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22

Supervised outdoor time is fine, provided that you take adequate precautions to ensure that the cat stays supervised. We've let our cats out onto enclosed balconies, and an enclosed screened-in porch, and they clearly enjoyed it (well, 2 of the 3). A cat harness, such as John Cavan suggests, is also a good solution, although some cats will not handle any ...


19

One of our cats loves going outside, but we've seen too many animals killed by traffic to let him do it freely. So, our solution to this was to get a cat harness and a long yard chain designed for small dogs. This lets him explore, eat some grass, hunt some bugs, and the like while being restricted from roaming totally free. He likes it so much that he purrs ...


14

This will be an unpopular answer, but here goes. We had a small farm as a young family, partly because I am an animal lover, and partly to teach my children the true cost of their food (and I'm not referring to money; I'm referring to captive and lost lives.) Once while awaiting pickup of a grain order, the man in front of us heard my kids talking about ...


12

My cat also went through a stage (of about 5 years) where she caught and killed everything in our garden and brought it home. The only thing that worked was to tire her out by playing games with toys and a laser pointer during the evening before bed. Then she was too tired to go out and her passion for hunting was also satisfied with the toys. It was hard ...


9

I have had dogs that loved being on a cable and I have had dogs that hated it. The placement of the cable, the personality and breed of your dog are very important. I had a German Shepherd who we once tried to put on a cable. He hated it so much he tore it off the side of the house. We got an electric fence after that, but that did not work either. We ended ...


9

TL;DR You have a conflict where your neighbor's self-interest and yours don't seem to align. You also have a moral responsibility to take preventive action before your dogs are hurt, rather than punitive action after the fact. You have options; they're just not the ones you want. Analysis and Recommendations The neighbor refuses to train or keep the ...


9

Cats should be indoors only, or supervised outdoors You are right to be concerned about letting your cat outside unsupervised. Keeping your cats indoors protects against MANY problems that can make your cat sick or die! According to the American Humane Society, cats who are either part-time or full-time allowed to roam outdoors alone face the following ...


9

Well, as you noted, dogs can eat a lot of things that would kill a human and, given that they're scavengers by nature, will find them to eat. However, mushroom poisoning in dogs is a very frequent event and many dogs die from it every year as a result of consuming dangerous mushrooms in the wild. Long story short, the evidence would suggest that dogs cannot ...


9

My family has good experiences with adopting young feral cats, but admittedly we kept them in the house for a few weeks to make them associate our house with their new home. Compared to getting an in-house cat, there are several differences to this approach. You need a place to lock it up for a few days or weeks to get it used to living with you. A tool ...


8

It really depends on where you live and on the dog (breed/coat, age, health, personality). Each dog is different and has different needs. Some dogs can withstand the cold, but really hate it and should not be forced to endure it. Puppies should never be exposed to the cold for extended periods. Adult labs will be fine, just make sure to give them extra food ...


8

An enclosure is really the only option if you want to let them out without a harness and leash. You can't just let a cat out and watch them not to run away. They will run away faster than you realize, if there's any chance at all. After the fact all you can do is wait and hope they'll come back later. An adult indoor cat is probably scared of the outside ...


7

A basic search online against "GPS electric fence" using any given search engine reveals several brands of electric fences using GPS technology vs. using wireless technology. Here is a video explaining the technology. In my experience with GPS, there is too much delay, variance, false positives, inaccuracy, and unreliability. That being said, I have NO ...


6

My partner had a similar problem with a bird enclosure and a local company recommended she use a fairly heavy mesh that worked well and solved the problem. The following Garden Zone 403010 1/2" x 1" Mesh 16-Gauge Galvanized Wire Fence available on Amazon looks pretty similar. It was fairly tedious but I left a little overlap on the inside and tacked the wire ...


6

You're right to be cautious. Run over, run away, injured, made sick... are all likely outcomes. Good luck finding a safe place to take your cat out to. I have seen people take their cats out, a closed garden area sounds like a good option if you can find one... again that doesn't rule out something bad happening involving another dog, cat, or other animal ...


6

As I see it there are two similar issues here. a) Stopping your dogs going next door is your problem. If your dogs get torn to pieces next door, that should be on your conscience, not your neighbours. b) Likewise, your neighbour has responsibility to stop his dogs coming into your yard. Until you can stop your dog(s) going over the road, I doubt there's ...


5

I would be very careful and not overdo it. If your puppies have been exclusively indoors, their fur differs from an outside dog. Outside dogs have greasier fur to protect against moisture and they get used to the lower temperatures gradually. You should at least put up a small tent for all three of you to bunch together at night for warmth. That also ...


5

Even though @Elmy has a point I am going to assume that you are worried stray cats might hurt your rabbits. This is definitely something you should mind. Cats can prey on pet rabbits. In my experience you should keep your outside rabbits in a cat save enclosure, especially if you know there are cats around. Something like this save rabbit enclosure or this ...


5

There are several aspects you need to consider, including: Breed Traditional herding and guard breeds were bred exactly for your purpose: to protect familiar individuals (animals or humans) from potentially dangerous individuals (animals or humans). Different sites offer different lists and classifications of breeds, like the American Kennel Club. A mixed ...


4

Vaseline works just fine. A dab on the paws before bed and a dab before walks. If you want I'd shop for one but you can make homemade moisturizers for your dog. Shea butter Lavender oil (Lavendula augustifolia) (I chose this because of its calming healing properties) Vitamin E oil Beeswax Olive oil. Pure. Organic. Extra Virgin Little metal ...


4

As long as the weather doesn't get too cold, and sunshine is not continously absent, then your tortoise should be okay outside. I remember from the last question your tortoise was a red foot tortoise, which naturally lives in rainforests. The high humidity level caused by the rain shouldn't be a problem for a rainforest tortoise. On the other hand, in ...


4

As I understand things, by paying for your vet bills, your neighbor has admitted that his dogs are dangerous - you should be able to take all the documentary evidence you have (you did keep it all, didn't you?) to your local animal control and/or law enforcement (depending on jurisdiction) and request that your neighbor be required to keep his dogs ...


4

Stating like the others, that I am not a lawyer and not even a US citizen: For solid legal advice see a lawyer. However I still wish to outline something: If your neighbour's dogs are attacking yours that is property damage. Animals are things and even if not they're clearly not persons, so specific laws about trespassing might be hard to apply. (...


4

That's very sad. For such risky "behaviours" prevention is very important and whatever training you might do the risk will always be present. Nevertheless, it might be very interesting to try simple classical conditioning, aka. Pavlov conditioning. You start training the kitten as soon as possible, once or a few times a day. Depending on the house, you ...


4

Electric dog fences are really only safe for dogs that don't really need fencing. An excited dog who sees another dog, a squirrel, a cat, is liable to run right through the electric fence, and will then be stuck outside it unable to get home again. They can be very dangerous for this reason. They also don't protect your dog from anything that might come ...


4

There's likely very little you can do to prevent a cat from getting into a place it has its mind set on getting into. Cats are agile, athletic, and acrobatic. Making your fence unclimbable won't accomplish anything, and a jump into your yard from a high location (nearby tree, or roof) likely won't faze a cat. Considering that cats can walk between sharp, ...


4

For starters, I have never owned a cat so I'm not experienced in this field but there are a lot of cats in my area. I have seen quite some people who attach wooden stairs to the outside wall of their houses to let the cats in through a window or balcony. Here are some examples of what that could look like: There are several of these that you can buy ...


4

It might be a case of overstimulation. If she's used to looking out a closed window, she's used to the visual input alone and very muted sounds. Now that the window is opened, she gets the usual visual input accompanied by much louder sounds, many different smells, the sensation of airflow and probably much more sensual input than we humans are aware of. ...


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