11

In short, no. Tortoises and hamsters have different needs for their habitats. While some hamsters might live in the desert in the wild, any hamster you buy in the store will have been bred inside for so long that, among other things, they've evolved to live at a normal room temperature (60-75 °F / 16-24 °C). Meanwhile tortoises simply ...


9

You indicate in your comments that your hamster does not have any hay, but it does have an 'absolutely massive rotastak system'. Hamsters are much like rabbits in that their teeth grow constantly. Unlike for rabbits there are not a lot of quality references available on the internet. This is the best reference I found. Let's just say that hamsters need hay ...


8

If the hamster is constantly trying to get out, this could be a sign that the cage is too small. In my personal experience I've seen several hamsters with negative behaviour traits (aggression and/or constant bar chewing) have their behaviour improve after being moved to a larger cage. I did have one hamster who would bar chew regardless of cage size;I have ...


8

Hamsters are desert animals and are built to live in an environment with a lot less moisture in it. That leads to a couple of considerations: They need to be warm. Despite the fur, they're not a cold temperature animal and so are vulnerable to cold. They're not naturally water creatures, given desert origins, and so one wouldn't expect to bathe in water. ...


8

Long to short: one drop of chocolate ice cream is not enough to harm your hamster. The dangerous thing in chocolate is called "Theobromin". (look at this question for more detail: Does chocolate hurt hamsters?) How much theobromin can a hamster eat without damage? I have found an science article about dangerous dose of Theobromine for rats, mouse and ...


7

Airplanes maintain air pressure in both the passenger cabin and the cargo hold. The reason for the passenger cabin is obviously health and safety of the passengers, but in the cargo hold it is for various goods and, possibly, animals that might be in it that also require pressure. Near vacuum isn't really a good thing for pressurized containers often carried ...


6

Hamsters are nocturnal (or crepuscular, according to the linked source). That is why it is awake at night, and therefore there is not much you can do about its activity. When I was a child, I had a hamster, and I recall this behaviour very well. Our solution was to move him to another room, and put a blanket over the cage to muffle the noise. So that would ...


6

It depends on the breed of hamster. If it is a Syrian hamster, its cage needs to be at least 360 square inches of floor space or more (12 inches by 30 inches). But if it's a Chinese hamster, or any of the dwarf breeds, it needs 288 square inches or more (12 inches by 24 inches, or 1 foot by 2 feet). Make sure to add lots of toys such as tubes, hideouts, ...


6

I suppose it's possible that there's an allergy at play here but I'd be looking for a more likely cause first. Has the cat been checked/treated for fleas? Fleas, mites or ticks can transfer from cats to hamsters and that would certainly cause the scratching behavior you see.


6

Cotton Wool Dangers There are some dangers to cotton wool such as: Ingestion - Intestinal blockage Limbs can get tangeled Hamsters LOVE to burrow so having a substrate where they can dig and hide is best. It acts as environmental enrichment as well as a safe place to hide. Layna has added a nice list of burrowing/bedding materials however I would only ...


5

So... First, a quick biology lesson on cones and rods. Rods are photoreceptive cells that are very light responsive and are responsible for most night vision capability. However, very dim light results in colorless vision and rods don't capture color. Cones are photoreceptive cells that are bright light responsive and are responsible for most color vision ...


5

Cages do need to be rather large. Buying typical pet store cages is generally a bad idea. Most of them (at least at my pet store) are far too small and even unsafe for our hamsters. Many pet companies are only in it for the money, not the safety and welfare of our pets. Many people recommend cages as small as 24x12 inch cages, but many experienced owners ...


4

I can't answer every question, but I can tell you that in order to play in the ball the ball has to be at least six inches in diameter for dwarf hamsters and at least eight inches for Syrians to help prevent back arches. Also, don't leave your hamster in there for too long. For starters, he might leave droppings in the ball or around the floor and even wee ...


4

I have had this issue too, and as my hamster is in my room it is stressful at night. But I found out that if you simply collect cardboard toilet tubes, etc. and give them to him, he may stop. But if he doesn't, I would go to a store like Pets at Home and ask them for an easy and quick solution. Hope my answer helped.


4

If anyone is interested in an answer here. Took the little guy to the vet and it turns out that this was a is bit gunk inside the umbilical cord cavity which can happen from time to time. The vet cleaned him up with a little cotton swab and dettol (savlon) disinfectant. All came off. Skin looks good... So just a tip to hamster owners out there. Keep an eye ...


4

Hamsters are solitary animals and should never be housed together - they will kill and eat one another. Babies can be housed together temporarily but should be separated when they hit sexual maturity (~4-5 weeks). There is the odd case where some hamsters will get along as adults however they tend to one day change their minds and kill their cage-mate. I'...


4

I wouldn't say the possibility of bond is gone. I hate to say this, because I want to be as positive as possible, but when I worked at a pet store there were 2 things we for sure ALWAYS recommended when taking a hamster home: 1) don't hold him on the first night, so he/she doesn't associate you with the stress or become more stressed and 2) don't hand feed ...


4

I am going by the numbers German pet-experts give; those are numbers for "this hamster will be really really happy", not "the hamster can manage with this", and are way above what the average store would ever give you. Good thing about Hamsters and connected cages: they like tunnels anyway, so expansion is quiet manageable. What worries me about the cage ...


4

Of the options you listed cat seems to be the obvious answer, they are reasonably independent and quite a lot of them will enjoy a good cuddle. I don't want to be rude or insensitive as I don't know your full situation but if you went for a long haired breed such as a ragdoll, or birman then they are like a nice warm fluffy teddy bear and you might enjoy ...


4

Ok, I checked my best source for small animal Keeping (German site: Die Brain) What they advise is: Hay Straw Toilet paper (Shredded) paper (Make sure it has no chemicals on it, the more natural, the better) Dried leaves hemp Cotton is explicitly NOT recommeded! Anything that the hamster can get tangled in should be avoided. But as Toilet Paper made the ...


4

I do know very little about hamsters but i know dandelions and cat grass/wheat grass is safe for hamsters. I found this information on the net http://www.petwebsite.com/hamsters/hamster_plants_flowers.asp Alyssum Asters Bramble leaves Blackberry leaves Burnet Chickweed Clover Coltsfoot Cornflowers Cow Parsley ...


4

In nature hamsters have a variety of food to choose from. They eat almost anything that they could get: seeds, grains, herbs, fruits, vegetables, insects and also small mammals. But the winter season is an exception, as that's when they eat mostly dry food - it's because it is more easily storable. Not a good food is all with sugar, honey or molasses. ...


3

Litter training a hamster is possible, though often hit or miss as they are not the most intelligent creatures on the tree of life. Some are receptive to training, others not. You should notice that your hamster naturally urinates in a certain area, whether it be a corner of the cage or a box you originally bought as a sleep box, in which case that is ...


3

Do NOT give him a Hamster ball. The Hamster cannot really control the ball, because any ball that has a size the Hamster could properly walk in (without a permanently bent spine) automatically is way too heavy for the Hamster to control. As Alivia pointed out it will become dirty. It is highly unnatural "ground" fro a Hamster to walk on. And it prevent the ...


3

Actually hamsters are crepuscular which means they are more active in the morning and evening. Tending to nap during the day and at night. I can't speak specifically to hamsters, but we have rabbits which are also crepuscular. Part of being a family is adjusting. Each individual (human or not) has a personality, we all adjust to each other. ...


3

If you do get a cat, some of your requirements point to different age recommendations, so you should figure out what in your list is a higher priority. If low maintenance/cuddling is your top priority, I would highly recommend an older cat (at least 5 years) over a kitten or young adult. An older cat is going to be lower energy and require less attention (...


3

Hamsters cannot see this wavelenghth of infrared radiation. The vision of hamsters is shifted more to the ultraviolet part of the light spectrum. This means they see best in the blue to green light and are less sensitive to red and infrared light. The infrared LED diodes on the LED board you ask about have an output of 3 watts in the 940 nanometer wavelength....


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