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Diet: Make sure your crabs are getting a good diet pre-molt. A varied diet including lots of high-energy and high-calcium foods. Natural peanut butter, honey, cuttlefish bone, and sesame seeds are all good choices. Fresh or dried fruit and vegetables or even unseasoned meat trimmings can be added to this to help round things out. Humidity: 80% RH is ...


5

I found it is the German "Kleiner Schneckenegel" (Alboglossiphonia heteroclita, synonym: Glossiphonia heteroclita) which is a kind of leech. They eat snails and other related kind of animals. I found the German Wikipedia page but it seems there is no English source for this on Wikipedia. If someone knows a source, I would be happy to add it. The ...


4

If you are doing aquaponics and you have to clean your tank, you are not doing it right. You should have an ammonia and nitrogen cycle going. I have two ponds, one on the top of my hillside and one on the bottom. I've had a permaculture food forest going for about 7 years now. I have a couple different species of fish in the top larger pond. That pond ...


4

Speaking towards the tilapia, there species is chyclids. These fish generally have a strong pecking order, and any fish in with them that is not used to a pecking order tends to get pecked, a lot! I had some tilapia in my aquaponics system and as they grew they even pecked and ate each other. I cannot talk towards clams or oysters, and I thought lobsters ...


4

It seems to be the case that certain types of clam reduce nitrates though there does not appear to be much information on this. Forum discussions from hobbyists suggest that there are people using clams for this reason in aquariums but most seem to be of the opinion it does not make a massive difference. If you are interested in trying you could acquire a ...


4

There are many different types of aquarium crayfish, that have different levels of activity, aggression, size, and feeding habits, as well as different individual personalities, so its hard to say exactly if this would be ok or not. As a general answer, I think you are correct in thinking they would be dangerous for your fish. Guppies are not great ...


3

As others have said, crayfish would be an inappropriate fish to keep with your current selection. As an alternative to crayfish you might want to look at giant fan shrimp (Atya gabonensis). They look almost identical except these have fans not claws at the front. They don't grow as big as crayfish and they are not predatory. In fact, they're more likely to ...


3

Yes, you can keep shrimps in your tank, but you will want to keep shrimps away from predatory fish if you want them to reproduce. The first thing to do is to set up your tank and cycle it properly. You can take a look here on how this is done. You need to get an air driven sponge-filter. This is to avoid shrimps or baby shrimps to be pulled into the filter, ...


3

The process might be irrelevant due to the brain size/incapacity to feel pain as pointed out in @MSU_Bulldog's answer. Since precise cutting with a sharp blade into the brain is not an option as it is for fish, there remains the option to introduce brain/nervous system death through cold. That might have led to the idea that just any process of freezing ...


3

I think that freezing the shrimp would be the least painful. Put it in a bag of water, then refrigerate for about an hour, then freeze overnight. And honestly some say that just putting it in a bag and stomping it or hitting it against the wall is a quick and painless way to euthanize the shrimp. I know stomping sounds horrible, but it is quick. Here is ...


2

It went pretty much as I expected it to, I was just afraid to take the leap with that little death trap. He was incredibly easy to catch at night when he was moving about in the open. Exposing them to air briefly is not known to cause an issue (as it does with some echinoderms Moving it to a quarantine tank for just one night would likely add unnecessary ...


2

Producing these for food is not something to "stumble" upon. About the easiest thing on your list is tilapia, and you are probably not aware that all tilapia in the USA and Canada food markets are males - the fry are treated with hormones to achieve this. I would suggest starting with catfish in at least 1000 gallon (around 3800 liters) pond/tank. Look ...


2

You can buy a vermicomposter or build one. The size of the worm bin will depend on what species or how many worms you are culturing. If you will be raising them outside, your climate and temperatures will impact the productivity of your worms. Lumbricus terrestris earthworms require cool temperatures (50-70 °F). European earth worms (Eisenia hortensis) can ...


2

Hermit crabs are known to fight, so this might be a result of it feeling safer now once the other one is gone. Lots of crustaceans have problems living close to each other, and one can see this in crabs-crayfish-lobsters; they will fight and hurt each other. So your hermit crab does probably feel safer now and this is why it is more active now.


2

This is totally normal. It's dried up slime to conserve moisture. The snails will hibernate in this. My snails are hibernating too right now, but I wake them up once a week to feed them. To remove it just use a toothpick; BE REALLY CAREFUL they are often just right under this layer and won't like being poked.


2

Snails are generally much more resistant to water changes than fish (and definitely shrimp). So I would not bother to acclimate them, or definitely not for the same duration as with fish or shrimps. E.g. 15 minutes or so, just to be safe. I bought a few a few of these a while back and just dropped them in my tank. I also transferred them from 1 tank to ...


1

To keep crayfish in your pond you first need to create hiding places; you can use rocks to build these or use plastic tubes. The ones used for plumbing or drainage are good; they need to be 20-30cm long and have a diameter of about 10cm, you can make a cluster of 2-5 tubes and weigh them down to keep them in place. Be sure the materials you use do not leach ...


1

What J.Musser said is a good idea. You don't have to have anything that complicated, but it's a nice design. Basically a vermicomposter is a worm habitat. It just has the side benefit of making really good soil for plants. I really like to grow and I'm just getting into composting and vermicomposting, having always used miracle grow. So the fresh greens ...


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