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17

"Crating" a dog is putting a dog in a crate with the door closed for whatever reason. The major benefit of using a crate with a young puppy is to prevent the puppy from learning bad habits when it is not being closely supervised. A puppy that is confined to its crate will not be peeing on the floor or chewing up your shoes. It also teaches the pup to settle ...


7

I have a 6 month old Springer Spaniel, so a few months ago, I was in your position, and going a bit nuts. I understood the purpose of crate training as being to only allow the dog to go toilet outside. In my experience, it is IMPOSSIBLE to achieve this at 8 weeks. Dogs at that age can only hold in their bladders for approximately 2 hours. I was up all night ...


6

It sounds like you're off to a great start. Basically, you're trying to set the fundamentals in place, right now. Just keep telling yourself that no matter how much work it seems like, you're doing yourself a favor. If you instill good habits in your pup now, you won't have to continuously worry about things for the rest of his life. A few month of work now, ...


5

Puppies do not begin to develop bladder control until around 6 months old. It's not fully developed until around a year of age. What this means is that your puppy is not physically capable of holding it, no matter how small or large a space you keep her in. Will giving her less space help to her learn to hold it longer? Yes. Dogs naturally do not want ...


5

Not sure if you have tried this already .... But I've been through this too and it's not fun. So I hope this might help. Not an expert or anything on this but with my puppy, (German shepherd) one thing that helped her settle to crate training was leaving her in there for short periods of time. I would put her in, leave the room and come in and treat her ...


5

It is fine to constrain one dog while keeping the other dog free to roam; this is common in many households where one dog is more comfortable being crated, or needs to be quarantined for any reason. Consider if the dog was injured and needed to be kept from the other dogs; this is the same sort of situation. We have an elderly dog who will roam at night ...


4

Assuming you're taking him home from the breeder at around 8 weeks of age, he's still in his critical (socialisation) period, meaning that they are very open to new experiences and won't have a priori a fear reaction. Also the pup should already be socialised to humans and be confident being handled by humans. So what I would recommend: take something with ...


4

Two points should be made here. First: your puppy is not able to control it's bladder fully yet! No matter it it realises it will sit in pee or not, it will need to go. The general rule to follow is: your puppy can control it's bladder for one hour for each month of age. So, at 2 months, that's 2 hours, at 3 months, that's 3 hours, and so on. Second: The ...


4

I agree with Layna, toilet training and crate training are 2 different things. A crate should be a sanctuary for your puppy, a place of safety, a place of her own where she/he can retreat safely, like a den in the wild. There's several ways to train your puppy to use the crate but this is what I did: First make it comfortable with blankets and old duvets. ...


4

You're right, it really is just too long. Most healthy adult dogs can hold urine for about 8-9 hours maximum. And asking them to routinely go longer is inhumane. Crating him may work in the short term, but at the risk of his mental state as he forces himself to hold it for that long- in addition to the incredible boredom and lack of access to water that ...


3

Cut an old yoga mat to size of the floor of the crate, adding an additional inch on each side as to match the curve. Add strips of Velcro across the bottom width of the mat and the crate floor every 5 inches. Attach mat to floor of crate and seal all edges of mat at crate curve with duct tape as to alleviate the puppies from pulling up the mat and chewing it....


3

- Are my dogs doing this (peeing in their food and water bowls) to spite me? They have no medical problems as I have gotten them evaluated multiple times in the last 2 or 3 months. Dogs aren't capable of acting out in spite. They don't have the requisite level of consciousness to do so. Dogs behave in whatever way works more effectively to get their ...


3

It sounds like you need to try a gradual process to getting him used to separation. His problem of peeing in his crate (if due to separation anxiety) will not go away by simply getting him used to the crate. If the issue for him is being left alone, this is the issue that needs to be addressed first. He may be terrified of going into the crate if he has ...


3

I think the puppy needs to go to it's crate on it's own and not by being forced to go there. The only solution is to make it feel like the crate is it's own house. Leave it's food plate and water plate next to it, have a nice blanket or pillow inside it and maybe leave a toy inside. This will make the dog want to go there when sleepy (what's best than ...


3

Step one: Don't leave a puppy unattended for long periods of time. A puppy can't hold it for too long (this is why there's pee and poo around your house) You can't train him if your away for so long Crate won't help, unless you're there to train him, which you're not. Step two: Try to be committed to the dog, having a dog is a HUGE responsibility, he is ...


3

My specific solution was moving the crate too our bedroom and get him a hot water bottle in his crate. The hot water bottle on itself got him to sleep better but he still woke up too early. This morning I actually had to wake him up. Putting this up as an answer because neither of the answers were the solution.


3

Think about get him a new friend, It is lonely being alone. While neither of you may want to get a puppy, there are many mature dogs at local shelters that need a home. Our local shelter will allow you (actually they insist) that the current dog and the potential new dog meet at the shelter to see if it will work out. You may also want to consider a ...


3

I have had this identical problem with my dog. He pined all night long for his mate (who had passed away), and he wouldn't be quiet until I took him outside. As harsh as it may sound considering the circumstances, I simply ignored him after lights-out. No matter how much he barked and whined, I didn't give him the attention he wanted (for the seven hours ...


3

This happened once and lasted 10-15 minutes? If so, it's normal and just coincidence that it followed a vet visit. Nothing the vet gave him had anything to do with it. A puppy of that age is likely to holler a bit before giving up and going to sleep. Unless it becomes a chronic problem it's nothing to worry about. My suggestion for dealing with it is ...


3

I may edit when you have answered the questions in the comment. A start from what I gather from your post: You puppy well may be clingy because she was separated too early. 8 weeks should be minimum, 12 weeks are better.. but that is a whole different matter, I am just mentioning it because you said she is very clingy :). Regarding the crate: Restart! If ...


3

First of all, you will need to figure out why they are barking. Only then you can try working on the solution. Dogs bark for a number of reasons. It could be because of boredom, or they might be afraid of something. Sometimes it's just attention grabbing thing for them, and sometimes it can be a medical condition. And based on the cause, the solution ...


3

This depends on various factors which is probably why the advice is conflicting. Factor 1: Is your puppy comfortable being in the crate open/closed? Some puppies take easier to crate training than others. If your puppy is still very uncertain or unhappy with being in the crate with the door closed, or being in the crate at all, then rather leave the door ...


3

No, crates aren't necessary. I had 4 different dogs while growing up at my parents house and we never owned a single crate. My personal dog that I have now has his own crate, and I love it for the peace of mind that he can't ever get into the garbage or anything while I'm out or while I'm sleeping. But That kind of stuff rarely happened with my dogs as a ...


3

Dogs don't need a crate but it's OK to have one if you wish. Normally there are two reasons to have a crate for your dogs. One is to help you control your dog when you're not around for a longer period of time (i.e. being at work). Not as a substitute for training your dog to behave in the house when unsupervised, but rather for situations in which ...


3

What you have is a working breed, a dog bread historically for a job. These dogs tend to be highly active and have buckets of drive to work and play. Not to mention she is young too so she will be even more active because of her youthful vibrance. They typically command a lot of attention from owners and can grow bored and be destructive very quickly if they ...


2

I would start with 1 crate when first teaching him to love the crate, but once he's gotten that down, you can easily transfer the value into a new crate. We've taught our dog that "go to bed" just means run to the nearest empty crate. It might help to first start with similar style crates before transitioning to a different style so she gets the idea that ...


2

I have volunteered for a rescue that performs frequent cat transportation (and my youngest, Romeo, traveled to me in Maryland from Florida). The rescue uses a large carrier and adds a small litter pan. The litter pans are usually labelled "kitten size" at the pet supply store and do not take up more than 1/2 of the carrier. The remaining space in the ...


2

Huskies are one of the whinniest dogs we see (German shepherds are a close second). You absolutely cannot give him attention when he cries, this rewards the behavior. They are energetic dogs that need a lot of exercise, to help with him having a better sleep go for a run before bedtime. Tucker him out so that he wants to sleep, can even try using the DAP ...


2

Toilet training is all about positive reinforcement. It sounds like your puppy has got the hang of using a specific place to toilet nice and quickly, which is great. What you need to do now is get him to change where that place is. Toilet training requires a lot of patience and vigilance on your part, and consistency is the key. Whenever you are at home and ...


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