20

First, with any behavior change, you should take your cat to the vet to make sure there's no underlying health problem. After the vet has determined that the change is behavioral and not related to a physical problem, you can start to look at your cat's environment from his perspective to try to track down the change. Understand that cats are comforted by ...


15

There are several types of arthritis that can affect your dog. Some of these are very treatable, others less so. In either event, I think it is a good idea to get her looked at by a vet. In terms of general activities/considerations as a lot of the arthritis management truisms for us apply to them1: Make sure that her weight is ideal. Heavier dogs are ...


13

90% of cats have arthritis by age 12. Signs of arthritis are: Trouble getting in or to the litterbox. Greasy, unkempt fur - unable to groom themselves. Missing jumps, hesistant to jump. No longer using scratching posts (nails become overgrown) No longer wanting to play Difficulty climbing stairs How to help Veterinary consultation for anti-inflammatories -...


13

There are several problems here that need to be addressed. Can your cat drink water without problems? If yes, then your assumption that your cat cannot keep food in its mouth is wrong. The correct assumption is that your cat cannot chew food. The solution to this problem is to provide food that has the consistency of paste and can be licked up. If your cat ...


12

Since this is a change in his behaviour, and he has lost weight, I would take him to the vet for a check-up. You will want to rule out any health issues first. If the vet does not have any answer for you, then I would have to say that something is causing him to feel insecure. Either he is guarding the litter box, or something has happened where he doesn't ...


9

When is a human considered to be old? The answer really depends on the individual. The seven year rule is old and inaccurate. There are several other methods that take the life expectancy of dogs into account better, eg one dog-year equals five humans-years for small dogs and seven for bigger dogs. And then there are even some nonlinear metrics in ...


9

Try carrying a water pistol/spray bottle with you when you walk your dog and anytime the cat comes near give it a spray. Most cats aren't very keen on getting wet and will cotton on to this pretty quickly and start avoiding you and the dog, and as much as cats might hate getting wet it doesn't actually harm them so it's preferable to kicking them!


9

NEVER GIVE YOUR CAT MILK. Cats and all other adult mammals are unable to digest lactose, it makes them and many of us ill. The negative effect of giving milk is most likely stronger than the positive effect of glucosamine and the mineral supplement. As Elmy say in her answer, if the vomit is dark it might be internal bleeding so you will need to take your ...


8

The reason you confine cats to a small room initially is to not overwhelm them with new (new objects, new scents, new movement, etc). A smaller room has less new and so is less overwhelming. Ultimately, the choice of where to confine a new cat will depend on number of new cats if there are multiple cats, how well bonded they are any potential health ...


8

It isn't teasing at all - it's actually very sweet of you. She can't see the world around her, so she has to rely on other senses. You're just giving her the opportunity to understand her surroundings in the best way she can. If anything, it would be mean to withhold this kind of information from her. Basically, she's being curious, and you are making ...


8

First of all, I would pack some of the vomit up and send it to a vet for analysis. Speak to your vet to arrange a swift and efficient handover. To do this, clean an empty, airtight food container like a small glass jar or Tupperware container. If the container doesn't melt at boiling temperature, rinse it with boiling water to sterilize it (don't forget the ...


7

With rabbits when they can't get into the litter box we generally cut out one side (round the edges) so they can get in and out without trying to climb over the edge. We have had good results even with paraplegic (broken back) rabbits. BUT, I don't think that option will work with your cat. It sounds like she has a 'need' to not get her feet in the litter....


7

8 years, would be a good average to concider your dog as "old" or "senior" but there are no real fixed age. Just the difference between the races' lifespan makes it easy to understand. Small dogs tend to live between 15 to 20 years as big dogs will live between 12 to 15. The reasons why I say 8 years old is the threshold is because that at about this age ...


7

Food sensitivity is worth ruling out; I found out the expensive way with my cat (also a picky eater who lived on tuna food and was fed white fish daily as a youngster). After 11 years eating Felix tuna "chunks in jelly" (and Hill's t/d bites), having rejected other brands and other Felix types and flavours, he started, well, blowing chunks - once a ...


6

It varies, but cats and small dogs are generally considered to be old at the age of 7. Larger breed dogs tend to have shorter life spans and are considered to be old when they are approximately 6 years of age. Owners tend to want to think of their pet's age in human terms.


6

Loud meowing is very common in deaf cats. If she seems content, I assume the wailing is caused by her deafness. Unfortunately, I'm not aware of any way to stop this behaviour, since the cat is probably unaware of it. Adding a bit of soundproofing to the room she sleeps in may be the only option.


6

It may be that your cat is getting confused by the shag carpet, thinking it's like the grass outside or something like that. One of my cats had an accident just once inside a toy box, and it was pretty obvious that the cat confused the toy box for a litterbox, as it was box shaped and had things in it the cat could bury with. With the toy box situation, ...


6

Firstly you should get a black light and check all around your house. You may think he only peed on the carpet, but that could very well be false. You recently moved, cats don't usually deal well with change. You also have a small child. Pretty sure the cat is stressed. Even if it isn't, it could be marking since the house is new, maybe even bigger than ...


5

As John Cavan notes, it's common for elderly cats but we don't currently know what the cause of hyperthyroidism is. I'll outline some of the current research directions here. The research is not yet conclusive for anything (and at times, conflicting!), but these are the paths that medical science is investigating. Food Causes This study is a broad survey (...


5

Blackwell's medical consult for felines and canines notes a couple of points: It is the most common endocrine disease in cats. One of the most common diseases, period, in late-middle age and elderly cats. True numbers unknown, but increasingly diagnosed. Rarely caused by cancer, though it happens They document some risk factors so, presumably, reducing ...


5

Build a ramp. After looking at your picture, I think it would be best to build it facing the side (right side of the picture) rather than lying over the steps. It could probably be a very simple design of a long board with legs on one side. Maybe you can even find a reasonably priced portable wheelchair ramp. As shown in this picture, the ramp doesn't have ...


4

This sounds similar to my cat, and there was an underlying health condition causing them to act like this; I hope yours isn't the same, but mine had kidney failure and sadly we had to have her put to sleep. She still ate loads, however she started to drink a lot more water, which would make sense considering the issues she was having. A little stress is ...


4

If your dog is used to hanging out in higher places (such as on the couch/chairs/elevated bed), but the arthritis is preventing him from being able to safely jump to/from such places, there are special "dog stairs" and "dog ramps" that you can purchase and set up to allow him access to those type of spots without jumping. We used this when our puppy could ...


4

I used desensitization to introduce a 9 month old to my 5 year old. Cats rely heavily on their sense of smell and so this takes the form of progressive introduction through "site swapping" allowing them both to get used to the other's smell while not letting them directly interact. After the new cat got used to being in the smaller room, I would open and ...


4

One interesting thing I noticed in my cat rescue days is how well two strange cats will get along is based on how much of a threat the new cat is perceived as. This follows a fairly intuitive model that often applies to introducing humans as well: Older cats are threatened by new younger cats. Cats are more threatened by same sex cats. Kittens, sickly, ...


4

This is the solution we used, we had previously trained the older rabbit to go into a carrier at meal time, while the younger rabbit eats in another location (separate diets required for everything other than hay and lettuce). After identifying a pill that could be split safely we purchased some fresh pineapple. Cut the pineapple into bit size bits, put an ...


4

You can easily use the same rules as with a kitten, although a bathroom might be fairly small for an adult cat for too long. I use a spare room that doesn't have a bed. While being under things is comforting, I would rather be able to get access to a nervous cat. There is a closet where the cat can 'hide' but I can pet him. I put food and water in one ...


4

My elderly puppy (approaching 8 yrs old) sounds very similar to your dog. I've tried a number of things to work on her reactivity to other dogs and to get her comfortable in public in general, most have worked pretty well. For reactivity to other dogs, the trainer I'm working with has me playing a game with my dog. When another dog appears on the scene and ...


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