading for ammonia there (which is one of the problems with the test strips). Ammonia, as ...


6

Back when we had an aquarium we just took it slow. First you fill the aquarium with sand, rocks and all other non-living decorative stuff. It is advised to wash and clean the sand before putting it in the aquarium. This reduces dust and possible contaminants that might have aggregated in the packaging process. After some hours up to a few days, after the ...


6

If I were to make a safe guess, it would be the tank cycle is not completed yet. If it is a matured tank, then something must have been disturbed which triggered the tank cycle to reset. If your tap water has high chlorine/chloramines, this could possibly kill the beneficial bacteria colony inside the filter. If you have washed your filter using tap water, ...


6

The appropriate pH level of the water does vary a bit by fish, but too acidic can definitely kill them. Any change in pH levels that you want to introduce should be done gradually to avoid a shock to the fish, but some ways to go about this include: Partial water changes, about 25% on a frequent basis. You don't have to change out the water completely, but ...


6

The pH should not change more than 0,2 during 24 hours. If it is more, it can stress your fish. The goal is to have a neutral pH of 7,0 for most fish, but this is very dependent on the type of fish you have. Some need alkaline water, other acidic water (so just about now is a good time to read about your fish and their needs). The main reason for large ...


5

I think either one could work for you without harming the fish. You could use bottled water and treat it like tap water. Since that's basically all it is. The only problem I'd see, is if the company puts in certain minerals to enhance the taste. They could mess with the chemistry of your tank, though probably not noticeably. On the other hand, distilled ...


5

I highly doubt that water change would stress her that much. However here is what you do. Prepare gigantic batch of good water, get two tubes and another empty bucket. And then use dripping method. Let water drip into the tank from the good batch of water, and out of the tank into empty bucket. This will ensure that water is changed at an extremely slow pace....


5

Soda water uses carbonic acid to produce CO2 so in theory it should work, but it is not that easy: carbonic acid is as the name says an acid, and any type of acid will lower the water's pH too fast for the fish and to some degree too fast for the plants to adapt to the changed pH. Carbonic acid dissolves calcium creating calcium carbonate, so if you have ...


5

When fish goes to the surface of the water there is some thing wrong, like the lack of oxygen or the presence of poisonous substances in the water. The water test you are using is not reliable and it does not measure ammonia, so it is better to use a liquid type of test kit. The API Quick Start is a bacteria mix and is used when one cycles the tank, a little ...


5

It sounds as though you already have a good knowledge of how water chemistry works. In basic terms, KH (carbonate hardness) affects how much the pH can change within the water. The presence of the carbonic acid in the water stops the pH from fluctuating wildly when it is influenced by CO2 or by other pH influencers. You'll probably be familiar with the ...


5

Firstly, thank you for reading about the nitrogen cycle before getting fish! That's a +1 straight away. Biofilter is a bit of a funny term, really, because all filters technically become biofilters as long as they have media that would allow beneficial bacteria to grow on it. A lot of your beneficial bacteria will also live in your substrate, if you have any,...


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