16

You say that you have scratching posts around your house, but they may not be the right type. Cats have definite preferences for scratching surfaces, and something about that chair makes it "better" than the posts. For example, we had a cat who LOVED to scratch on our ottoman. We had plenty of posts, but eventually figured out that we didn't have one tall ...


15

From my experience, attempts to stop cats from scratching things generally fail. Therefore I believe the best option is trim your cats claws every couple weeks so they don't do much damage: Trimming isn't that hard once you get used to it with most cats. Just wait until they are in a calm state You probably only have to do their front claws ( that is what ...


14

One option for "punishing" cats that works with some of them is to get a water spray bottle. You then spray them with it when they jump up on something you don't want them on. Please be sure to use a bottle that is just for water and never had any chemicals in it (could be harmful to them since it could get into their eyes and cats lick themselves a lot)


12

Two methods that I have found my cats respond to quite well: Some sort of loud noise: Clapping your hands Snapping your fingers (if you can do it loud enough) Placing some tin foil on the counter. I would make strips of foil and bend them in the middle so that they stand up (something like this) and place them on the edges of the counter. I placed them ...


9

Use vertical space. Keep breakables out of spaces the cat has access to, behind door or behind glass or at great heights (some cats can jump to the top of a fridge, so that's a minimum). You can train cats that there are surfaces they aren't allowed on but (a) you want to do that without the breakables present, (b) there is no guarantee they will behave ...


8

The technique I have settled on is to drape a "throw" (small blanket) over the chair arms that are the cat's preferred target. Depending on your decorating style, you can make it look like something you did just because it looks pretty. The throw doesn't need to reach the ground, or cover the entire chair, or anything dramatic like that. You just need to ...


8

I used to crush garlic and put the bits in a small amount of water, letting it stand overnight and then filtering the stuff out leaving only the garlic-smelling water, which I then used in a spray bottle to spray on the furniture I wanted to save from scratching. Sometimes I added vinegar and/or fresh lemon juice in with the garlic. I don't know what did the ...


8

You can always shut the door of the room where the chair is located. A firm/mild (as applicable) rebuke if the cat tries to scratch the chair. You said scratch posts are there everywhere in the house. But I think your cat needs motivation to scratch on them. Use the same old rewarding strategy to make him use the scratch posts. You can also trim the nails ...


8

We have a Chihuahua cross breed that is probably around the same size as a Dachshund that manages to climb up into a cubby house via the ramp. I've just measured the angle as 30 degrees and I get the impression from seeing him that if much steeper he'd find it difficult. That ramp is constructed from semi-circular pine wood. For a height of 2.5 feet that ...


8

Also, since you're not going to be in the kitchen all the time, you could consider getting one of the movement-activated hissing cans (sorry, I'm not at home and can't look up the brand information). That way, you can avoid the cat thinking that the only time it needs to avoid the counters is when you're there. The cans are about the size of a soda can, ...


8

I haven't had to do this with a dog, but I did have to do something similar for a 21 year old cat to get up to our bed. We staged it out with a ramp, a level surface, and a second ramp and it worked well for her. She could see, so sides weren't a consideration. So, the way I see it, there's two things to consider: The angle of the ramp. This is really ...


7

You're unlikely to be able to make the sofa inhospitable to the cats without also making it inhospitable to yourself, but there's steps you can take to minimize the damage they'll do. Ensure they have sufficient approved scratching surfaces; if they don't have many yet, add more before you get the sofa, so they get used to them and their locations, and are ...


7

My experience as a cat owner is that I get better results when my cat sees me spraying it, but it depends on what the problem is. The main reason we end up using a spray bottle is when we need the cats to leave a room and they decide to resist our instruction because they are being playful. A combination of first indicating to our cat what is expected and ...


6

I'm just addressing cats here. I actually grew up with dogs (not cats), but as an adult who owns cats, I've done a lot more study/reading of cat behavior and don't feel qualified to speak on dog behavior. Punishment rarely works because cats don't have a social structure that recognizes you as the dominant being in the home, they only understand that you're ...


6

While PeterJ's answer completes the question, for everyone's information, I gave up my amateur attempts to build my own ramp, and instead shelled out the dough for a 3-Step Pine Frame Dog RampSteps. Historical observation shows it generally sells for around $150 (I applied a $50 credit). The ramp works great in ramp mode, it's not intrusive, and it ...


6

The most popular cat tunnel on amazon has a 9.5 inch diameter. Cat doors on amazon seem to all be in the 7-9 inch range as well. I have a 15 pound cat, and got her an 11 inch diameter tunnel. She can navigate that just fine, so you probably won't have to go over 11 inches, even for a very large cat.


5

Think walls! Put up shelves all over the place, at different levels. I know someone who made a cat high-way in the house at about 7 feet. He put up shelves at that height in most of the rooms and made holes above doors to allow unfettered travel. He framed the wholes quite nicely and put trim around them so, while they do get your attention the first time ...


5

Nothing is immune to cat claws (except maybe actual rock, but that doesn’t make for nice couch cushions). Instead, provide your cat with plenty of other things to scratch in the same room. Different cats love different methods of scratching, so it may take some observing and trial/error to find out what your cat likes best. I’ve had a lot success with ...


4

We had a similar problem with our cats destroying a pretty expensive couch. After checking with the vet, he recommended we spray the favourite scratching parts of the couch with Feliway, which is a synthetic reproduction of the feline pheromone cats use for territory marking and etc. We combined spraying the couch daily with the Feliway with spraying a ...


4

Never use a spray bottle...all that does is make your cat afraid of you! According to behaviorist Pam Johnson Bennett, The squirt bottle technique only accomplishes three things: It creates frustration in the cat It causes the cat to become afraid of you The cat learns to wait until you aren’t around before engaging in the behavior ...


4

Kyle is right, Negative reinforcement is probably the best solution to a problem like this, since you cant really reward them for not going on the counter and expect them to understand. If your finding it hard to always keep a spray bottle near the counter cats usually respond to yelling as well also make sure your cats are'nt doing it because they know it ...


4

SOLVIT vs EASIPET Having looked at images for both the Solvit and Easipet, I can tentatively conclude that they are the same product sold through different distributors. STEPS ALTERNATIVE I was building my own ramp for my dachshunds, who are prone to back problems, so I understand your concern / need for a ramp. Rather than a ramp, which you state will ...


4

There are a lot of variables when choosing a tunnel. Concrete forms in 8,10 & 12 inches sizes can be found at your local DIY store for around $5. Buy one of each and bring it home for a trial. We use them a lot with Rabbits but they work good for cats also. They are easy to get, returns are easy, and if you like them they are inexpensive to own and ...


4

You could increase the fiber in the diet just like a human would with this issue. A fiber supplement (food or pills) may reduce the chance of this happening by helping the stools stay firm and not runny. Also have a vet check to see if the dog is leaking at all, maybe a more significant health issue.


4

I do not believe there is a specific diet which will ensure that no feces remains on a dog's backside. Having a poor diet might make this problem worse for the dog (due to loose stools or diarrhea), but diet alone will not prevent it. The alternative that we use is to check our dog's behind after she eliminates and wipe off anything that "hangs out" ...


4

The best solution to your problem is to get a good scratching post for your cats. If you get a scratching post for your cats, they likely will not use your sofa at all to sharpen their claws. A god scratching post needs to be heavy so your cat is not able to move it. This means it must weigh 15-20 kilos or more. The scratching surface must be made of sisal ...


4

Water is heavy! A tank like this can easily contain hundreds of kgs of water. That is a lot of weight. That means that a fishtank needs to be structurally sound in order to keep all that water inside, out of your living room. In a project like this, where you have a wooden cabinet around your fishtank, it's important that the pressure of the water isn't put ...


4

I have two cats, some good scratching posts / cat trees and a sofa. One cat scratches on sisal only. The other scratches everything next to her whenever she feels like scratching or stretching. She does stop immediately when told so, but for sensible textiles that is too late. So far (after three years!) no scratching damage is visible on the sofa. I can ...


3

First of all, all dogs like to be on furniture because it satisfies their instinct to be in a heightened place where they can overlook their surroundings. The physical height can also be an indicator of their rank (I'll come back to that later). So, is it bad? No. As far as humans are concerned, there are very different reasons why people don't want their ...


3

You might wish to try a DIY-type solution using basic "percale" style bedsheets. These are the bog-standard style of smooth, tightly-woven fabric; very easy to get, and, conveniently, a texture cats don't typically care to claw on. Depending on the size and construction of your pieces, you may be able to purchase fitted sheets that can be wrapped ...


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