12

Your dog is pulling on the leash because he is in a hurry to get somewhere. The easiest way to stop a dog from pulling on the leash is to just stop. When he stops pulling, then you can start walking again. Be patient and consistent. Eventually, your dog will get it: pulling on the leash stops them from getting what they want. Keep in mind that chasing ...


11

It looks like a "pure" training problem. I'll divide the answer in two parts: the choice of a training method and then implementation of the training. How to train the cat: physiological and behavioural modifications? The reaction of the cat is not that surprising. There are many training strategies available the ones I would use in this case are: ...


10

There are many signs placed out to warn the public. The answers to How do I stop my dog from eating things he finds during our walks? are quite relevant to this situation. According to the articles: 1) Locations include, but are not limited to: the Twin Peaks neighborhood on Crestline Drive the Outer Richmond District around the intersection of La Playa ...


10

It sounds like you are on the right path. All the positive reinforcement will help him learn to learn and trust you as well. Don't give up... you will get there. If it feels like you have hit a wall it's probably one of two things. ..or a combination. Either he has figured out the "game" or you went to fast at some point. Either way it will help if you ...


9

First let me add a few word of caution here: Do not use a head halter / halt / holt alone. It can cause serious damage to their neck. Use it in combination with a leash attached to a flat collar or harness. The dog pulls on the leash attached to the collar, and you control the head with another leash. You can also use a cani cross harness for the pulling ...


9

Time and patience. Cats are not dogs; they don't adjust quickly to harnesses or leashes, and every cat I've known will "shut down" the first time (usually the first several times) they're put into a harness. The solution is to give them time to acclimate to the feeling of the harness on their body, and to get used to the idea that yes, they can still move ...


8

The dog learns soon how long an average walk is with you, and administers his dosage of pee so that he can keep on marking his territory as far as the walk continues. When there's more people involved in walking the dog daily then it will also learn to individual habits of each person regarding the length of a walk. Some clever animals, dogs. It is quite ...


8

So your dog has learnt that the command "come here" or "here" means run away? Remember your dog does not speak your language by mouth! I believe in positive reinforcement. Think about when you use the command, and how you caress the dogs response! It is very easy to misuse a command and thereby learn your dog a unwanted behavior. You will have to find ...


7

how is it going? Your description makes me think of a dog that might have been a nice, even beloved homebody dog who developed into an unmanageable training drop-out so that his owners despaired of being able to keep him - and hoped to give him a chance with somebody else. Supposedly he knows some training 'helpers', starting with stopping when he pulls ...


7

This is quite a common issue that tends to happen with dogs, especially as they reach the one year old mark. Huskies in particular tend to pull, that's why they make great sled dogs! I would start by ensuring you are using adequate equipment. I recommend a regular flat collar (I like leather ones, they aren't as likely to break, something like this) and a ...


6

My lead's P-Clip got all stiff and as my wife is beginning to suffer from arthritis we searched and searched for pain free solution to this age old problem. The answer for us was a fairly new product called a Magloc. It has a magnet that connect the lead to the collar and then some clever little jaws hold it in place. The best bit is the release, just ...


6

It's sounding to me like the main issue is the clicking of the buckle. So perhaps for the time being, if you can use some paracord to fasten a harness that he can wear, just to get used to having something around his neck/shoulders. Then in the meantime, you could try to get him used to the sound of the buckle clicking together. Keep playing the games you'...


6

The most important aspect about controlling your dog on the leash is for your dog to understand that you are the one who leads and not the other way around. When your dog pulls you in a direction that you do not wish to go, or even in a direction that you wish to go but not at that pace then you are submitting to the dog's will and degrading your image of ...


6

My dog acts the same. What usually works for me is: If the dog sees you (but for example, runs away from you) - turn around and start walking home. Try to walk pretty fast or even run. I try to stomp my feet and make some noise while doing this so my dog will notice. Your dog thinks you're playing catch, so if you run away it means she needs to catch you! ...


6

Pre-walk ritual It is already good that you have him sit before going out. Sitting is a deferential behaviour helping him to gather information about what's going on. In addition sitting helps the dog relax. Before going out for a walk you don't want to train for an "excited" or "obedience like" sit (I mean that the goal is not the "sit" in itself, like a ...


6

Two things I could immediately think of, although they cost a bit, but maybe the owners would be interested in it as well – both would also work in conjunction with each other: Get a harness in addition to a collar. This gives you two points of support to hold the dog back, while also giving you more control over where he's looking/turning (so you might ...


6

Since you only have a week before the move, I would wait until after your cat has been completely settled into your new place before you begin leash training. Cats aren't very good with stress, and, besides being obviously uncomfortable for them, can develop undesired behavior from too much stress like spraying, vomiting, excessive shedding, and so forth. ...


5

Prevention is the key. If you're afraid to be late, or are in a bad mood, just keep him on leash. If the dog is unleashed, or if he's not, try to improve his visibility. You can find some useful information in this question: When walking my dog at night, how can I improve his visibility to others? So prevention, and then training. There are many good ...


5

I know this is probably too late as you've probably fixed it or given up by now, but I just wanted to add my 2 cents. I've trained horses and it's given me a different perspective. I see a lot of people who, for lack of a better term, force something onto a dog, because they can do it and out fight the dog. You can't out fight a horse, so it takes different ...


5

I can understand your fear, but dogs should not be chained at all. Where I live it's even illegal to keep a dog on a chain because it's considered animal cruelty. Dogs cannot understand that you want to protect them by keeping them on a chain. They also cannot understand why they cannot move to a certain place if there's no wall or obstacle in front of them. ...


4

'Super pet' makes a harness that has buckles and Velcro. I am not sure it comes in a size big enough for your dog. But when I use it on rabbits I cut the buckles off and just use the Velcro. You may also be able to find dog "outfits" that Velcro on to work on harness training. Alternatively you can get some Velcro and make a training collar. Maybe make ...


4

My elderly puppy (approaching 8 yrs old) sounds very similar to your dog. I've tried a number of things to work on her reactivity to other dogs and to get her comfortable in public in general, most have worked pretty well. For reactivity to other dogs, the trainer I'm working with has me playing a game with my dog. When another dog appears on the scene and ...


4

This is not a copy paste but i have also tried it, Whenever your dog pulls, stop and stand still (be a tree). No matter how hard your dog pulls, don't let it go in the direction it wants to go. The reason for this is that if the dog pulls, and you follow it, the dog is learning that pulling is a very effective way to get somewhere. Wait until ...


4

I walk difficult dogs (untrained and usually why they are there!) at the local shelter and I use an easy walk harness. They become completely different dogs using this harness. Sometimes I think the old leash and collar around the neck method of walking is not the best way or safest way of walking our dogs since it can cause injury to the trachea and dogs ...


4

Yes, you can use a leash on a cat; I do it all the time. It's best to start them out at a younger age, but even if they are adult cats, they can still be trained by using a harness and a leash. Try starting out slow, like walking them around the yard with a harness and leash. For awhile, they may just roll over or lay down; just pick them back up and place ...


4

I have some limited experience with a street dog that went through a rescue program and was adopted. Sometimes dogs shy away from human attention, especially if they had negative experiences with humans hurting them. The dog I know will sneak in circles around me and try to sniff me from behind, but run away as soon as I just look at her. So my solution is ...


3

replace the clip with a carabiner, it's not quick release but much easier to handle than fighting a rusted spring with a little tab


3

Okay, so you've got a dog running around without a leash and one that won't let you catch him? I'd suggest taking what some of the other users have said very seriously, but one more thing that you may want to do is something that I train all my dogs to do: love car rides. Every dog I've ever owned in my life has been trained to get into a car without a ...


3

There are two ways to go about it. To fix the immediate problem, don't stop walking. I'm not sure of your set-up, but I recommend a collar that can't slip off or pop open, possibly one that tightens when tension is applied to prevent this. You should also have an approximately 6' lead that is at least a couple of inches wide. The reason I recommend these is ...


3

One of the earliest exercises we learned with our dog was autofocus. Specifically - to get them in the general habit of 'paying attention'. It's quite simple really - using a sufficiently high value treat, hold it under your chin. When the dog looks at your face, reward them. Do it fairly frequently, and slowly build up the amount of time. What you need to ...


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