12

Your dog is pulling on the leash because he is in a hurry to get somewhere. The easiest way to stop a dog from pulling on the leash is to just stop. When he stops pulling, then you can start walking again. Be patient and consistent. Eventually, your dog will get it: pulling on the leash stops them from getting what they want. Keep in mind that chasing ...


11

It looks like a "pure" training problem. I'll divide the answer in two parts: the choice of a training method and then implementation of the training. How to train the cat: physiological and behavioural modifications? The reaction of the cat is not that surprising. There are many training strategies available the ones I would use in this case are: ...


10

There are many signs placed out to warn the public. The answers to How do I stop my dog from eating things he finds during our walks? are quite relevant to this situation. According to the articles: 1) Locations include, but are not limited to: the Twin Peaks neighborhood on Crestline Drive the Outer Richmond District around the intersection of La Playa ...


10

Its always safe to wait till full vaccination. Taking him to streets or parks is risky without full vaccination. If you still want to socialize him before full vaccination, then you can make his interaction with known dogs that you know from the neighborhood etc which have had their full vaccination; either at your or their place. Avoid public places.


10

It sounds like you are on the right path. All the positive reinforcement will help him learn to learn and trust you as well. Don't give up... you will get there. If it feels like you have hit a wall it's probably one of two things. ..or a combination. Either he has figured out the "game" or you went to fast at some point. Either way it will help if you ...


9

He is doing this because dogs are curious and like eating things that are not dog food. You can train your dog to avoid that but he'd still have to be very close to you even off-leash for supervision. Some dogs are extremely tempted by food and it's a hard behavior to break especially if your dog isn't trained. In a controlled environment put small treats ...


9

First let me add a few word of caution here: Do not use a head halter / halt / holt alone. It can cause serious damage to their neck. Use it in combination with a leash attached to a flat collar or harness. The dog pulls on the leash attached to the collar, and you control the head with another leash. You can also use a cani cross harness for the pulling ...


9

Time and patience. Cats are not dogs; they don't adjust quickly to harnesses or leashes, and every cat I've known will "shut down" the first time (usually the first several times) they're put into a harness. The solution is to give them time to acclimate to the feeling of the harness on their body, and to get used to the idea that yes, they can still move ...


8

The dog learns soon how long an average walk is with you, and administers his dosage of pee so that he can keep on marking his territory as far as the walk continues. When there's more people involved in walking the dog daily then it will also learn to individual habits of each person regarding the length of a walk. Some clever animals, dogs. It is quite ...


8

Bunnies leash train very easily. The two primary concerns are choice of a harness and a leash. For the harness choose one that is soft, and can be attached snugly. I personally prefer the Comfort Harness by Super Pet. It is soft, pliable and mesh so it breathes well. It comes with Velcro straps and buckles. Personally, I cut the buckles off and just ...


8

To get a rabbit to use a leash, the first thing to do is select the right leash for this type of pet. Depending on the type of rabbit, the animal may be more fragile than a typical cat or a dog. Rabbits, being prey animals, are also more likely to panic and try to run away. Therefore, to protect the rabbit from injuring itself, a harness would be best. When ...


8

So your dog has learnt that the command "come here" or "here" means run away? Remember your dog does not speak your language by mouth! I believe in positive reinforcement. Think about when you use the command, and how you caress the dogs response! It is very easy to misuse a command and thereby learn your dog a unwanted behavior. You will have to find ...


8

A harness just puts the pressure of the leash around the strongest part of your dog's body. So, while the harness would technically be more comfortable for the dog, it will be less comfortable for you. A harness will help your dog control you better, rather than the control you're looking for. The long-term solution is to train your dog not to pull on the ...


7

I used to walk our Husky/Malamute cross when I was younger and that was a breed that could yank the arms out of your socket at the slightest hint of a reason to run and a collar was not an issue for him. The thing is, a dog isn't so stupid that it would hurt himself in the process of trying to pull forward, it will back off the pressure if there is a ...


7

how is it going? Your description makes me think of a dog that might have been a nice, even beloved homebody dog who developed into an unmanageable training drop-out so that his owners despaired of being able to keep him - and hoped to give him a chance with somebody else. Supposedly he knows some training 'helpers', starting with stopping when he pulls ...


7

This is quite a common issue that tends to happen with dogs, especially as they reach the one year old mark. Huskies in particular tend to pull, that's why they make great sled dogs! I would start by ensuring you are using adequate equipment. I recommend a regular flat collar (I like leather ones, they aren't as likely to break, something like this) and a ...


6

The most important aspect about controlling your dog on the leash is for your dog to understand that you are the one who leads and not the other way around. When your dog pulls you in a direction that you do not wish to go, or even in a direction that you wish to go but not at that pace then you are submitting to the dog's will and degrading your image of ...


6

My dog acts the same. What usually works for me is: If the dog sees you (but for example, runs away from you) - turn around and start walking home. Try to walk pretty fast or even run. I try to stomp my feet and make some noise while doing this so my dog will notice. Your dog thinks you're playing catch, so if you run away it means she needs to catch you! ...


6

My lead's P-Clip got all stiff and as my wife is beginning to suffer from arthritis we searched and searched for pain free solution to this age old problem. The answer for us was a fairly new product called a Magloc. It has a magnet that connect the lead to the collar and then some clever little jaws hold it in place. The best bit is the release, just ...


6

It's sounding to me like the main issue is the clicking of the buckle. So perhaps for the time being, if you can use some paracord to fasten a harness that he can wear, just to get used to having something around his neck/shoulders. Then in the meantime, you could try to get him used to the sound of the buckle clicking together. Keep playing the games you'...


6

Pre-walk ritual It is already good that you have him sit before going out. Sitting is a deferential behaviour helping him to gather information about what's going on. In addition sitting helps the dog relax. Before going out for a walk you don't want to train for an "excited" or "obedience like" sit (I mean that the goal is not the "sit" in itself, like a ...


6

Two things I could immediately think of, although they cost a bit, but maybe the owners would be interested in it as well – both would also work in conjunction with each other: Get a harness in addition to a collar. This gives you two points of support to hold the dog back, while also giving you more control over where he's looking/turning (so you might ...


6

Since you only have a week before the move, I would wait until after your cat has been completely settled into your new place before you begin leash training. Cats aren't very good with stress, and, besides being obviously uncomfortable for them, can develop undesired behavior from too much stress like spraying, vomiting, excessive shedding, and so forth. ...


5

Prevention is the key. If you're afraid to be late, or are in a bad mood, just keep him on leash. If the dog is unleashed, or if he's not, try to improve his visibility. You can find some useful information in this question: When walking my dog at night, how can I improve his visibility to others? So prevention, and then training. There are many good ...


5

I can understand your fear, but dogs should not be chained at all. Where I live it's even illegal to keep a dog on a chain because it's considered animal cruelty. Dogs cannot understand that you want to protect them by keeping them on a chain. They also cannot understand why they cannot move to a certain place if there's no wall or obstacle in front of them. ...


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