53

Putting a cat on a leash and walking it around isn't species-appropriate. You can and should do that with a dog, but cats usually hate that. They value their autonomy. The idea "My cat will feel safe when I am around" is wrong. Cats don't think that way. While they are social animals, they aren't herd animals like domesticated wolves dogs or humans who have ...


42

Please consider that the problem might not be the harness itself, but how you act with the harness. Chihuahuas are small dogs and can be slinky when they want to avoid something. If you grab her, lift her up and somehow force her into the harness, that process is very uncomfortable. Even if you don't cause her any pain, it's still uncomfortable from a ...


29

I think it is best to stop the walks; cats have a very good memory, so you will have to change the way she gets her exercise. Since she has a very good memory, she will remember that there are cows on that route and will have a bad association with those walks. If you continues to take the walks you might end up in a bad circle for both you and the cat, ...


27

This article from Princeton University deals with laser pointer use and human effect, and it mentions that use of laser pointers that are higher than 5 mW are dangerous and should not be used, so it seems like the green one might be safe, although they recommend that the lower the output the better, as they will be safer. Like with any laser, avoid pointing ...


19

Pigs and dogs are actually quite comparable - in size, development and intelligence. Therefore I'd like to refer you to this question: How often and long should I walk my puppy? There is a 5 minute rule which is basically 5 minutes walk per day, per month of your puppy’s life, so therefore a 3 month old puppy can be walked for 15 minutes and a 4 month old ...


16

The Harness May Be Uncomfortable I have a Golden Retriever and, like most Goldens, she LOVES going out and about. But she was showing similar signs (not wanting to come over and put the harness on, moving her head to make it harder to do, etc.) as your Chihuahua about 2 weeks after we got her a new harness. Once you got it on her, though, she was her ...


12

I use a leash and harness with my cats to let them outside, but I don't take them for a walk as I would with a dog. It's more letting them explore around the yard as much as they want, but controlling how far they go, and when they come back. They're not interested in walking around the block because they don't really like meeting strangers outside of the ...


12

According to my vet, whom I trust utterly, it's absolutely fine for cats to live inside all the time. First up: make sure you feed them an appropriate amount. Read the packaging, get advice from your vet or vet nurse. There are lots of foods out there and you are probably going to be better off with one designed for indoor and/pr neutered cats(which will be ...


9

As low as you can get away with. The issue isn't so much with the output, as it is with keeping the laser beam away from the cat's eyes and minimizing the damage in the event that you accidentally shine the laser in the cat's eyes. Same reason behind why it's illegal to shine a laser at a passing airplane, it has the possibility of blinding the pilot.


9

In my experience (having owned over a dozen outdoor cats), they tend to learn this skill on their own through trial and error. It helps if they have siblings and/or other cats they can watch and learn from as well. Although I was unable to find any formal documentation or guides on "how to train your cat to climb down", I did find this one which details how ...


9

It would be a good idea to avoid popular dog walking routes and you'll perhaps need to scare off interested males. No need to pick her up when she gets approached, just stepping in between her and the other dog should be enough. Chances are she won't approve of the other dogs and refuse their mounting attempts. If you meet another dogwalker during your walk ...


9

I believe the simplest answer is that (a) dogs are more likely to be actively aggressive toward other pets and livestock, and toward humans, and (b) more people feel threatened by a dog than by a cat, so (c) it's considered more necessary to keep dogs under control and (d) leash laws get written for dogs but not cats. Dogs, being pack animals, also care ...


9

Cats should be indoors only, or supervised outdoors You are right to be concerned about letting your cat outside unsupervised. Keeping your cats indoors protects against MANY problems that can make your cat sick or die! According to the American Humane Society, cats who are either part-time or full-time allowed to roam outdoors alone face the following ...


9

There are lots of things you can do to get a cat to exercise a bit more than it usually does! Here's some suggestions! Catnip or honeysuckle toys: The cat could get hyper from them and will play with them more than normal toys. Make sure you supervise and don't leave the toys out while you're gone. Make sure that you change out the toys frequently as well. ...


8

There's not enough information in your post to provide a valid clinical picture. All of the behaviors you mentioned are natural dog behaviors that can occur in many situations. Context Matters Consider that digging can be self-rewarding play or prey drive, or it may be stress-displacement behavior. "Jumping around" in a bouncy way is generally a play ...


8

There are a lot of factors that affect the answer here, and each will affect an individual cat/human pair in different amounts. Harness Training The first step to being able to exercise your cat outside responsibly is to train him to accept the harness and leash. Often when a cat feels an unfamiliar weight on his back, he will roll over to escape it, and ...


8

We had a Labrador Retriever that would run down and catch a Frisbee all day long. When you threw it, she would run it down, catch it, and bring it back and kept doing it as long as you kept throwing it. Because of this, it became necessary to have to cut her off more than once when she started to show signs of wearing down. It's been a few years since ...


8

Optimally every dog would get a couple of hours of walk time every day. Also optimally there would not be any dogs in the shelter. As long as the yard is large enough for the dog to get up to speed and run in circles it should have the opportunity to get all the exercise it wants. For a dog with a big yard, walks are more about social time than exercise. ...


7

Use the red. All lasers can be dangerous if they hit the eye of a cat or a human, but red lasers are usually much less powerful and still very visible to cats. I'm a little torn on this topic because I've used red lasers as a cat toy lots of times, but it really isn't intended as a cat toy and it's worth remembering that their eyes are far more sensitive ...


7

Cat on cat play cannot be forced. Some cats live together their entire lives but never play with each other. That your cats do play together is great! One way to encourage their relationship is to play with them together. String toys on a stick, like the Bird or similar toys are easy to use with one or more cats and lets you direct the toy very precisely so ...


7

I can't provide any insight beyond personal experience, but I have a small dog that goes absolutely nuts when he sees the leash come out from its hiding place. The simple answer is the dog really, really, really wants to go on a walk with you. Dogs are social animals, but they are also outdoor animals. They like to be with their family but at the same ...


7

In addition to Rebecca RVT's excellent suggestions, I would recommend almost any container or packing materials.Cats are notorious for their love of boxes!I can say without hesitation, my many cats over the years have virtually always chosen "free" cat toys like boxes or any kind of ball-of-something; paper, foil, string and anything they can bat around over ...


7

This is quite a common issue that tends to happen with dogs, especially as they reach the one year old mark. Huskies in particular tend to pull, that's why they make great sled dogs! I would start by ensuring you are using adequate equipment. I recommend a regular flat collar (I like leather ones, they aren't as likely to break, something like this) and a ...


6

You're right to be cautious. Run over, run away, injured, made sick... are all likely outcomes. Good luck finding a safe place to take your cat out to. I have seen people take their cats out, a closed garden area sounds like a good option if you can find one... again that doesn't rule out something bad happening involving another dog, cat, or other animal ...


6

I don't think your dog destroying his toys means that he doesn't get enough exercise. I think it's just something he enjoys doing that helps satisfy his need for mental stimulation. My dog is also super high energy and even when I tire her out mentally and physically (11 mile hike after 3 days in a row of multi-hour dog park visits, having to get her dinner ...


6

There's a significant difference between the dog being fatigued and what's healthy for it. Huskies may get problems with their hips, so you don't want to overexercise while still growing up. :) From my own experience (got a husky puppy pretty much about one year ago): Huskies can (and will) run long distances if you allow them to, but it's a general ...


6

Cats stretch, scratch, run and climb and jump for normal exercise. Some cats can be taught to enjoy going outside on a lead, but this isn't really for exercise as the cat will be stopping every few feet to sniff at things.


6

To exercise cats, play with them. Give them something to pounce and chase like a laser-pointer dot or a string or a light ball or a feather wand. Give them climbing/jumping opportunities -- all the better if the jump is a bit challenging but is rewarded with a good resting/watching spot or a view out a window. My two, siblings, sometimes like to wrestle or ...


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