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14

The first thing you want to do to battle algae is to remove excessive light. The worst is when sunlight reaches the tank. Algae can grow in very little light, so given sunlight (or even a tank light that's on for more than 12 hours), algae will be able to grow even faster. It's different for each tank, some of mine I can keep lit for almost 12 hours, others ...


13

Don't panic, it's probably okay! The key thing here is that you caught the error and asked the question. I'll cover both bases here and try and explain a few things (forgive me if you already know them). Firstly, this is a good sized tank, so if you've only added a small amount of water, it probably won't make much difference. The dilution of the bottled ...


12

If the algae is brown in color (diatom), has already settled and is hard; magnetic cleaners or algae-eating species wont be of much help. You can wrap a small piece of cloth around your hand and simply rub it off. You can also use an old toothbrush. Once the algae is off the glass, you can then use a magnetic cleaner or introduce algae-eating species as a ...


9

There are a few types of fish that feed on algae, and some are pretty cool looking. I've found this list of algae-eaters, which is a great list because it lets you know whether your existing fish will find them tasty. Some examples: Otocinclus sp. American flagfish Neritina sp. zebra snail Whiptail catfish.


6

If you currently have an algae problem, the main thing to do is identify the cause of the algae. Usually the cause is an imbalance in the tank, usually it's due to excess light or excess nutrients. This is something you'll need to balance so that you stop battling the algae. However, as this question is "how do I get rid of algae," I'll outline the steps - ...


6

Your Echinodorus tenellus should grow pretty fast if they have enough light and a good substrate. So, probably, your fish won't be able to destroy it. And I would go with some Otocinclus. Although they are somehow sensitive, they do good in planted aquariums, specially if it has enough algae, that seems to be your case.


6

You can use a magnetic fish tank cleaner (one example). It consists of two pieces that use magnets to attach through the glass. One piece is often shaped like a grip, the other piece has a surface used to clean off the algae. You have to be careful the cleaning surface is free of sand or other dirt, otherwise you might scratch the glass. There are ...


5

As a general diagnosis of the situation, it sounds like what you have is an algae bloom. Algae grows when there is sufficient nutrients and light in the tank which is not being used by anything else. UV Steriliser You've already got a UV steriliser which can help to combat the problem but is not the only way. The key to a UV steriliser is the amount of time ...


4

It's cyanobacteria. It comes in a multitude of colors, purple'ish and dark green are the most common, but can be any range from tan to almost completely black. If this is a new tank, it's not uncommon to go through a number of algae and bacteria stages over the first year or so. In this case it will likely pass if you keep up good maintenance. You can blast ...


4

Here's an update on my research and how it went in my tank. I searched many sources for the cause of those algae and how to kill them. It was suggested to me that red algae appear in high pH water, which wasn't my case (around 7). I haven't found a cause for them to appear. Here's what I did to remove them: I had quite a bit of brown/green algae on the ...


4

I use Seachem Flourish Excel at 1.5X for a week and then at the recommended strength until it's gone. All up, about 2 weeks. I have had two outcomes from this method. 1. The algae disappears or is reduced to pin head sized dots on some of the plants. 2. The algae goes from black to blonde and then molts. I don't know what factors have influenced these quite ...


4

If I've done my math right, those pots will probably hold a bit under 40 gallons of water (depending on the exact shape of the pot, depth of the substrate, etc.). That should be sufficient for two or three adult goldfish assuming adequate filtration. I would have concerns about temperature fluctuations given the black paint job in the sun though. As far as ...


4

First, as Henders says, this is almost certainly not an issue at all. But I would continue to use tank water to thaw the krill from here on out. In fact, I'd go a step further: you can put the tank water and krill in a small tupperware container and float that in the tank for several minutes. This not only thaws the krill, but gets it to the same ...


4

Your tank is not properly cycled yet. Take this a bit slower, do not add any animals to your tank until it is properly cycled. The gray you can see in your tank is bacteria starting to grow. It is normal to have this in the beginning before the tank is in biological balance. The gray stuff will go away after a few days and it is not only bacteria, but ...


3

You did too many things in too little time. Maybe you want to take a step back and do things gradually. In that way, you will be able to better understand the source of your problems. Move everything is a different vessel(s) (can even be larger glass jars). Properly clean and disinfect the aquarium (gravel, filter, other accessories also); be sure to remove ...


3

Underwater plants in the Elodea genus do grow fast and absorb lots of nutrients. They are good oxgenating plants that absorb CO2 and this is positive for your fish. Goldfish will probably eat some of this plant, so you will have the added bonus of free food for your fish. An other plant you might try is watercress. The stems of this plant are air filled so ...


3

Rather than using algaecide potentially causing harm to plants, animals, producing workers and the rest of the world Lower PO43- value to the minimum by adding pug to the filter. Usually takes effect (with 1 mg/l) after 48 hours. It's the initial nutrition for the algae. Provide less food which increases the PO43- value (frozen food and others). Turn on an ...


3

Get snails. They are much more effective than fish in cleaning algae. I have three large mystery snails, two zebra snails, and a bunch of Malaysian trumpet snails and ramshorn snails. My glass and, most important, my plants are spotless clean.


2

I dosed my tank with "flourish" at 3X rated dosage 20 hours ago in an attempt to knock the black algae back on my amazon swords (This method has worked in the past at 2X normal dosage so I thought I would up the ante a little). For some reason my mollies and muppies (deliberate x breeds) are now all over the black algae and vigorously eating it. This has ...


2

That's not algae, those are diatoms. That is part of the natural cycling process and are usually an indicator of high bacteria if you are dosing carbon (it's feeding on the excess bacteria) or disoolved solids (TDS) in your water. If you are dosing carbon, cut it back slowly (or if using bio-pellets, you might be using too much). For a tank that's not ...


2

It's not impossible nor even slightly hard to remove black algae. I've had it in all of my tanks mainly because of scheduling. I leave my aquariums running 24-7. I've even bought used tanks with that are covered in it. I fill the tank, let it cycle and drop in some of my snails. I'm aware most people hate snails, but they're actually a really great cleaning ...


2

I have experienced this one before around 3 years ago, I have a 20-gallon planted tank at my desk near the window and was not directly exposed to the sunlight. Days passed by, it produces algae but the colour is green and not brown but I know it is algae because the plants I added in my tank is just Java ferns, Anubias and I forgot the other names of the ...


2

I agree with Kevin, these "algae" are most likely just trails left by the snails. If they're still getting used to the water or they think there's something not perfectly fine, they'll use more slime to cover themselves. That Nitrate level is perfectly fine, Nitrite should in theory be a perfect 0, but that might be your test. Only problem with your water ...


2

I think you're looking at waste from the snails here. Also, water changes should be done on a weekly basis, probably around 25-30%. Certainly not daily. Edit: White hair algea looks like this: http://www.plantedtank.net/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=13590&stc=1&d=1242787789 I don't think this is what's going on in your tank. Snails like that ...


2

Try an UV sterilizer. This will kill the algae in the water. You will still have to do water changes to get rid of the dead algae, but over the space of a week with a few water changes you should have crystal clear water. What won't work: Reducing light: Algae need light to grow, so reducing the light would seem like a good idea. The problem is that your ...


2

Regarding the PO43-, it's not a high PO43- that could cause algae. It's more the ratio between NO3- and PO43- that could cause it (it's called the Redfield Ratio). More information about it can be found here: https://buddendo.home.xs4all.nl/aquarium/redfield_eng.htm And most often the cause of algae is a lack of nutrients for your plants in combination with ...


2

First of all you will have to be sure you have good filtration, your pump and filter needs to filter all the water at least once every hour. The UV bulb needs to be changed every 6 months of use as the UV light output will degrade over time. The glass of your UV lamp needs to be cleaned when you can see it is dirty; you can use vinegar if there is limescale ...


2

I've successfully gotten rid of the algae by taking all my plants out and placing them into a quarantine tank, then dosing the tank with hydrogen peroxide for 3 days. I'm not too sure on the specifics about how it works, but I found the solution suggested on some forums. A solution of 1 milliliter of hydrogen peroxide per 30 liters of water is supposed to ...


2

I would just pull it out. My plan, which partly works, is to have enough regular plants to out-compete the hair algae for nutrients. But, occasionally, I pull a gob of hair algae out of a small pond, all tangled with hornwort and duckweed.


2

Maybe a few herbivore snails? I used to own some and they were pretty good, but they reproduce fast so you might have to take out a few every month, but they scrub away thing rather quickly leaving a clean trail, Cory catfish can do a good job too. If it’s a big problem, you could shorten the duty cycle of light so that the algae don’t grow as rapidly, I ...


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