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51

Purring is a sign of wellbeing for the house cat. She certainly purrs because you are petting her, but if she would be sleeping on you then chances are she would probably also be purring without you touching her. Imagine this. When you pet her it's sort of like when you get a massage. You might fall asleep or you might drift off a little bit. Your cat is the ...


27

This answer is not correct. If you have a dominance problem with the dog (which MANY people do) letting the dog win will just exacerbate the aggression displayed by your dog. The act of playing is a release of energy and aggression, so I don't agree that you need to let the dog win in all circumstances. Personally I don't let my dog win at tug-of-war, and ...


15

As an FYI before reading, I've cited a source towards the end of this post for most of the information you'll find in it. Typically when two dogs are playing rough, it's better to let them figure things out. If your male dog seems to be biting down pretty hard on the female dog's scruff/neck area, and she doesn't seem to mind or still exhibits classic play ...


14

Tug as Play vs. Tug-Toy as Resource Unless you are dealing with a dog with resource-guarding or bite-inhibition issues, healthy play between dogs is reciprocal. When playing with humans, the play should also be reciprocal, but the human should maintain some control over when the game starts and stops. The ASPCA has a fairly thorough overview of tug, but ...


14

Not being a cat myself makes it hard to speculate about their motives, but my guess is: Cats seem to enjoy nesting an playing in snuggly-cuddly enclosed spaces. Not just cardboard boxes, but also baskets, laundry baskets, etc The insulation properties of the cardboard probably gives it a warm feel, which cats enjoy. Cardboard is easily scratchable and ...


14

Cats enjoy boxes because they love hiding places. When they are inside a box they are covered on all sides but one. Which means they are safe and can keep an eye out on the one open side. Boxes also allow for the cats to quickly dart from the box if something of interest appears, and allows for a quick retreat if necessary.


14

I've found that when my cats want that kind of play, I get the best results by substituting a decent-sized stuffed toy (catnip is optional). I don't mean one of the tiny mice designed for batting around, but, rather, a toy that's at least 3-4" around, something that the cat can reasonably hold onto with both front paws and/or its mouth while rolling around ...


14

It's just their play/hunt instinct kicking in. The piece of food might have dropped outside the bowl, cat uses a paw to get it free (to take it), then notices "omgosh! it's moving!" and starts to "hunt" the food. Nothing abnormal here and I wouldn't expect this to be just due to the cat being bored. Especially if the other cat sees the hunt, it will join in,...


12

1. Kittens are generally playful We recently got three cats. When they joined our family, they were 8 months, 8 months and 5 months old. All of them were still childishly playful, and have been for months after. For a 16wk old kitten, I'm expecting it to remain this playful for at least a couple of months. Since you've already bought toys and such for him, I ...


11

Teaching a retrieve is a great example of when you can use backchaining to get your desired effect. Essentially, when backchaining a sequence (in this case, go get something and bring it back), you start with the last thing in the sequence and add a ton of value into that, then slowly add in the steps backwards. Because you've built so much value into the ...


11

Uncommon, but not rare. Chase-and-pounce is, of course, a widespread cat game; "retrieving" is the more complicated behavior. Some cats figure out on their own that humans can be trained to throw a toy repeatedly if it's brought to them. One of mine does this. (Though it only works around a corner, since if she can see me she seems to get distracted and ...


11

There's no good reason to assume that purring is tiring for cats. Whilst the exact mechanism by which cats purr is not fully understood, it seems to be an almost passive part of breathing to them. Specifically, it seems that they have specific nerve circuitry which, when activated, causes the vocal cords to flap quickly, producing the purr we hear. As far as ...


11

I knew a cat who literally purred the entire time he was awake. His vet liked to say that he "didn't know how to turn his engine off". It didn't appear to tire him at all, he had just as much energy as other cats. He never had any trouble falling asleep either (the purring would just fade out over the course of a couple of minutes). I wouldn't ...


10

James Jenkins' answer is very near what I would have suggested, but I see from your comment that you've tried alternative toys with little success. Before I go on, I want to repeat what James said about the existing headphones: get rid of them. All of them. Keeping your cat entertained isn't worth the risk of an intestinal blockage. Since new toys haven'...


10

Cats (and all animals in general) do not understand the concepts of order or tidiness. The idea that things have a correct place to go is a human idea (and a learned idea at that). Unless you specifically train your cat to put a specific toy in a specific place, you will always need to pick up after your cat. And your cat will probably never understand the ...


9

It might be that she's just not interested. She's obviously smart, and does interact with people, but toys simply may not catch her attention. She might just find it boring. Alternatively she may just be picky - our resident canine won't bother with anything non-squeeky. You might also experiment with varied play - we tend to 'refuse' to give ours a toy, ...


9

Although I'm 100% in favour of clicker training, in this case it might not be the best approach to start with. What you want to do is to make the dog enjoy and initiate playing fetch. To me this is closer to classical conditioning than to operant conditioning. Clicker training, and positive reinforcement training is about operant conditioning, you ...


9

Cats should be indoors only, or supervised outdoors You are right to be concerned about letting your cat outside unsupervised. Keeping your cats indoors protects against MANY problems that can make your cat sick or die! According to the American Humane Society, cats who are either part-time or full-time allowed to roam outdoors alone face the following ...


9

Playtime is an important bonding experience between you and your cat so you should take the opportunity to play! However, if you let her play with your hand, you will teach her that hands are acceptable playtoys, and it will become difficult to later teach her not to bite or claw at your hands. I would also recommend staying away from any toys that are ...


8

In games, your cat is learning skills that he will use throughout his life. When he accidentally corners himself, it's scary, and he reacts out of fear (by hissing). As his guardian/playmate, if you respect his hiss and back off until he can uncorner himself and show interest in playing again, then he will learn that his verbal warning is effective. In the ...


8

I'm not fond of kittens and tend to get rescue kitties who are adults, so my advice is going to be based on my experience of mature, adult cats. I'm not sure if their young age would affect anything here, but I just wanted to point that out ahead of time. Your cats may have different play drives. The older cat wants to end the play session (thus, the ...


8

We had a Labrador Retriever that would run down and catch a Frisbee all day long. When you threw it, she would run it down, catch it, and bring it back and kept doing it as long as you kept throwing it. Because of this, it became necessary to have to cut her off more than once when she started to show signs of wearing down. It's been a few years since ...


8

I think she needs some more stimulation. Keep in mind that she is still a young cat with a lot of energy. I'd say a good place to start is to make the playsessions longer and atleast one or two of them very high speed. Try to make her pant. I have a 2 years old bengal cat and she can easily run at top speed and do crazy jumps for 15 minutes without being ...


8

Cats aren't toys! They are living creatures - and like (most) living creatures they need a sufficient amount of sleep in order to maintain their health, and cats in particular sleep quite a lot (16-20 hours a day depending on their age) and are naturally awake on a different rhythm than humans are (they are crepuscular so are most alert at dawn and dusk). ...


7

As a general rule, not giving your pet objects to play with that may be harmful to them is a good practice. So "the fix" is to clean up all the earplugs that are in the house, and stop bringing in more. Throw them out at the job site, or leave them in your vehicle in the future. Given your current conditions, doing the clean up on Friday night would be ...


7

They don't intend to leave those items around the house or untidy the house. They just lose interest. And socks, sweatbands and any sponge material; they just love this material as these things make one of their favorite activity "Clawing" fun. One can specifically bring soft toys and even things made of soft wood for them to claw around but they will ...


7

This video, Here's Why Cats Love Boxes So Much, contains explanation by Stephen Zawistowski (Science Advisor, ASPCA) on why cats love being in boxes . The video is quite short, with some cute cat footages, and the main points are: they feel security and can be approached without being aware of it they can watch what's around them while feeling safe and ...


7

Cat on cat play cannot be forced. Some cats live together their entire lives but never play with each other. That your cats do play together is great! One way to encourage their relationship is to play with them together. String toys on a stick, like the Bird or similar toys are easy to use with one or more cats and lets you direct the toy very precisely so ...


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