14

This is a good example of overstocking a fish tank. Don't feel too bad about it, I don't know anyone who didn't overstock their tank the first time. It's just too tempting. Here's the problem though... Fish waste contains ammonia, which is toxic to fish. Which wouldn't be a problem for them in a lake or river, but we keep them in a glass box. Meaning, ...


12

Don't panic, it's probably okay! The key thing here is that you caught the error and asked the question. I'll cover both bases here and try and explain a few things (forgive me if you already know them). Firstly, this is a good sized tank, so if you've only added a small amount of water, it probably won't make much difference. The dilution of the bottled ...


12

John Cavan's advice is good. Some additional advice that I learned the hard way after many years of owning 80 and 300 litre freshwater tanks: If you don't have a working understanding of pH, it is helpful to read up on it. A precise definition of pH is unnecessary; a good way to think of it is that pH measures the amount of free hydrogen atoms in the water. ...


11

First, a little background on the aquarium nitrogen cycle. Fish produce ammonia, which is extremely toxic to the fish. Unlike in a natural body of water, in an aquarium there is nowhere for this toxin to go, so it builds up fast. Luckily, there is bacteria in your tank that converts ammonia into nitrite. However, nitrite is also extremely toxic to fish. ...


8

The easiest way I know is to "transplant" from a good, running aquarium, so that all those desired bacteria will begin to reproduce in your aquarium and make that cycle. In the internet some people also recommend using fish to do this job (so you´d put some cheap specimens on it, knowing they would die) or using liquid ammonia. For my last aquarium, since ...


8

The first, and possibly most important, thing to look at is your tank size. In my opinion, .5 gallons is way too small of a living space for 4 fish. If you have room for a larger tank, I recommend it. A bigger tank means more surface area, which means more contact with the air. The most basic way to introduce oxygen to a still body of water (such as your ...


6

Back when we had an aquarium we just took it slow. First you fill the aquarium with sand, rocks and all other non-living decorative stuff. It is advised to wash and clean the sand before putting it in the aquarium. This reduces dust and possible contaminants that might have aggregated in the packaging process. After some hours up to a few days, after the ...


6

The appropriate pH level of the water does vary a bit by fish, but too acidic can definitely kill them. Any change in pH levels that you want to introduce should be done gradually to avoid a shock to the fish, but some ways to go about this include: Partial water changes, about 25% on a frequent basis. You don't have to change out the water completely, but ...


5

One way to do this is to get an extra aquarium heater and a large container. Set the heater to the same temperature as your tank and let the water slowly heat up overnight. By doing it this way, you remove some of the chlorine in your water and the amount of other dissolved gases in the water will be reduced too if they are present. You will need to mix ...


4

First, as Henders says, this is almost certainly not an issue at all. But I would continue to use tank water to thaw the krill from here on out. In fact, I'd go a step further: you can put the tank water and krill in a small tupperware container and float that in the tank for several minutes. This not only thaws the krill, but gets it to the same ...


4

The info you've been given in the previous answers is good. Water that has a decent buffering capacity (generally lots of carbonates) will be more resistant to pH fluctuations than water that does not. (If your water is pH 7 straight out of the tap then it likely has little to no buffering capacity which could definitely account for your dramatic pH swings.)...


4

I think either one could work for you without harming the fish. You could use bottled water and treat it like tap water. Since that's basically all it is. The only problem I'd see, is if the company puts in certain minerals to enhance the taste. They could mess with the chemistry of your tank, though probably not noticeably. On the other hand, distilled ...


4

I've found that with a properly set up terrarium, the substrate shouldn't come into contact with the water, so the only decomposing matter in the water should be the crab's molted shells. Since my terrarium is 30 gallons, and it's only used for molting, I've elected to change the water about once a month. I also put a pinch of aquarium salt into the water ...


4

To answer the question, "Can I?" the answer is probably, "Yes." It would physically work to remove water and automatically replace it. But, there is another question hidden here, "Should I?" And the answer to that is most definitely, "No." Here's why: Flush valves are designed to empty the cistern completely. You would need a way to make sure that you don'...


4

Water changes will indeed reduce nitrate levels within your tank and with 80ppm you'll definitely want to reduce that as soon as you can. You could increase the percentage of your water changes, but one thing that I've found has helped a lot is growing a plant such as pothos (formally referred to as Pothos aureus, also commonly known as devil's ivy) in the ...


3

What are the differences between the tanks? If the cloudy tank has fake plants in it and the others have real plants. You add a little salt to the real plant tanks. Water softerns in houses for well water use salt to make it less hard. Another idea would be during a water change instead of fresh water add water from one of the tanks that are clear. See if it ...


3

The filter sponge is where the beneficial bacteria live which help to take ammonia, turn it into nitrite and then finally convert it into nitrate. These bacteria can also live in the substrate (gravel, sand, dirt etc). In a well established tank, which is what is sounds like you have, your main concerns will be the nitrates. There's a lot of debate about ...


3

No you do not need to change the filter material. But what you need to do is remove the charcoal and replace it with new filter foam (filter sponge). The charcoal is only needed if you are removing medication from the water. When you can see the water flow from your filter is reduced you need to clean the filter foam, to do this you take some water from ...


3

Theoretically, yes Why theoretically? Well, because it relies on a number of other factors too. For example, you need to make sure that there is no chlorine or chloramine in the water because this will kill the beneficial bacteria that live in your substrate (sand / gravel) and filter. (It might be unlikely that a bore well has chlorine in but it's worth ...


3

It depends. This very much depends on how you do your water changes. For me, I make RO water and store it outside (which means it's cold). Then I add hot tap water and a dechlorinator solution to remove the chlorine / chloramine and any heavy metals from the water. This is probably not the most energy efficient way to do it but it allows me granular ...


3

No, water conditioner will not work in this water. What you need to do is use the cold water. Fill the containers with tap water, add the water conditioner and let it stand overnight so it gets heated up a little. It is important to avoid using water that is too cold when you do the water changes. Fish have no problems with a slight drop in temperature as ...


2

Test your tap water for nitrates to be sure that isn't contributing to your problem. And yes, more frequent water changes can help with keeping nitrate levels down. The addition of ghost shrimp can also help, but they may not last long as axolotls tend to find them very tasty. I have a similar issue in my tank (high nitrates, close to 0 ammonia/nitrites). ...


2

I live in Germany. The water quality is measured here in "Härtegrad". In our village we have 40° in the water from our water pipes. Like this site declares, is this 712 ppm (p-arts p-er m-illion of T-otal D-issolved S-olids -> TDS). We use this water regularly (I assume once per month or more) to change one of three parts of the water in our aquarium (...


2

I manage to keep mine to 1-2 °C temperature change when doing up to 50% water changes. That is, the new water is warmer than the existing, and I add cold until it's at least within 1-2 °C, normally and then siphon it into the tank. I can get it down to 0.5 °C without too much difficulty. I'm unsure why you'd subject a fish to anything more ...


2

In my experience with guppy fry, I didn't have any issues vacuuming around them (in a 20 gal planted tank). I just have a simple siphon vacuum and got it running out of the tank, then "paused it" by plugging the outlet tube with my finger, then positioned it in the tank low to the ground and let it flow again. They fry stayed away from my hand and the tube ...


2

So, I'm going to assume you're curing/cycling the rock in the display tank, correct me if I am wrong here. Assuming so, I would definitely do a water change. And I think your concerns are spot on. As soon as you apply light of any reasonable intensity, you're going to almost immediately get GHA and film algae, typically followed by more nefarious algaes. ...


1

The plants will produce oxygen which normally goes into solution. However, if the water is well oxygenated, not all of the oxygen will be able to go into solution, and gas bubbles will be created. As the dissolved oxygen comes out of solution (e.g. overnight), dissolved oxygen levels will drop, and oxygen produced by the plants will again be able to go into ...


1

If you did buy the gravel/sand where you did buy your tank it is probably safe but if bought it at a garden center or at other sources where decoration sand/gravel is sold there might be problems as they might contain harmful substances(heavy metals or dissolvable toxic chemicals or even unwanted but non toxic minerals like calcium or salts). It is also best ...


1

It looks like you are missing the stand pipe for the drain. A common design out there is the durso standpipe. You can make one yourself from PVC pipe or buy one from their website. There are other designs out there but this one is supposed to be one of the quieter ones(and the one I'm going to try on my new reef tank).


1

Just as I understand you right, you wonder how much water there should be in the left one on the picture? I would say zero water, it depends on how high your pipe is from the sump. You build it like that so there will be enough big hole so you don´t overfill you aquarium. You will pump water up and it needs to have somewere to go else it will go over your ...


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