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22

Yes, there is something inherently repulsive in snails: their slime, which is sticky and sometimes stinks or tastes bad. Snails not only produce it to slither over surfaces, when they are attacked or injured, they produce lots of it as a defensive mechanism, relying on the attacker being grossed out by the sticky slime in their mouth. Most animals find it ...


7

There are... The ramshorn snail is an algae eater that will tend to stick to algae unless they become starved. As wiki notes, though, they can end up being a pest in the tank rather than an aid to it if you have more than one. The nerite snails are also algae eaters, but with the added bonus that they won't breed in fresh water. The trapdoor snails are ...


6

You'll always want to add fish into a tank slowly. When you add fish in, there's going to be a bit of an ammonia spike as the bacteria in the tank processes the chemical imbalance. The trick is balancing out how many fish you can add that won't cause too much of a chemical imbalance that they'll be harmed by it. That's why I usually suggest adding the ...


6

This article has several good suggestions for potential betta tankmates. It also mentions: Please remember that the ideas below are suggestions. Your betta may get along just fine with all of these new tankmates, or he might kill and eat them. Every betta is different, and these are just general guidelines. It sounds like your betta is potentially ...


5

I've gone through two snails with my betta over the last few years. I've never seen the betta care about the snail's presence. I would think the snail probably died of natural causes. I don't think snails are as robust as bettas!


5

In my experience kuhli loach is not effective in any way at removing snails from a fish tank, no matter the number of loaches you have they will not remove the snails (even if you stop feeding the kuhli loaches in your tank, they will not eat the snails; please believe me on this, I have tried this by accident). The solution you want for removing snails from ...


4

The best way I find to pick up my snail is by wetting a popsicle stick and putting it underneath his head. You can be somewhat forceful with it. You can wiggle it underneath their bodies and they will slowly crawl up onto it and it allows you to move them around. I also use his cuttlebone. It works great. I use my fingers and let them crawl onto it as long ...


4

Stocking is very subjective to the specific inhabitants as well as the setup and your aquarium experience. There's a general 1" of fish per gallon guideline for FW tanks, but that's also subjective and most experienced aquarists disagree with it. For your size fish it should be mostly appropriate. Since you're just starting out with it, I would get the tank ...


4

The stocking rule is very often subjective to other factors beyond just the size and quantity of the fish in the tank. Water changes, type of fish, tank mates, keeper experience, potential adult size are just some of the factors that should be used in determining reasonable stocking. I've been keeping fish for about 25 years now, and I consider a tank ...


4

The shell of snails do infact grow along with the snail. The link below might help answer this question in more detail. http://mentalfloss.com/article/48796/are-snails-born-shells


4

This answer is part of Pet's Spring Cleaning Campaign. This question is old, but this answer will still help people with the same problem. The short answer is that yes, the snails probably are suffering, but we don't know if this tank is their usual enclosure or just their temporary home for a week. The size of the enclosure is not even enough to house 2 ...


4

Feeding your fish once a day is good advice, but the result is this: you feed the fish (and the snails) less and so they will just reproduce slower. You could even stop feeding the fish for a week or a month and it would have no effect, except that your snails multiply slower and your fish will be starving (this is purely for an example and I would not ...


4

What I've gathered through analysing the comments is that bladder snails (identified as the species in question), along with other species, may go above the waterline but will usually return back into the water on their own accord. From what I've found elsewhere on the web, they do this to feed or lay eggs, or even just to get out of the water if the ...


4

If you'd just like the final numbers and are less concerned about the reasoning behind them, answer is as follows: EITHER get 2 African clawed frogs OR 6 neon tetras, 6 cherry barbs, 6 gold barbs, 3 guppies, and 0-1 snails. Detailed answer below: African clawed frogs are generally recommended to be kept in a species-only tank. (As in no fish, just frogs.) ...


4

No. Go lookup the life-cycle of the rat lungworm. It and most other parasitic organisms have very specific stages and vectors for being transmitted, in this case the rat lungworm is specifically carried through a land based snail and slug lifecycle, using rats as a carrier for one of those stages. With that being said, I still wouldn't eat snails or ...


4

Since the medicated water and the neighbor's water both might bring undesirable consequences, and we don't have another trusted aquarium to provide water, I will suggest that you can mitigate the effects of the new cycle by changing water very regularly, for example 50% every single day. (with dechlorinator) This way any explosion of ammonia will be managed ...


4

I agree with Manuki and I'd also add a few other things: The amount of ammonia in the water will depend on how much the inhabitants are producing. If you're feeding very sparsely, they'll produce less ammonia. A snail and some smallish frogs should be relatively low impact. The more water you can put them in the better (for stability and for soiling). Make ...


4

I have kept aquarium snails of different kinds but never encountered such an issue. I will still try to tell you as much as possible, in case anything can help. Possible causes: Water quality. This is the most easy answer. An excess of pollution could be burning up these sensitive parts. No matter what the issue is, keeping your water extra clean is your ...


3

The simplest and easiest way to repair the shell is to make sure your water contains calcium in the right amount. Most snails living in water need hard water (water containing dissolved minerals and calcium salts); one way to do this is to add GH salt, another is to add crushed sea shells. If the mineral content of your water is good the snails will repair ...


3

Ideally your snail-neglecting roommate would have gotten a low wattage heating mat (similar to this one) for their tank. You may or may not be up for spending ~$15 on one. If you do get a heating mat you'll want to stick it to the side of the tank, and not put it underneath as snails burrow in response to overheating. You'll also need a way to monitor the ...


3

These snails are able to reproduce on their own so there's a few options to get rid of them. Setting up snail traps and removing them yourself, as you see them scoop them out. I.e placing a small dish at bottom of tank with lettuce overnight, they will go to it and you can easily remove them. Purchasing an assassin snail, they don't reproduce like crazy, ...


3

Growth rate and how large they get depends on they environment and the genus. Many can grow to about 1" in six months or so, then continue growing from there. It is common for a lot of the baby snails to not last the long.


3

I know the question is old and the OP have probably resolved his issue. There are already several good answer here but I would like add one more. I was searching a solution for my community tank to get rid of snail or at least limit their population. I have shrimps in there so most chemicals were out of question. Second there was the assassin snail ...


3

Those are snail eggs. I had a snail lay eggs at the top of my tank once too. If you leave them alone they will eventually hatch into dozens of tiny snails.


3

I can't tell from the picture, but if you have live plants in the tank, snails will often be attached. For future reference, when you buy live plants at a shop, rinse and run your hand across the leaves to detach any snails and eggs back into the plant tank. Snails multiply easily and quickly, so I would remove them now if you don't want lots of snails. ...


3

Two possible things I can think of judging by the pic: Just grabbing some air. Apple snails have a kind of snorkel they use to breath air from the surface. You can see it in the right of your picture. Trying to eat stuff from the water surface. If you look at the water surface from an angle, you might see a thin, somewhat smeary, almost oil-like looking ...


3

Manuki and Henders have both provided great advice. I was concerned I needed to act fast, so I made an executive decision before they had responded. However, I think the decision I made is reflected in their advice. I have a bottle of the Top Fin Bacteria Supplement. I put that in the vase to help break down the ammonia that was building up in their vase. ...


3

So you say you've got Snail problems? Snails can be a big issue, especially in planted tanks where they can cause issues I'll explain later on. Snail population blooms are a common occurrence in freshwater aquariums. It is important to know the source of the problem even after you've dealt with the immediate effects. What are the downsides of having a snail ...


3

Snails need substrate to be "happy" Based on my experience. I's not strictly essential for their survival but snail will bury if they need to lay eggs and if the environment they are in is not ideal (too low moisture, too cold/hot, not enough food). I use store bought coconut fiber as a substrate, it doesn't smell and it retains moisture much ...


2

Don't pick up a snail by their shell, as I have done with one and she came out way too far and she died so either slide food under them / wait for them to crawl onto it or touch their face and slide them off


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