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43

Although PETA seems to say that it's perfectly healthy, cats are not vegetarian and thousands of years of evolution has made them into carnivores. They have a specific requirements for nutrients that vegetarian diets just cannot provide. With the exception of special situations where the cat requires a modified diet, vegetarian diets should be avoided. As ...


39

It is absolutely not advised to feed cats home cooked food because there's a very high risk of malnutrition. Cats evolved to eat 8 - 12 small animals like birds, mice, rats, hamsters and other rodents, maybe the occasional lizard and sometimes even bigger animals like rabbits or chickens daily. They eat the entire prey raw, including skin, claws or talons, ...


38

At this young age the kittens still require milk, you can probably get some kitten milk from a vet store, a quality pet store with a knowledgeable staff, or make your own (only if not available elsewhere, as it is extremely hard to get the nutrition correct, but should be safe for a few days until you find a commercially available one). They will have to be ...


31

In short, iceberg lettuce is mostly water with little to no nutrient value. A rabbit can fill up on it (because of the bulk), but still need food because they didn't get enough calories, vitamins, minerals, etc. If you look at the USDA's webpage on iceberg lettuce. You'll notice that water makes up just about 95% of the nutrients, leaving 5% to be divided up ...


31

I would not give your cat as much as she wants, obesity is a problem in our pets because they eat too much and don't exercise enough. There are guidelines on the bags of food that tells you how much your pet should be eating of that specific food. Sometimes these guidelines are generous so weigh your kitty every 2 weeks to minimum once a month. From ...


30

Probably one of the worst things tuna has, is the high levels of mercury. Even in humans, high levels of mercury acts as a neurotoxin, damaging the brain and nervous system. Since cats have a much smaller body mass than humans, their tolerance for mercury is going to be lower as well. For that reason, it's important to limit how much tuna you feed your cats. ...


30

Coconut oil is safe for cats, if given in moderation. Potential side effects include: Upset stomach Diarrhoea Pancreatitis Weight gain Allergic reaction to coconut oil Since you've been letting your cat have small amounts without any allergic reactions, I would think it is safe to assume that he is not allergic. Coconut oil has many benefits for cats and ...


29

Meat is meat. All cats have roughly the same digestive system and metabolism, so their choice of prey is more about size than nutrition. It needs to be a large enough meal to justify the effort of hunting it yet small enough they're likely to be successful. A large enough pride of lions can take down enormous prey like buffalo, giraffe or even elephant. ...


27

Short answer: No. Cats are obligate carnivores. Note the "obligate". While they can process and obtain nutrition from some vegetable/plant matter, they cannot receive or produce all the nutrients they need this way. Omnivores (like humans and dogs and many others) have certain metabolic pathways available to them that mean that they can make use of both ...


26

Firstly, free feeding dry food is the fastest way to turn any cat into an overweight cat. Your vet's advice is wildly wrong in this case. Hill's (a respected pet food company) has this to say: Free feeding cats can lead to overeating and obesity. It can also be difficult to tell if your cat's appetite has changed, for the better or worse. It's also ...


25

You got most of the points right. The sugar is added to cat food for the benefit of the manufacturer, not for the cat. Cats cannot taste sweet You need 2 specific genes in order to have receptors for sweet tastes on your tongue, but cats lack one of those genes. [Joe Brand, biochemist and associate director at the Monell Chemical Senses Center in ...


25

Do NOT feed your cat chicken liver daily. Liver contains a lot of vitamin A, which is possible for cats to overdose on. This is called vitamin A toxicity. The toxicity will slowly build up over time, so consumption of foods very high in vitamin A should be limited overall, and not just limited to not eating too much in one meal. Furthermore, I would be ...


24

According to petpoisonhelpline.com, caffeine poisoning is "[g]enerally moderate to severe/life-threatening", but while "[...] cats appear to be more sensitive to the effects of caffeine than people", "1-2 laps of coffee, tea or soda will not contain enough caffeine to cause poisoning in most pets [...]". So you should be safe with the current situation, but ...


22

Yes, there is something inherently repulsive in snails: their slime, which is sticky and sometimes stinks or tastes bad. Snails not only produce it to slither over surfaces, when they are attacked or injured, they produce lots of it as a defensive mechanism, relying on the attacker being grossed out by the sticky slime in their mouth. Most animals find it ...


20

Well first, bear in mind that a cats natural diet is carnivorous and that type of diet is seldom dried pellets. :) In general, dry and wet food options are, these days, quite on par in terms of nutritional quality. In the past, there could be complications from some varieties of foods containing high quantities of ash that could lead to kidney failure (we ...


19

The answer is the same as it is with people. It depends on the dog. I grew up doing the same thing you did. We'd simply refill the bowl when it got empty. It was fine with our first lab. She was leaning more toward heavy than skinny, but was a decent weight. My second lab turned into a butter ball. I had a knock down drag out with my parents at the time, ...


19

It's not really true - at the physiological level, I certainly cannot see how prolonged consumption of processed food could disable a cat from being able to digest natural food. However, I could see the trace element of truth in this statement's essence, which might explain it's plausible origin. Cats, compared to dogs, are known to be a bit of picky eaters. ...


18

Cats require an amino acid called Taurine, since they are unable to synthesize it themselves. This particular amino acid is only found naturally in animal tissue. Because Taurine is destroyed by heat, a Taurine supplement is added to commercial food. There are vegan websites that claim you can give your cat a vegan diet, however it may not be appropriate ...


18

(I see that your situation has resolved itself, but I want to talk a bit about cat anorexia and fatty liver disease because it can be a real problem). Cats can stop eating for a variety of reasons. They ate a bug, they have a hairball making them feel weird, they're stressed, they have a cold, there are a ton of reasons. Feline Hepatic Lipidosis The main ...


17

It's probably fine but you should definitely monitor your cat's weight. If she is walking away herself then she can probably control herself. If you are worried why not measure out the correct daily amount every morning then only feed her from that. Over eating or under eating is sometimes the first indication you have that your cat is sick. Using this ...


16

If your cat is not eating at or near a normal diet the following morning, a call to the vet is definitely in order. You know your pet, and if their diet is significantly changed for more then 24-36 hours a vet exam is indicated. Note that for some herbivores like rabbits, diet disruption gets critical in less than 24 hours.


16

Short answer is that he'll be fine. Dogs are primarily scavengers and not quite the hunters we used to think they were, though they're still predators and have some of those instincts. What that means, though, is that the dogs are capable of eating much more riskier foods as much of what they will eat will not be fresh kill (carrion). The acidity level of ...


16

I would avoid giving cows milk as there is a good chance the kitten will be lactose intolerant. Stick to kitten/cat milk such as Whiskas Kitten Milk or goats milk in a pinch. The meat balls might not be the best - if they are intended for human consumption then it may contain higher levels of salt than is healthy for a kitten and may be lacking in nutrients ...


16

Actual natural yogurt's something that dogs in India have had as part of their diet for ages. Its worth remembering there's bad things about it - its milk based, and somewhat fatty (and if your dog is lactose intolerant, very bad things can happen) and good (it has lots of good, natural probiotics). A lot of store bought yogurt is terrible. The stuff with ...


15

Here are some of the factors to consider before switching your cat to a live food diet. Legality In some jurisdictions it is illegal to feed live mice (or illegal to feed live food when the animal will eat dead food). The laws are generally written with reptiles in mind, but may apply to cats depending on how they are written. Willingness of your cat to ...


15

The short answer is "yes". The longer answer is yes, a cat can be fine on a diet of only dry food. Most of the dry food brands are formulated to contain all the nutrients a cat needs. The main thing to be careful of is that cats tend not to drink enough (since in the wild they get most of the liquid they need from their prey) so you do need to make sure ...


14

We buy crickets regularly for two frogs, and we have purchased crickets from two local pet stores. Every batch of crickets we have purchased from one of the pet stores is noisy, chirping like crazy. Every batch of crickets we have purchased from the other pet store is essentially silent. As a result, we now only purchase crickets from the store with non-...


14

Cats can stop eating for a variety of reasons. They ate a bug, they have a hairball making them feel weird, they're stressed, they have a cold, there are a ton of reasons. Feline Hepatic Lipidosis The main danger when a cat stops eating is feline hepatic lipidosis, commonly called fatty liver disease. The exact mechanism by which fasting in a ...


14

It's just their play/hunt instinct kicking in. The piece of food might have dropped outside the bowl, cat uses a paw to get it free (to take it), then notices "omgosh! it's moving!" and starts to "hunt" the food. Nothing abnormal here and I wouldn't expect this to be just due to the cat being bored. Especially if the other cat sees the hunt, it will join in,...


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