Hot answers tagged

50

That was probably a little too much in one go for a puppy. Puppies learn natural dog behavior from their mothers and rudimentary human behavior from their mother's owners (that's called socializing). They are most trusting and confident in situations they experienced in a positive way during socializing. Everything above and beyond makes them insecure until ...


13

One thing to keep in mind is to not try to comfort your pet. If you secure your pet by using a gentle voice to calm him, it confirms his fear! You are actually telling your dog that it is normal to be scared. The best thing to do is act normal, completely ignore his fear, talk to him normally, play with him as you would normally do and do not allow him to ...


11

Cats often leave their "prey" or toys as gifts to show their sign of affection and their craft as master hunters. Leaving them in places where the cat knows you will be is their way of trying to get your attention for a job well done. My female cat does this often with me too and I will often praise her for her good work (Tell her good job and pet her a ...


10

It is quite normal that the dog is feeling unsure or unsecure if left alone in an unknown place. The key here is to train / condition the dog beforehand. So don't just "lock" him downstair and leave for the night. Try to leave him there and proceed with tiny steps, leave for 1 minute, 2, 5, 10 etc. It might seem useless at the beginning but here you have ...


10

I have had great luck with Thundershirts in calming my pets, both cats and dogs. If that doesn't work, give the dog a safe place to go, like their crate, may provide some relief. Putting the crate in a location away from the external walls may help some as well.


10

First of all, if your cat is still not drinking, eating, or going to the litterbox, take it back to the vet. Not doing these things for so long is very serious. Unless your cat is normally very skittish, nervous, or easily spooked, I don't think the problem is that it's scared of the balloon. For one thing, some cats might be scared of balloons, but it's ...


10

It sounds like the experience was just as traumatic for you as it was for your pup. You will both "get over it" in time. Don't coddle the pup and act like you have to compensate for the way you treated him while you were doing those parenting things. He won't understand what's going on and he could become insecure from the apparent mood swings. Instead... ...


9

Your dog is apparently experiencing separation anxiety. What it appears you have done is given the dog the run of the house. While you were correct in trying crate training, obviously that won't work due to his behavior and tendencies to try and escape. I am going to suggest you confine him to a single room when you depart, if you haven't already. It ...


9

While both sevargdcg and Salketer provide great advice for how to deal with your dog's anxiety as it occurs, long-term you want to work on lowering your dog's sensitivity to noises. You can buy CDs online that have fireworks and other noises specifically to help desensitise your dogs, but you'll probably find plenty of the requisite noises on YouTube as ...


8

Time is the key really, if she spent long enough on the streets struggling for food that her weight had dropped substantially below "normal" for her then it's going to take some time for her to relax about it and trust that food really is coming on a regular basis, not "going away" again and she doesn't have any competition for it. Sounds like you are doing ...


6

how is it going? Your description makes me think of a dog that might have been a nice, even beloved homebody dog who developed into an unmanageable training drop-out so that his owners despaired of being able to keep him - and hoped to give him a chance with somebody else. Supposedly he knows some training 'helpers', starting with stopping when he pulls ...


6

I had this same issue with our dog. It sounds like separation anxiety. We solved the issue by using counter conditioning. Basically, you want to make the thing she fears (your leaving) associated with something she loves. For our dog, it was a treat in a Kong. It takes our dog about 20 minutes to get the treat out of a Kong. When we left, we gave her ...


6

Separation anxiety aside, cats just don't like closed doors! To deal with the feeding issue, perhaps you can arrange something where they are not really separated, but the female can protect her food a bit more easily. One option might be to find a cat-sized box, put it on its side, and place the female's food in it. Her body will block access to her food. ...


6

I have dealt with separation anxiety with a lot of dogs I rescued and here is what my experience tells me: First, a change of environment for a dog is a major thing, regardless of age breed or character. She has never shown this behaviour in the two places we've lived before. The fact is that she probably has but you’ve not really notice. This time you’...


6

Have you tried a thundershirt? They are relatively inexpensive and provide a sort of "hug" for your dog in moments when it is anxious. I have a very reactive dog to people coming over to the house, and this seems to keep her calmer. I also know friends who swear by the Thundershirt for their dog during fireworks or lightening storms.


6

I give my dogs a shower instead of a bath. They're much calmer standing "in the rain" than in a pool of water.


5

I'd recommend taking her to the vet immediately because often times this is a sign of a health condition that may need medical attention. She may have pain or discomfort from a more serious problem, or it could be something very minor like a skin irritation. This may be related to anxiety from the moving but since you moved a almost a year ago it may be ...


5

Consider Doggy Daycare There are already a number of other answers to this question, and many great suggestions. One that has not yet been mentioned is doggy daycare. Dogs are social creatures. Even dogs that don't have clinical separation anxiety generally benefit from higher levels of companionship and supervision. Dog-walkers or dog-sitters will come to ...


5

I am very sorry to hear about your kitty problems. Given the description you've given, it seems like a very complex problem. You've done the right things, trying the reintroduction process and having plenty of vertical space for the cats. I would definitely get your vet involved. It almost seems like your male cat may have something medical going on, ...


5

Patience. Gifts / treats. Try to free some time so spend with the cat. Just sit / lay somewhere, with the cat around. It is important that she understands you do not have intentions to hurt her. Talking to her would help. Having handy some of her favorite treats will definitely help. Keep the treats in your hand, let the cat build the courage to come and ...


4

"he's frequently exhibiting scared dog body language and shaking." At the risk of sounding like a shill, I cannot recommend the Thundershirt enough for anxiety issues, as this has resolved many problems with my perpetually nervous dog. To maintain control, you could go with a thick 6-foot leash, and possibly a harness. Checking the same site above, they ...


4

The suggestions by littlekellilee are all very good ones and should reduce most problem urination. That said it sounds like he is "pissed off" and this is how he is relieving himself. Suggestions 1 & 2 are great for most problem urination ones but maybe not this situation (though they can only make the situation better- not worse). 3 Can help let him ...


4

Cats generally prefer to go in a litterbox. There's a few things you can try: 1) Get a larger litter box. Maybe he doesn't think the size is big enough and is finding it difficult to use because of the cone. A larger one may make it easier for him. 2) Get several litter boxes and put them around the house. It'll make it easier for him to see it and he ...


4

There is an answer at How to leash train a rabbit? that addresses putting the harness on, so I won't go in to it here. As for holding your rabbit; holding a rabbit is problematic for two main reasons. They are built light and fast and a fall or jump from chest height (4 feet) on you can and does cause serious injury and or death to rabbits. Rabbits are ...


4

I would consider that separation anxiety. Separation anxiety is widely used as a general term covering dogs that are stressed when left alone, and messing in the house and destructive behaviour is pretty standard. It often does come out when the dog is stressed by being left by the primary care-giver, but it's not uncommon for dogs to be OK with a person ...


4

I'm going to guess that part of the reason why your cat was so bad when your friend visited is because it had no place that it felt truly safe from your visitor. I'm guessing, based on the fact that your cat was hiding under the couch, that your cat had no hiding options that didn't force it to possibly cross paths with your friend if it were to come out, ...


4

There are probably real reasons for them to seek a different place to sleep. Some that came to my mind are: Their bed gets wet at night from fog or dew and they found themselves a dry bed. Their beds are in an unprotected place and your dogs found a place that stays warmer at night. There are animals like cats, racoons or badgers visiting at night. Your ...


3

My Thundershirt Experience My cat Juliet has severe anxiety such that it gives her interstitial cystitis (it's a bladder condition that they think is caused by stress). She's pretty much afraid of everything that moves. I bought a Thundershirt and tried it on her several times, but the process of getting her in it upset her so much that I immediately ...


3

Others have already explained the theory behind why it generally works so I just wanted to add some additional info about what your expectations should be. The Thundershirt requires at least a week or two of gradual training (if not more) to really get your cat comfortable with the idea of it. It's possible your cat will absolutely hate it at first so you ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible