Hot answers tagged

19

Chaining a dog is not good in general and might increase the problem in this case. Your dog is young and full of energy. If she's bored, she entertains herself by chewing on things. Playing with her and taking long walks is a better way to entertain her. With some training, you could ride a bike or skateboard or roller skates and have your dog run with you. ...


16

"Buy a new pair of shoes and a woodworks lathe." said an old man to me when I went about asking what and how should I prepare for my first dog (puppy). I said I can imagine why the shoes, but what's the lathe for? His prompt answer was "you see, it is not nice to walk barefoot to a shoes dealer; that's why you buy the new shoes now and hid them somewhere ...


12

At 3 months old it's probably teething. But Labradors will chew anything and everything, it's just something that comes with the breed. My Labrador I had as a kid chewed a hole through the wall of our wooden shed and then chased a possum through it one night. Her favorite thing to chew on were these rawhide bone donuts: (Source) Probably because those were ...


11

Hide them! Take them somewhere high, on a bookshelf for example, where the dog cannot reach them.


9

Contrary to what I've implied in "How to use a spray bottle as negative reinforcement?" this is one exception of the case. I have not used a spray bottle, but instead I've kept a glass filled with very small amount of water near the place(s) where my kittens have liked to play with electrical wires. When I noticed anyone of them playing with wires I've ...


9

Two small things before I start: You have a pup. Puppies at her age are beginning to feel pain in their teeth as new teeth begin to push out the old ones. Remember that teething is a way for her to ease the pain -- she's not trying to be a bad dog. Puppies will teeth for the sake of easing pain until they're developed -- then they'll do it for fun. This is ...


9

You indicate in your comments that your hamster does not have any hay, but it does have an 'absolutely massive rotastak system'. Hamsters are much like rabbits in that their teeth grow constantly. Unlike for rabbits there are not a lot of quality references available on the internet. This is the best reference I found. Let's just say that hamsters need hay ...


8

Most cats find citrus oils offensive. Rub the outer part of citrus peels against the wires. Or if you want more bang you can get the essence (peel oil) of bitter orange and put that on it. That should ward the cat off.


8

Chewing cardboard, amongst other things, can be a sign of pica in cats. Basically, this is an eating disorder that could be a consequence of dietary deficiencies or cognitive dysfunction (old age, senility), and some others. This isn't entirely normal, though not all that uncommon, so it would be a good idea to get him checked out by a vet to make sure that ...


7

I used Grannick's Bitter Apple spray when I first got my puppy. I'd spray a bit on the shoe while he was chewing it/about to grab it, then when he was making that "I don't like this taste face" I would quietly take the shoe away and put a toy in front of him right where it was. Only took a few days for him to get the idea.


7

Maybe your dog needs something to chew on. An artificial bone might cater his needs. I used the bones that are available for dogs at the pet store and his chewing on other things has reduced considerably.


7

What's worked very well for me is a combination of a few things. I limit the amount of wires the ferrets actually have access to. The power-strip for the television is hung on the underside of the table with large command strips. The table is a little over two feet high and I don't put anything under it so the ferrets would never be able to jump/climb up ...


6

I don't think your dog destroying his toys means that he doesn't get enough exercise. I think it's just something he enjoys doing that helps satisfy his need for mental stimulation. My dog is also super high energy and even when I tire her out mentally and physically (11 mile hike after 3 days in a row of multi-hour dog park visits, having to get her dinner ...


6

3 month old lab pups should be contained in a crate or pen when they are not supervised. Use bitter apple as a taste deterrent on the legs of the table, if that is where the pup seems to want to focus. Substitute appropriate chew toys if the pup goes for the table leg. Other fun things to give them to chew on: ice cubes - or a large ice cube made in a ...


6

First of all your bf needs to step up and take ownership. It is his dog and your house. Your bf should shut the door. Your bf should place the dog on the floor. You bf should not let the dog stare you down. He is telling the dog this is acceptable behavior. He should not defer discipline / training to you. You may need to get help with a ...


6

I'll let my answer be more food for thought than an outright answer, because you're already doing a few of the things I'd be trying, such as putting her off the furniture when she "claims" your boyfriend. I'll also agree with Frisbee. I think this dog displays more fearful tendencies than aggressive ones. Rolling over and peeing on herself strongly tells me ...


5

First I would not trying to make wires (or anything) unpalatable. I am not sure anyone knows for sure why rabbits chew electrical wires, but they do. I have had first person accounts of electrified wires killing house rabbits (so that makes this a second hand report). Physical separation of the rabbits and the wires is required. Wires laying on the ...


5

Active training. Get a case of cheap earbuds and expose the dog to them under supervision, actively teaching *No! Not yours, do not touch!" Works for me with cats. Note: I don't think you told us the dog's age. Puppies chew, period; it's the human's responsibility to direct that to appropriate chew toys.


4

TL;DR No one else has mentioned this, but dissection is often cited as part of a carnivore's prey drive. This is most often discussed in dogs, e.g. Predatory Behavior in Dogs, but is likely to be relevant to other predatory species likes cats. It is possible that your cat's observable behavior is a form of play, which often contains components of the ...


4

The method I would use is to simply make the shoes taste bad to discourage your dog from putting them into their mouths in the first place. It might not help you the instant that your dog first tries chewing on your shoes, but it would ensure that he wouldn't consider them something he can chew again. Think about it this way, It will make him think twice ...


4

I have had this issue too, and as my hamster is in my room it is stressful at night. But I found out that if you simply collect cardboard toilet tubes, etc. and give them to him, he may stop. But if he doesn't, I would go to a store like Pets at Home and ask them for an easy and quick solution. Hope my answer helped.


4

Ah yes, I had that problem with some of my cats, years ago. If you have a sewing machine, you can create fabric "sleeves" for the cords. They should be loose-fitting tubes, wide enough to fit the plug through. You might think you should use thick fabric to protect the cord, but I actually recommend you use thin fabric, perhaps something fuzzy like flannel. ...


4

Sorry if I have bad English writing, that's not my native language. An adult dog might be chewing for many reasons: Anxiety/loneliness To call your attention A natural need for chewing Since he lost interest in kong and toys, your case seems to be the first two. His behavior when you say: We leave his toys in the lounge when we leave, which he grabs as ...


4

http://cats.about.com/od/catsafety/a/SafeHalloween.htm Pumpkin itself isn't toxic, but if the pumpkin's been sitting out, it could harbor germs that will make your animal sick. Also, if the cat does eat the pumpkin, pumpkin contains fiber that could act as a laxative (though this is a possible benefit if your cat is constipated). In conclusion, I wouldn't ...


4

8 months old is still a puppy, and puppies need to chew as their teeth and jaws are developing. IMHO, 8 months is too young to leave them alone, unsupervised and unconfined. Make the Kong toy more interesting: fill it with treats and peanut butter, almond butter or yogurt. Freezing it makes it last even longer. Then give that to your puppy in a crate when ...


4

Cats have a natural need to climb in the wild - to literally save their life against predators and allow them to see to hunt - and without other alternatives they will ignore arbitrary rules. A better way of thinking is to provide an acceptable alternative to something you don't like...like in this case a cat tree, or a good scratch post to keep a cat from ...


4

Variety is the spice of life, even for dogs. Keep her busy and entertained by alternating the types of chew toys she gets every day. Here's a few more options: A Kong Toy - These are super durable rubber toys that are hollow on the inside. You can fill them with a bit of peanut butter or other food, which will keep your dog busy all day. The website has a ...


4

Some animals are OCD for eating things and cannot be conditioned otherwise , a vet I work with has a cat like that who we've done multiple foreign body surgeries on. First thing I would do is get pet insurance that will cover foreign body surgeries, they aren't cheap and with a dog like yours it will happen. Secondly I suggest buying a basket muzzle, I'...


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