17

Your goldfish has ammonia poisoning. First aid for this is to change 50% of the water at once. You need to change 20% of the water on day 2 and day 3, and from day 4 you need to change 10% water daily. Test the water for ammonia every day until the level is safe. Do not feed your fish until the ammonia level is safe, and after the ammonia level is safe ...


16

Ich Ichthyophthirius multifiliis (Source) Ich is an tiny ectoparasite that can harm fish if they succumb to it. If not cared for properly, it can kill fish. It's important to note that Ich is always present, and there is nothing you can do to get rid of it. Fish are naturally immune to Ich, and only succumb to it when their immune systems or protective ...


15

Dude, don't try to treat that cat yourself, no matter what the advice you get on here. Get it to a vet as soon as you can, or find someone else who can. It looks pretty bad (a lot worse than "encrusted dirt and dust"). I realize you are trying to help the poor guy - and I applaud you for that - but please be careful to be sure you are doing more good than ...


13

As a cancer patient, your risk may be higher than another person's due to the possibility of being immunocompromised. I would consult with your doctor to get a better assessment as to the risk. Immunocompromised people can own pets safely, but they must take much more precaution, and therefore such a person might not consider pet ownership to be worth the ...


13

You need to be present in the room if your child is to pet the cat. Young babies have little control of their body, so he might scare your cat. This might lead to the cat clawing or biting your child, so you need to stay close to him. It is best to keep the cat away from your child when you are not present in the room and to keep the cat out of your child's ...


12

You should take your new pet to your vet for a healthy pet check up, regardless of where you got it. Many shelters (all that I work with) will have vet checked your pet as part of the intake and maintenance of the animal as part of their program. All the shelters in my area have vets on staff as full time positions, in my opinion shelter pets are more ...


12

It's not easy to give one definitive answer - it's never really absolutely and completely safe, even healthy adults could get infected by pathogens transmitted from the cat. On the other hand - we humans, as species, don't derive our evolutionary success from obsessive avoidance of pathogens. Also, a baby could potentially get infected in a wide variety of ...


11

Whiskas generally contains the same ingredients (sourced from the same locations) as many other commercially available cat foods. This fact was made very clear during the 2007 Melamine Pet Food Recall as pet owners feeding nearly every brand scrambled to find something safe to feed their pets as we learned that "two Chinese nationals and the businesses ...


11

Canine Corner: Can Dogs Get Infected by the Ebola Virus? This link, I think, provides the best answer with scientific evidence and provided myself with the answer I was looking for. Unfortunately, we have more to worry about now since Ebola is actually in the US. Here is a piece of the article that directly answers that question by Dr. Coren: "...


11

From what I hear, it's typical for a cat with kidney disease to have their health go critical very suddenly, and when that happens, then it is definitely time. With a human, you could put them on dialysis, or give them a kidney transplant, but these are not available for cats, nor do I think they would be very good treatment options for them if we could do ...


10

No you don't need a species specific meter; you can use a human meter for this purpose, but regular engagement with a vet, and having a discussion with a vet on this, is very important. In any event, I got curious about your question and so did a little research on feline diabetes. This led me to a nicely written article from the Veterinary school at ...


10

Still hard to tell from the pictures and I wouldn't be able to just diagnose in any event (I'm not a vet), but it does look a bit like encrusted dirt and dust (I don't think that's what it is, just looks like it) from the photo. However, there are a few things I think you should do: Give the kitten access to water, a shallow bowl would be ideal. Go out and ...


9

Prescription kidney diets are beneficial for cats with chronic kidney disease (CKD) for many reasons, but the primary reasons: protein restricted (cats with CKD struggle to filter the protein out of the blood) low phosphorus (hyperphosphatemia, or high blood phosphorus levels is damaging to the kidneys) high potassium (cats with CKD commonly develop ...


8

This behavior is called "mowing" informally, but any type of hair loss is referred to as "alopecia". It can be caused by Parasites (fleas, mites, ringworm) Allergies (food, seasonal, environmental) Dry Skin (nutrition deficiency or environmental) Pain Psychological (boredom, anxiety) (Source: WebMD) It's likely (based on what I've read and my personal ...


8

They need to see a vet, chances are it's feline rhinotracheitis which can cause some issues with eyes (we see this a lot in our cats from the SPCA), it could also be an eye infection which would require antibiotic eye drops. Only way to know and treat is by taking them to a vet.


7

It sounds like your rabbits are infected with Encephalitozoon cuniculi or Baylisascaris procyonis. Generally, once a rabbit shows signs, it's too late to save them from it, though I am not saying you should not try. Anecdotally from talking with other breeders, the most common culprit seems to be hay that has either been rained on or been exposed to other ...


7

Swim bladder disease, or disorder, isn't necessarily any one thing, it's basically the result of some other condition adversely affecting the swimbladder of the fish. The swimbladder is an internal organ in fish which is used to increase or decrease buoyancy of the fish enabling it to maintain itself at a depth in the water without specific effort. Failure ...


7

According to researchers, dogs, pigs, many other mammals, and birds are susceptible to ebola. The current epidemic is believed to have originated in bats and jumped to people hunting bats for food. In dogs, the virus is often asymptomatic; Meaning they won't show symptoms of the virus. source: Weingartl HM, Nfon C, Kobinger G (2013). "Review of Ebola ...


7

The answer to this is yes this do happen but sex is only one way cats can get infected other types of close contact can spread diseases too. Feline herpes can be transmitted by body fluids. FIV cat aids can be transmitted by body fluids. Feline chlamydia can be transmitted by body fluids, Panelukopenia virus can be transmitted by body fluids. Calcivirus can ...


7

Can(I just need a moderate possibility of 3% or so, so as to brand them dirty) a human not allergic to them get moderately sick because of contact with their dirt, mud, dust, hair, saliva, tears, sweat, bacteria, archaea, microzoa, parasites, fungi, feces, urine , sebum, mucus? Yes. According to this article "approximately 4 million pet-derived infections ...


7

In my (admittedly limited) experience with tumors, there's not much you can do against the odor. First you need to understand the state your dog is in. Tumors are bundles of cells that are physically and functionally changed (the medical term is "neoplastic cells" or "neoplasia"). A tumor "rupturing" doesn't mean it's going to ...


6

The current veterinary recommendations are to reduce phosphorus in cats with kidney disease. Foods high in protein tend to also be high in phosphorus, so that's why foods developed for cats with kidney disease also have lower protein levels. That said, cats with kidney disease also tend to have nausea/upset stomach that makes eating difficult, and low ...


6

Inflammatory Bowel Disease, the animal variant of Crohn's disease, is diet managed for much of the management of it and you may need to try several different food options before you latch on to one that really helps keep it controlled. In particular, what you want to look at is: High protein/meat content in the food as many foods for cats have fillers and ...


6

Transmission of the Virus From the (US) Center for Disease Control information page on rabies: People usually get rabies from the bite of a rabid animal. It is also possible, but quite rare, that people may get rabies if infectious material from a rabid animal, such as saliva, gets directly into their eyes, nose, mouth, or a wound. Scratches, ...


6

I concur with all the answers that say "take this cat to the vet, do not try to treat this on your own". The pictures are poor quality -but- to me it looks like some kind of infection. I would also say: quarantine this cat, do not let it near other cats until this medical problem is taken care of, and have a vet give it a general exam (in addition to ...


6

Honestly, I wouldn't do it. First of all, I don't think that baby wipes contain a disinfectant. Yes, they'll clean the baby, but that's not the same as disinfecting. Then: Babies don't usually lick themselves and I can't imagine that it would be healthy to consume large quantities of the residue of baby wipes, including the oil that most wipes include to re-...


6

I would show those videos to a vet; they may be able figure out what it is once they see it, or at least tell you if she is in pain. The fact that she doesn't avoid the triggers and is relaxed afterward suggests to me that the seizure itself is not painful, although the resulting injuries might be. Triggers: When she wakes up, when she gets up to fast, ...


6

Veterinary services are never free. Someone always pays, whether that be a charitable institution, or the veterinarian themselves. Nowhere will offer you veterinary treatment for free, but there may be low cost clinics in your area. There are many options for possible financial assistance; a list of options appears on the website of Cascades Humane Society ...


6

You need to ask your vet about the treatment of this. Most of us here are common pet owners, so all I can do is give you some advice. Antibiotics are only an option if your cat has a bacterial infection. And as far as I can see, this might not be the case in your cat. Vets do often give steroids to treat pancreatitis in cats. Ask your vet about this to find ...


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