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32

If she’s behaving completely normally (other than probably avoiding your dad) rather than hiding, walking funny or being lethargic, she’s probably fine. I’d keep an eye on her for the next couple days and take her to a vet if you see any strange behavior, but if she’s running and playing as usual, it doesn’t sound like she was hurt.


29

If I were in your shoes, I would not let the cat go outside. It is just my personal opinion based on safety, though - and I'm saying this as a person who thinks that indoor cats are indeed missing an important, but non-essential aspect of their lives. Also, I tend to get deeply bonded with all the pets I'm taking care for, maybe too much, or maybe not - thus ...


25

Firstly, free feeding dry food is the fastest way to turn any cat into an overweight cat. Your vet's advice is wildly wrong in this case. Hill's (a respected pet food company) has this to say: Free feeding cats can lead to overeating and obesity. It can also be difficult to tell if your cat's appetite has changed, for the better or worse. It's also ...


24

It is one of the most common behaviour in cats. Cats normally do not just follow you to the bathroom, they usually follow their human companion to everywhere. But cats following us to the bathroom is more noticeable, hence the confirmation bias. Cats following humans can be due to a variety of reasons. They might be spooked by something you can't see or hear,...


23

To start, any time a cat is not urinating, it's urgent to get them to a vet ASAP. While urinary issues typically affect older (and neutered male) cats, any cat can suffer urinary tract issues which can become serious to fatal, and even less serious cases can result in long-term behavioral issues, such as litterbox avoidance. Secondarily, it sounds as though ...


23

You need to break the existing conditioning your cat has at the moment. The classic approach would be to close the door and immediately open it again. Then slowly increase the time that the cat will accept the closed door. Make sure you always open the door before he starts to fuss and complain and by all means before he freaks out - or you’ll likely start ...


22

Buy a cat harness and take him out on supervised walks on a leash. Cat harnesses are a simple, affordable method for a cat owner to take their cat outdoors and let them explore in a safe, supervised fashion, and also minimize the risk that they'll kill innocent wild animals. Just put it on him periodically around the house to get him used to it, then attach ...


21

Cats are surprisingly sturdy creatures. By your description, she doesn't appear to act anyway out of normal. She moves normally, eats normally, acts normally. You can keep eye on her for few days for any changes in normal behavior and take her to vet if she suddenly changes, but by all accounts it seems she is not hurt. Well, maybe her pride and she might ...


20

Our cat was not thrilled to go into the box either (it was less severe than you, though). As soon as she felt that something was wrong she would run for her life under the bed and good luck getting her out of there. We did two things: we broke the routine of closing her somewhere and sneaking in with the box we put the box right in the middle of the living ...


18

This is natural behavior for cats. The kittens are now old enough to live on their own and the mother chases them away for several reasons: This is the territory of the mother. If she doesn't chase the kittens away, she has to search for a new territory. Female cats sometimes live together, but male cats are not social and if she doesn't chase her kittens ...


16

It is not necessarily a bad idea if you take the necessary precautions. A cat who used to wander freely outside knows the dangers and pitfalls of the outside. However, you need to take some precautions. Have your cat carry an easy break collar with your phone number on it. Have your cat microchipped. Have your cat vaccinated. Some people don't vaccinate ...


15

It's not really true - at the physiological level, I certainly cannot see how prolonged consumption of processed food could disable a cat from being able to digest natural food. However, I could see the trace element of truth in this statement's essence, which might explain it's plausible origin. Cats, compared to dogs, are known to be a bit of picky eaters. ...


14

No, that is categorically false. Now, it does take a cat some time (on the order of a week or two) to adjust to a new diet. But that's true of any new diet, whether you're moving from natural to processed, processed to natural, or between two different types of processed food. It's possible that whoever started that rumor just misunderstood the fact that ...


13

My theory is it’s because they’ve learned you’re a captive audience when you’re on the toilet, meaning there is nothing else distracting you from giving them attention like there probably is anywhere else in the house.


13

The previous answers are great, and I agree that there are many dangers for the safety of outdoor cats. Here is another reason I would not let my own cat roam freely outdoors: Domesticated cats are considered by many ecologists to be super-predators -- i.e., they kill many birds, many more than they eat, seemingly just for sport. Here's just one link to an ...


10

I don't see any reason why you shouldn't keep the gloves away from your cat. However, it may be the case that the cat will continue meowing without the gloves, or the cat will find something else to transfer this behavior to. I would guess the root cause is the cat is getting bored or lonely at night. You might also try minimizing this behavior by waiting ...


10

If you've ever watched a cat squeeze through an impossibly small hole (of course you have), you can understand that cats have extremely deformable bodies. This means their organs can move out of the way to some degree, and reduce the chance of damage. Really, I'd be surprised if a healthy cat that age would get much of an injury even by someone's full ...


10

If her poo is watery, that’s why: her body isn’t absorbing enough of the water in her food, leaving her too dehydrated to pee. This is a serious concern since peeing is how the body gets rid of non-food waste, and being dehydrated in general can cause kidney problems. You need to take her to a vet, which is a good practice anyway when you get a new pet. Are ...


9

As Fraxinus has said this, in practice doesn't make a whole lot of sense. A lot of cats are known for begging for almost any food, just like dogs, and as the owner of 3 cats that are fed procesed cat food I can personally attest that they will eat anything. 1 of them goes and hunts birds and mice all the time and the other 2 will eat chicken or bacon or ...


9

I would assume that your home is reasonably cat safe - because of course as a responsible cat owner you will already have made sure of that (e.g. removed poisonous plants). And of course you can always do a quick check before you leave and remove or secure typical traps like shopping bags with handles or boxes with lids that can be pushed open and fall ...


8

Letting your cat wander outside unsupervised is dangerous to his health. Never letting him outside will reduce his quality of life, perhaps drastically. Luckily, these aren't your only options. Your best bet is a third option: let your cat outside in a supervised or controlled fashion. You have several options to let your cat explore outside relatively ...


6

That sounds like made up panic. Now, I will freely admit this anecdotal, but having grown around cats, with several friends who also grew up with cats, this "ingesting cats hair is dangerous" doesn't really hold water. It is about as likely as ingesting your own hair, and about as dangerous. Now, matter is different if you have allergies, in which ...


6

I believe, in essence, it has to do with the cats both being curious and wanting to keep us companionship. With that being said, I think an additional and significant factor attracting cats to follow people to the bathroom could also be their common fascination with running water - cats are known to frequently have an obsession with sinks, faucets, drains ...


5

Cats are self-cleaning, so as long as she isn’t rolling around in something that could be poisonous (like fertilizer or weed killer), let her take care of that. Yes, the dirt will probably annoy her when she grooms later. If it annoys her enough, she will learn to be more careful about getting dirty. But if she doesn’t mind, then you shouldn’t either.


5

Your supposition is correct that in America, there is a fairly commonly held belief that people will obtain black cats around Halloween in order to do them harm. Some shelters may even restrict black cat adoptions for this reason. However, the statement that this is "common sense" advice is fallacious. I am American, and I never heard of such a ...


5

This is a very loaded question. Firstly, I hope you get well soon. The first thing you need to know about animals is that they don't hold grudges. If they are still around you and interact well with your parents, it means they are not scarred for life. Also, kittens are very fragile. Since they are alive and your parents can't notice any scars, you couldn't ...


5

Dry food expands on contact with liquids in the stomach, so if your cat can fill it’s entire stomach in one sitting, the expanding food has nowhere to go but back out the mouth. The usual solution is free-feeding, but that doesn’t work with a cat that already has weight problems. For many cats, this is what causes their weight problems. The only other ...


4

I've seen female cats do this exact thing with their kittens: grabbing them one by one, walking around with them held up tight in their mouth while meowing very loudly then eventually drop them in the destination, or lie down to feed them. So looks like something caused your cat to treat gloves as her kitten. You remember when it started? Maybe reaching to ...


4

A new home is scary to any cat, much less a kitten. Every strange sight, sound or smell could be a sign of something waiting to kill her. It takes time for her to explore her new environment and determine that it is safe. This is why cats in a new home will generally hide under/in something where they can’t be attacked, only coming out at night to eat and ...


4

I recently had to start feeding both of my two cats different food. I accomplished this by switching from leaving food out all day to feeding them twice a day. It was much easier than I expected. When I put the food out, I just make sure each cat starts with their own bowl; I find they stick to their bowl and don't try to switch. I don't have to stand over ...


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