12

Your dog is pulling on the leash because he is in a hurry to get somewhere. The easiest way to stop a dog from pulling on the leash is to just stop. When he stops pulling, then you can start walking again. Be patient and consistent. Eventually, your dog will get it: pulling on the leash stops them from getting what they want. Keep in mind that chasing ...


11

There's nothing inherently wrong with hot dogs. In fact, they're a popular treat used in training. But, they are treats, and as such should be given in moderation. The meat shouldn't make a difference really (though pork should be cooked to avoid parasites, the same as you would if you were planning on eating it). What matters is what has been added to the ...


8

We have a Chihuahua cross breed that is probably around the same size as a Dachshund that manages to climb up into a cubby house via the ramp. I've just measured the angle as 30 degrees and I get the impression from seeing him that if much steeper he'd find it difficult. That ramp is constructed from semi-circular pine wood. For a height of 2.5 feet that ...


6

The most important aspect about controlling your dog on the leash is for your dog to understand that you are the one who leads and not the other way around. When your dog pulls you in a direction that you do not wish to go, or even in a direction that you wish to go but not at that pace then you are submitting to the dog's will and degrading your image of ...


6

While PeterJ's answer completes the question, for everyone's information, I gave up my amateur attempts to build my own ramp, and instead shelled out the dough for a 3-Step Pine Frame Dog RampSteps. Historical observation shows it generally sells for around $150 (I applied a $50 credit). The ramp works great in ramp mode, it's not intrusive, and it ...


5

Yes, this is absolutely normal; no, your baby isn't narcoleptic. Puppies sleep a lot -- just like babies and toddlers. If you take a look at this source, the estimated amount of sleep that a 16-week-old puppy should get is 18-20 hours/day. Gathering from my own personal experience and various sources across the web, I'd say the number is closer to 15-19 ...


5

They're called "vibrissae"-- they're not defects, they serve an important function. They're sensitive receptors, like a cat's whiskers. They pick up air currents and alert a dog to any movement or change in their immediate surroundings.


5

Just in case anyone comes across this and it helps them, we persevered with outside toilet training, and he is now going outside every time and we've only had a couple of accidents. At night, we have gone from him waking every 1-3 hours, to once per night, with a quick trip outside, then back in the crate until morning. This has only taken 1 week, but when ...


4

It is indeed a moan and is part of the natural range of vocalizations a dog uses. It can mean pretty much exactly what a human moan means. Some examples: Content at stretching after waking up Content at having that annoying itch scratched Content at laying down in a comfortable position Annoyance at being woken up Annoyance at being hugged too tightly As ...


4

That's pretty normal, our boys sometimes let it "rain" a bit under their mouths, if they smell other dogs. Although I'm not sure about the actual "foam". This might be an overreaction of some kind, but overall it's really hard to judge, because for some "foam" starts at 1-2 bubbles. If you're unsure, ask your vet.


4

your dog has an allergic reaction probably after a snake bite or an insect bite.get it to a vet right now. this is not the only answer to what it might be but the other things it might be will also need immidiate help from a vet. your dog is in danger get it to a vet right now.


4

No, don't worry. Those "bumps" are completely normal. All dogs got them, it just depends a bit on the race how well you can see them. They're very noticeable on our Husky for example. As you've noticed and others mentioned, they are the areas where the whiskers originate. Just check those three spots occasionally, as there might sit ticks right next to ...


4

Hot dogs are not bad for dogs in moderation but be careful because they are high in sodium and fat and low in real nutritional content. If you want to give fido a treat or use it for training I say go for it. Use common sense, you don't want to feed your dog hot dogs as their main food source just like you wouldn't recommend hot dogs as a staple food source ...


3

A dog will naturally use their mouth like we use our hands and so will pick up interesting things, like sticks, from time to time with their mouth. That's normal behavior in any dog and hard to correct for. She may also be teething, though it seems a tad early. Nevertheless, a teething puppy will chew and chew a lot. Much for the same reason we did the ...


3

Hot dogs do not provide a nutritionally balanced meal, are often high in fat, contain low quality meats, spices, dies, preservatives and a number of things your dog (or a person) does not need. Onions are toxic to cats and hot dogs often have onion powder and other spices. I don't know if they contain anything toxic to dogs. Feeding cats and dogs human food ...


2

I don't think it is normal per se, but it's surely not something to be concerned about. My dog, female, Dashshund X does not do it when she goes out. There are many possible normal reasons for it to happen. Very often it's a bit of car sickness that starts the process. Other dogs will salivate when they see or smell food. Other dogs or people can also cause ...


2

This behavior isn't uniquely odd and looks like she just enjoys the smell of whatever she's sniffing at and rubbing in. Dogs do this for a multitude of reasons. It could be because she doesn't like the smell of something already on her (do you spray her with something or bathe her? do you use cleaning products in your home that may get into her fur and make ...


2

I feel it's important to point out that if you have small dogs like I do (I have 3 and 4 pound Yorkshire Terriers) a hot dog is about the same size as their little throats. They can get stuck in the throat and it could kill your dog. If I'm giving my dogs a treat of hot dogs I cut them up really good.


2

I have a five year old Dachshund. I give her a little bit of finely cut up hot-dogs in her evening meal and she seems to do fine. Never more than a half of hot-dog. I also stick pills in a piece of hot-dog and she gobbles it up.


1

I'm a bit confused, because your vet should have been able to explain this behavior rather easily. I'm not 100% sure about the smell you describe -so could be something different-, but the rest absolutely sounds like acid reflux. So if your dog behaves normal otherwise and your dog didn't eat anything significant for hours before it's really just that. ...


1

There's a vital difference between crate training and obedience training. In obedience training, you say a command, your dog (hopefully) follows it and expects a reward for it. In crate training you put your dog into a place where it's supposed to stay for an undefined amount of time. The most desirable outcome is that your dog is calm and doesn't expect any ...


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