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8

In short, no. Cat breeds are bred primarily based on looks, then health, then mental stability. Intelligence doesn't come into the picture at all. That being said, the Siamese/Oriental class seems to be generally the most intelligent, although they aren't specifically bred to be smart -- they just happen to be. On the other hand, intelligence as you're ...


6

While there might be an argument made for yes, I go with a strong NO, don't do it if you love your cat! According to multiple websites it is not a good idea to have a dog with a high prey drive and other pets in the same house. Those dogs will kill those other pets if they can. And husky's can have a very high drive. Now, it can be done, having a husky ...


6

kratzallergy.com says: If the rabbit also causes an allergy, you might consider a smaller pet. A guinea pig is a fairly safe bet for most people with allergies. If you find that a regular guinea pig causes some allergy symptoms, you might opt for a hairless guinea pig. Hairless guinea pigs actually do have hair that some people call peach fuzz. The lack of ...


6

Could anyone recommend a breed? Breed doesn't always tell you everything you need to know about a dog, but it can give you a helpful understanding of the general needs and some characteristics that are to be expected. Without more information on what you're looking for, I can't recommend a breed, but I can give you some insights on how you can choose one by ...


5

There are some breeds that have the tendency to bark a lot - mostly guarding and herding breeds, but also many smaller breeds categorized as "toy breeds". Dog breeds that bark a lot include: Beagle, Chihuahua, Pomeranian, Siberian Husky, Yorkshire Terrier, West Highland White Terrier (and most other terriers), Border Collie, German Shepherd, ...


5

Color of whiskers isn't set in stone, nor is their transition. Some cats start black, other cats start white (one of our current cats has black whiskers at age 1, the others have white whiskers at age 1). I've had a cat who kept white whiskers to the day she died (age 21). There's likely no guaranteed answer here, only an average approximation.


5

Your cat will not grow up to be a monster when it comes to size; there is some natural variation in the size of cats. Females are often smaller than males. Female cats that get small litters do often get bigger kittens, so it might simply be that he has a head start when it comes to size. The normal birth weight of kittens is 80-170 grams (about 3-6 ounces), ...


5

It is very hard to answer questions about shedding in cats as it is very variable in the different breeds. Some cats will shed fur more or less continuously over the year and other cats will shed mostly in the spring and autumn. When you brush your cat during shedding the amount of fur you get off from your cat can be amazing (it looks like you will have ...


4

First of all, dogs are dogs. The all have the same basic needs. And every dog can be trained. And even dogs of the same breed can be really different in behavior and character. But, you are right, not every breed is equally suitable for every task or life circumstances and the purebreeds are known for unique qualities. I want to bring the dog to a small (...


4

People adopt mutts all the time, so I don't see this as much different. In which case, you try to make an educated guess as to the dog's needs, and home it appropriately. However, knowing the parent dogs gives you more information about what the dog's needs are. Since the parents are used as herding dogs, I would say a small apartment will not be an ...


4

I hadn't heard this phrase before so I had to look it up. In short, it seems to be a sort of wive's tale based on an understanding that some collies are sensitive to certain medications, and in turn associated with those collies having white feet. I don't know if there's any supporting evidence that the gene that produces white feet in dogs is related to the ...


4

You can't be sure that this cat is a 100% Manx, even if he looks like it, because there are no papers and you don't know his parents. You can suggest that he has some Manx blood, but you don't know if he is really a pure blood. No reputable breeder would admit him into his breeding program because of this. So correct is to call him an unknown breed. But you ...


4

We've cared for and loved a paraplegic dog for around five years now. The accident that caused the paraplegia occurred when he was eleven years old and he is now sixteen years old. He has aged quickly in the last three months, we believe largely due to a diagnosis of lymphoma. So our wonderful companion is close to the end of his extraordinary life. He ...


4

I have a three-legged cat named Meko, so I can answer from the handicap perspective. With my own cats and other cats that she's run into, I've noticed that her handicap makes other cats a lot nicer to her, almost like they are mothering her? I have three other cats in addition to Meko, and I have noticed that the other cats seem to like to take care of her. ...


4

From your descriptions, I think it's mostly just a personality difference than having to do with the species they were hybridized from. Bengals are hybrids between Asian Leopard Cats and domestic cats, specifically the Egyptian Mau. Savannah cats are a hybrid between servals and domestic cats of various breeds, sometimes even including Bengals. Both Asian ...


4

In my opinion, the easiest way to ask what kind of dog someone owns is to ask exactly that, ie: 'Oh, you have a dog? What kind?' (or 'What kind is he/she?' if you know the sex.) If you ask what 'kind' of dog it is you're not seen to be asking specifically about breed, pedigree, or anything like that. That way the owner can just as easily say 'he's a pure-...


4

Guarding a farm or property is one of the fundamental tasks certain dogs were historically bred to execute. Guarding a farm or a herd of sheep from wild predators or human thieves was existential for the farmer or shepherd. The dogs job never was actually attacking the intruder - be it a human or wolf, for example - but to bark and either scare the intruder ...


4

I wouldn't risk it, but as always, there's no simple yes or no. Every dog has their own personality, just like humans. Your dog could be very playful or very lazy, regardless of breed. But in general the breed does have a certain influence. German shepherds are a working breed. If they don't have anything to do (read: if you don't do enough training, playing ...


3

It sort of depends on what your intent is. You can expect dog feces to be highly contaminated with DNA not from the dog, and therefore I would guess that you probably couldn't get a truly accurate DNA profile of the dog that way. However, if you already have accurate DNA profiles of dogs from mouth swabs, you may be able to get enough DNA from the feces to ...


3

*Disclaimer - I’m not an expert in identifying breeds. But I have 2 shepherds. This dog appears to be a shepherd or have shepherd in it. It looks similar to mine when they where pups. And you are correct, the ears will rise with age. However there are a couple of things: Papers and evidence of lineage will tell, things like if it is registered with ...


3

Apparently there's a formal distinction between a double and single coat: A dog's coat may be a double coat, made up of a soft undercoat and a coarser topcoat, or a single coat, which lacks an undercoat. However: The terms fur and hair are often used interchangeably when describing a dog's coat, however in general, a double coat, e.g., like that of ...


3

Genetics, Yes: The genetics test you have linked shows the following: over 250 breeds. The problem is very likely in the methodology (way they try to figure out the breed). This is because all dogs, if size would not be a problem, can breed. It is still one species. Even a wolf can breed with, say a labradoodle, and produce fertile offspring (just not a ...


3

Puppies tend to gnaw on things for various reasons. The simplest thing is really, they don't know better. It takes time to train a puppy to know some things are wrong. A good strong no, and seperating the pup from the thing she's chewing on (and lots of positive reinforcement) for the right sort of chewing is good. She might also be bored. Keep her ...


3

The fur on the belly of cats is about the same as on the rest of the body, but the combination of loose skin and gravity, and the fact that the fur stands straight out, makes it look longer. Male and female cats have about the same amount and length of fur on the belly; lactating cats have a bit less fur in the area around the nipples, but the fur length is ...


3

Could anyone recommend a breed? No. Because the breed does not define the character of the dog. It's true that certain breeds have certain characteristics. For example Border Collies or Australian Shepherds are in general extremely high energy breeds that are completely unsuited for a first time dog owner. Traditional hunting breeds, like Terriers and ...


2

To the contrary, breeding for temperament (a common goal) clearly reduces intelligence. Wild felids (and canines) have larger brains than closely related domestic ones, and they show more signs of intelligence as well. This is not surprising since wild cats need to work much harder to survive than a pampered pet or even feral cat. Bengals, Savannahs and ...


2

That's like saying "I don't like brunettes. Why aren't they extinct yet?" People have different tastes and prefer different looks in dogs. All these dogs originate from different regions and are traditionally used in those regions All of them declined in numbers quite drastically until they found a new field of application in wars or police service There ...


2

Pedigree Papers If you got your cat from a registered cattery, then the breeder should have provided you pedigree papers establishing its breed. If sold as a kitten, the breeder may withhold the papers until you provide proof of spay/neuter; see your sales contract for details. This is the only certain proof that a cat is of a particular breed. Breed ...


2

Labradors and retrievers are not really barking dogs. Keep in mind no matter what breed you get, they all have the instinct to bark. Some more than others, it just depends on their personality. My boxer doesn’t bark much. My English bulldog does as a guard dog and my boxer bulldog mix doesn’t bark much at all.


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