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31

This is a common behaviour. There are a few different ideas as to why cats seem to like shoes in particular as stash locations. They are small spaces that seem hidden, which cats like - they want to hunt things and then hide them for later, and the shoes seem like a good sneaky way to hide them away from the other people in the house (or other animals), as ...


26

I saw a documentary that says cats will bring 'prey' (this included dead plant particulate as well as animals in the show) to their owners, because they believed they were bringing sustenance to the pack when they might not be able to obtain it themselves. So your cat probably thinks you're a bad hunter and she's trying to keep you alive. The things she has ...


25

This article from Princeton University deals with laser pointer use and human effect, and it mentions that use of laser pointers that are higher than 5 mW are dangerous and should not be used, so it seems like the green one might be safe, although they recommend that the lower the output the better, as they will be safer. Like with any laser, avoid pointing ...


15

Aww - it's a love offering! Much like the other person answered that it's an offering of food, it has a deeper meaning. It's out of favored affection, not so much concern you are going to starve. I learned of this years ago from some pet doctor. And please note that only few people get these special offerings, so you should feel very special and I think ...


14

There are a lot of toys on the market designed to stimulate cats who are stuck in indoor environments, and usually they are designed to mimic behaviours that cats use outside and in the wild, etc. Some suggestions you might want to try that don't involve buying possibly expensive toys that your cat might not like are: give it food to hunt. I often use cat ...


11

Ashley Nunn made some great suggestions, and I won't repeat her advice. I will add, though, a couple of suggestions: Ensure she has a comfortable perch with a view. Some cats can be quite content to watch what's going on outside. There are a variety of cat perches that you can mount on a window sill, or, if you have a cat tree, such as Ashley Nunn ...


10

I see two possible explanations, and the reality may have a bit of both or more: He might just want you to play with him. The meowing you describe might be the kind of call an adult cat uses when announcing prey he/she caught; usually reserved for her kittens. While I have not personally witnessed toms behave this way, I have observed the behavior in cats ...


10

Cats (and all animals in general) do not understand the concepts of order or tidiness. The idea that things have a correct place to go is a human idea (and a learned idea at that). Unless you specifically train your cat to put a specific toy in a specific place, you will always need to pick up after your cat. And your cat will probably never understand the ...


10

Uncommon, but not rare. Chase-and-pounce is, of course, a widespread cat game; "retrieving" is the more complicated behavior. Some cats figure out on their own that humans can be trained to throw a toy repeatedly if it's brought to them. One of mine does this. (Though it only works around a corner, since if she can see me she seems to get distracted and ...


9

I had a dog with Cushing's Disease, and he gobbled food. To prevent this, I put a portion of his daily food in a Kong. He primarily ate dry kibble. To get the dry kibble into the Kong, I wet the kibble with water and mushed it into a paste after it soaked for 5 minutes. Sometimes I added additional dry kibble (for crunchiness!) and a small amount of ...


9

As low as you can get away with. The issue isn't so much with the output, as it is with keeping the laser beam away from the cat's eyes and minimizing the damage in the event that you accidentally shine the laser in the cat's eyes. Same reason behind why it's illegal to shine a laser at a passing airplane, it has the possibility of blinding the pilot.


9

It might be that she's just not interested. She's obviously smart, and does interact with people, but toys simply may not catch her attention. She might just find it boring. Alternatively she may just be picky - our resident canine won't bother with anything non-squeeky. You might also experiment with varied play - we tend to 'refuse' to give ours a toy, ...


9

It can also be "here, watch this for me" or "I like you so I'm sharing my toy with you" or "this place is mine so I'm comfortable parking my toy here" -- or even just "I was playing with the toy, but lost interest in it when I saw you; I'd rather play with you." I think I've seen all of these.


8

I believe that there isn't an association between strings on toys and shoelaces. Two of our cats (Hunter and Juliet) would rather play with the strings on wand toys than whatever the strings are attached to (feathers or whatever), but they haven't really carried that connection to other similar objects. We first knew that we had a problem with strings when ...


8

I'd agree with Tijesunimi... your cat is -REALLY- getting into the spirit of the hunt. A true growl is always aggressive. In this case your cat is saying "THIS IS MINE, EVERYONE BACK OFF FROM IT!" That doesn't necessarily mean that the cat actually thinks you or someone / something else is trying to take it away (it can, but it doesn't have to). In this ...


8

Cats tend to sleep more during the day, so they aren't likely to pine for you. Just be sure to give them lots of attention when you get home. In my experience, cats tend to adjust to the amount of attention they get (assuming they were properly socialised as kittens). When you give them a lot of attention, they want a lot of attention. Ignore them for too ...


8

I wasn't able to find any solid research (at all, on playing with cats and laser pointers). What I can find is animal behaviorists who say that laser pointers (without transition to a solid toy/treat) are psychologically harmful. Examples Pam Johnson-Bennett (Certified Cat Behavior Consultant, on TV show Psycho Kitty) gives additional reasons why laser ...


8

Pretty much any cat toy is enriching in that it engages the cat’s mind and gives them exercise. I included the low-cost and home-made/repurposed items i have discovered over the years and also some higher-end ones as well. I spilt the list of cat toys into two categories: human interaction not required and human interaction required. Note that you can ...


7

I've had similar issues getting my dog interested in toys. One dog will lay in bed all day and only play on his own "in secret" at night. He is 13-years-old, and historically only interacts well with my wife (his "person"), so I'm not concerned with him. The more universally-interactive dog will not play with toys, but she will sun ...


7

They don't intend to leave those items around the house or untidy the house. They just lose interest. And socks, sweatbands and any sponge material; they just love this material as these things make one of their favorite activity "Clawing" fun. One can specifically bring soft toys and even things made of soft wood for them to claw around but they will ...


7

For unattended feeding, I'd recommend considering a timed feeder rather than a Kong if you're going to use kibble or pellets. There's no good way of keeping it in there, and he's just going to get it out and scarfed down quickly. With wet food, it's frozen, so you don't run into additional problems. You could use sticky edible stuff to kind of glue it ...


7

My dog is a Shiba Inu, and I would classify him as a destroyer of toys. Here are my general guide lines: What's on the inside is going to be on the outside in a very short time (applies to plush/stuffed animals) If I can cut it with scissors, he's going to shred it with his teeth It's not a good sign if the packaging specifically warns against letting the ...


7

Use the red. All lasers can be dangerous if they hit the eye of a cat or a human, but red lasers are usually much less powerful and still very visible to cats. I'm a little torn on this topic because I've used red lasers as a cat toy lots of times, but it really isn't intended as a cat toy and it's worth remembering that their eyes are far more sensitive ...


7

In my experience cats are pretty self-sufficient. As long as they have food, water, and a litterbox they can be fine on their own for a work day - although a selection of toys helps. Kittens are more demanding - if you're looking at getting a kitten, I'd recommend getting two. Littermates will already know each other, but kittens rarely have issues ...


7

Dogs don't distinguish luminance (brightness) as well as we do, and have trouble telling red from green. The image below is the best comparison I've found of how we see vs. how they see, against different backgrounds. Websearching "dog color vision" found it, and a great deal of additional data.


7

One of our cats does this with one particular toy about twice a day, once for me and once for my wife. It's usually after he's had a meal or some treats, so we believe it's a gesture of thanks to us for providing. Years ago, we had another cat who used to carry around toys while meowing, but they weren't "deliveries" for us. She just carried them around. ...


7

I think the reason he's doing this is that he's new to your home, and the litter box is the one place that he's sure is his. So naturally he wants to keep his toy there. The problem should go away as he settles in. Make sure he has lots of cozy places of his own, where he feels safe. Cat beds, cardboard boxes, cat trees, etc.


6

I wouldn't worry about a lack of interest in retrieving, since most dogs have to be taught how to do this. My dog (Shiba Inu) treats a game of fetch as a way to start a game of keep-away. Toy Recommendations My boy bores easily, so most of his toys (flatties, ropes, and Kong rope stuffed animals) are used for either chewing or playing keep-away. There ...


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