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26

TLDR: Not really. While the risk is low - COVID-19 seems to be fairly indiscriminate, with documented cases of dogs, cats, zoo otters and farmed minks getting it. Most corona virus (There's a whole family of similar viruses like SARS and MERS) outbreaks are pretty certainly zoonotic (they come from animals in the first place), so extra caution is a good idea....


6

Advice from the UK government is similar to that of the CDC mentioned by Journeyman Geek (emphasis mine): If you, or a member of your household, have symptoms of coronavirus (COVID-19) you should self-isolate for 10 days. If you’re self-isolating you should make alternative arrangements to take care of your animal’s welfare. You should ask for support from ...


4

Look at things from the cat’s perspective: she was taken from everything she knows and dropped in a confined space with two strange animals ten-plus times her size. She is scared out of her mind, just as you would be in that situation, and hissing is one of the ways a cat tries to intimidate other animals to leave it alone without risking a fight. Also, keep ...


4

Cat food is formulated with all the vitamins and minerals a cat needs and with the assumption that the cat would only drink water in addition to eating the food. So if you want to make gravy yourself, you don't need to worry about adding any more nutrients. However, you must worry about not adding any harmful substances to the gravy. First and foremost those ...


4

It sounds to me like the root cause is boredom. Bengals have a reputation for being very high energy cats. Furthermore, at 9 months old, I would expect him to still have kitten levels of energy. So already I can tell he almost certainly requires a lot more play than the average cat. But also his pattern of behavior, sleep, chase, attack, follows the ...


4

There are two possible scenarios: Not everyone in your household is infected with COVID. In this case the cats could serve as vectors for the virus to spread to other members of your family so you should avoid contact with them and have other members of your family treat them as infected just in case. This means always wearing a mask around your cat or when ...


3

One of the most common vitamin overdoses in cats is Vitamin D. It can be caused by vitamin supplements or medications containing high amounts of vitamin D, but also by ingesting certain plants, rat poison, certain skin creams and even commercial cat food (see case study). It's also possible to overdose a cat with poorly balanced diets containing high ...


2

This might be a skin irritation or an infection, especially if only one paw is affected. Unfortunately, there's not much you can do at home, besides looking for possible causes. The cat would simply lick any topical lotion off. If possible, visit a vet to have them find the cause (maybe a bacterial or fungal infection) and offer the correct treatment. If a ...


2

Partial answer as per my recent update to the question. This is just taken from observation on how this specific case played out, and I'd assume is highly dependent on the personalities of the cats involved. We found a good home for the senior cat in question, where he was introduced to a 17 year old female, and a 6 year old male. First direct contact was ...


2

This answer is part of Pet's Spring Cleaning Campaign. This question is old, but this answer will still help people with the same problem. It is possible for an animal to stop liking things they were okay with in short time, especially if they aren't feeling well. Animals think in simple categories like good (pleasant, tasty, comfortable) and bad (painful, ...


2

In addition to StephenS's answer, you can improve your relationship with the cat via nonverbal communication. Every time you go into her safe room, you should do the "lazy cat blink" at her to tell her that you're friendly and don't want to fight. Never ever stare into her eyes or you destroy any chance at a peaceful life together. Looking at a ...


1

Imidacloprid and nicotine relationship Imidacloprid is a chemical substance from the family of neonicotinoids (synthetic analogs of nicotine). Nicotine itself is synthesized by some plants, like tobacco, as a natural defense mechanism against pests, and it had been used as agricultural pesticide for a long time; however, nowadays it is not as commonly used ...


1

Maybe. I think it's only for you to discern. How old is the eldest person the cat, or those around it, will come into contact within the next 14 days? If you, your wife, and everyone else is well under 65 years old, you are safe (statistically, nothing is 100%) to be with your cat. This doesn't preclude your cat carrying the disease and infecting others in ...


1

I used a small hand drill & some craft wire to hold it down. Doesn’t touch the water & kitty can’t rip it apart.


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