18

I'm sorry to tell you that, but your approach is wrong. That's not how you train separation and independence with your dog. What you currently do is training a command. You say a specific word, your dog does what is expected of her and she gets a reward. There is a clearly defined beginning (the word) and a clearly defined ending (getting a reward). Most ...


5

That is so adorable! (If annoying.) I'd try giving your dog its own soft things, so maybe it will prefer those instead, and leave your bedroom alone. I've heard that greyhounds in particular get attached to plush dog toys, and sometimes carry them all around the house, so you might try giving your dog those too. It could be that your dog isn't actually ...


5

If he's not interested in toys (some dogs just are like that) I propose engaging his nose instead. Treats with a strong scent (like cheese, sausage or fish) can easily distract a dog and redirect their mind. You could, for example, play a version of the hat game / shell game with him. Put 3 desert bowls upside down on the floor, then make him sit and wait. ...


4

The FIRST thing I would be concerned about is getting an Australian Shepherd (mini or not) when living in an apartment and having to leave the dog alone for several hours each day. Are you experienced with this particular breed? If not, please reconsider your choice of dog breed. This is a recipe for disaster and neither you nor your dog will be happy. ...


4

She calms down only after someone of us comes to her and pets her. If you respond to her meowing by giving her attention, then you are teaching her to meow for attention. This is a negative feedback loop of your own creation. You're rewarding her when she meows for attention while you're hoping that she eventually stops meowing for attention. Without a ...


3

This sounds a lot like separation anxiety. He doesn't deliberately misbehave to annoy you. First things first: If you want to reprimand a dog (or any animal), you have to do it within 3 seconds of the unwanted behavior. Dragging your dog to his poop upstairs and yelling at him is not going to change a single thing. Your dog doesn't understand why you are ...


3

I can't help but feel, first off: whether Husky or not, this is a dog with a strong bond to you; and really, you and your family and pets are her pack. I'm tempted to add, what else seems obvious. (And with the background story, you're probably her true and only Alpha.) Further seeming obvious, and so it feels, to this dog your brother isn't even part of her ...


2

The first thing to say, sadly, is that depending on your mum's situation she may not be able to take care of a pup that requires constant company. Also, this kind of dangerously severe anxiety requires a professional trainer. That said: generally if a dog is stressed by something, calmly lead them just far enough away from that thing that the anxiety ...


2

The solution was to: Keep it busy (aka quiet), when possible, by: Letting it sit on people. Be around other pets. Tire it out via a mouse-on-a-stick toy. When the above is not possible, put the cat in a room that is out of earshot (with all the amenities, of course). The cat will yell as much as it needs to, without driving people insane. Eventually, the ...


1

Your older cat is male. If he isn't neutered, the chances that he will ever accept another cat in his territory are very slim. Male cats aren't very social creatures and usually choose not to live together with other cats. In your special situation, the male cat has lived alone and has claimed the whole house as his territory. Now there's a new cat that he ...


1

Separation anxiety is always hard to combat and you need to have lots of patience. I strongly advise against talking to your dog via baby cam. I once saw a Youtube video (sorry but I can't find it anymore) where a trainer explained that it only increases the anxiety of the dog. The dog knows you're gone because he cannot hear the sound of your steps or your ...


1

In addition to Grim's answer, I suggest training "stay" with him. You can make the training fun and rewarding for him by training "stay, then get the treat" or "stay, then catch the toy", depending on what your dog responds best to. You must train this several times daily and work your way up from just a second to longer times. ...


1

There's a vital difference between crate training and obedience training. In obedience training, you say a command, your dog (hopefully) follows it and expects a reward for it. In crate training you put your dog into a place where it's supposed to stay for an undefined amount of time. The most desirable outcome is that your dog is calm and doesn't expect any ...


1

Since this is only happening when he is alone at home, it may be difficult to remove the behavior through direct training. My first recommendation is to prevent your dog from going upstairs when you are not home. Baby gates are often useful for this, or just strategically placed objects blocking him from going upstairs. See what happens when he is not able ...


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