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12

The wire bottom cages can cause a condition called bumblefoot. It can be very painful for your guinea pig and you're better off springing for a cage with a solid bottom. This condition can also occur in rats. It's the reason we got a solid bottom cage when I had them. Ulcerative pododermatitis, also known as bumblefoot, is an extremely painful infection ...


11

In short, no. Tortoises and hamsters have different needs for their habitats. While some hamsters might live in the desert in the wild, any hamster you buy in the store will have been bred inside for so long that, among other things, they've evolved to live at a normal room temperature (60-75 °F / 16-24 °C). Meanwhile tortoises simply ...


11

To be honest I don't think any type of paint applied to a bird cage after the fact is a good idea. The paint that is applied to a bird cage is the negatively charged powder type that is typical in industrial processes where you want to ensure a strong long term bond to a smooth metal surface. The metal cage pieces are positively charged while the paint is ...


9

Regardless of floor choice, remember that they need a burrow-like "safe" area to cope with stress. Many pet rabbit hutches have BOTH a mesh floor portion and a little "house" like portion that has a solid floor with bedding. These are not used industrially because they take up much more space and require bedding changes. You'll need to decide based on your ...


8

If the hamster is constantly trying to get out, this could be a sign that the cage is too small. In my personal experience I've seen several hamsters with negative behaviour traits (aggression and/or constant bar chewing) have their behaviour improve after being moved to a larger cage. I did have one hamster who would bar chew regardless of cage size;I have ...


6

Mice are known to be capable of getting through 1/4 inch wide gaps. You will have to change your cage to something more escape-proof. Without knowing what your cage looks like, I must assume your cage only has vertical bars. You have 2 options: Keep the mouse in a cage with vertical AND horizontal bars (crossbars). The problem here is that the mouse may ...


6

It depends on the breed of hamster. If it is a Syrian hamster, its cage needs to be at least 360 square inches of floor space or more (12 inches by 30 inches). But if it's a Chinese hamster, or any of the dwarf breeds, it needs 288 square inches or more (12 inches by 24 inches, or 1 foot by 2 feet). Make sure to add lots of toys such as tubes, hideouts, ...


6

Putting a rabbit into a cage can be difficult. With the cage you have, the best solution is to have them hop back in by themselves. Even a rabbit that is extremely used to being handled can/will "struggle and flail" during the transition from being held to being put down. I have an 8 year old rabbit (Ruby) who will happily sit on my lap for an hour or ...


5

For most small rodents, such as rats or mice, I would look to use hardwood wood shavings (aspen is usually easily found, depends on where you are). Avoid softwood shavings, such as pine or cedar as they're known to be very problematic and not just for rats and mice. There is also other bedding options, commercially available, made from recycled papers that ...


5

Cages do need to be rather large. Buying typical pet store cages is generally a bad idea. Most of them (at least at my pet store) are far too small and even unsafe for our hamsters. Many pet companies are only in it for the money, not the safety and welfare of our pets. Many people recommend cages as small as 24x12 inch cages, but many experienced owners ...


4

Looking at the opinions of other keepers and internet consultants the safest and most recommended/used substrate for parrot cages is paper. Newspaper and white or brown butcher paper are mentioned on ALL personal sites.


4

The symptoms you are describing is often called 'cage aggression', rabbits can be very protective of THEIR space. It can take several forms, from growling to lunging to biting. It will generally decrease as the bunny gets more comfortable with you, but THEIR house is THEIRS, and until you are fully accepted as part of their warren, you may have issues. ...


4

As John say's in his comment, there is some possibility that the Tung oil is toxic to rabbits. When we built the 3 story condo below (Dec 2009), we did a a lot of research. Latex was ok in theory, but there was some questions about it. We ended up going with a soy paint the brand we choose was DuraSoy this was applied over plywood. It has been 4 years ...


4

Wire mesh cages are almost always a bad choice for rabbits. They may get an infection on their feet called sorax from having wire bottom cages. Rabbits, Chinchillas, and Ferrets can all get sore hocks. Also Guinea Pigs, Hamsters, and gerbils may get their feet stuck in between the wire which good result in a broken limb. Pros: Much easier to clean and ...


4

I'm not very familiar with bird cages and how they sit in the plastic tray, but guinea pig owners have been using coroplast for the bottom tray in custom cages for many years (I think I first heard of it nearly 20 years ago). The benefit of coroplast is that it's a surface very similar to plastic (non-absorbent, cleans with a bit of soap/water), but you can ...


4

I am going by the numbers German pet-experts give; those are numbers for "this hamster will be really really happy", not "the hamster can manage with this", and are way above what the average store would ever give you. Good thing about Hamsters and connected cages: they like tunnels anyway, so expansion is quiet manageable. What worries me about the cage ...


4

I do know very little about hamsters but i know dandelions and cat grass/wheat grass is safe for hamsters. I found this information on the net http://www.petwebsite.com/hamsters/hamster_plants_flowers.asp Alyssum Asters Bramble leaves Blackberry leaves Burnet Chickweed Clover Coltsfoot Cornflowers Cow Parsley ...


3

Wire bottom cages can be bad for guinea pigs. They get a condition called bumblefoot. Also if the bars are too far apart their feet can get stuck in between and injure them. Also rabbits shouldn’t even have wire bottom cages because they get sores on their back feet


3

I got a rabbit cage for my guinea pig. I put a piece of plastic to cover the wire mesh. You can get the plastic at Ace Hardware. You have to measure the cage to see how big the cage is. My guinea pig loves it. Make sure the cage is big enough for your guinea pig


3

Since the risks and pitfalls of wire floors are largely mentioned, I'll mention pros... If you are a gardener, the waste of a rabbit can be the best fertilizer you've ever used. My vegetables go absolutely crazy on rabbit poo. The wire also allows the non-hutch area to remain cleaner. There is a sweet spot where the wire squares are small enough to be comfy ...


3

Should I use cardboard? Does it make sense to hang the bottom of a cardboard box in a cage for a cockatiel? Birds LOVE boxes, this is a great idea! Is cardboard safe? Cardboard is very safe, I make many toys with cardboard boxes (cereal boxes, cookie boxes etc.) - they tend to make very good foraging opportunities. When to not use boxes Some birds ...


3

Get a cheap/used aquarium or glass/plastic habitat with a netted top until she grows large enough that she can't fit through the bars on her intended habitat. It shouldn't take more than a month or so for her to grow large enough.


3

What I like to use is shredded paper, because even though it is nessicary to clean it often, it has proven to be the more comfortable option for my mice. It is very easy for them to burrow in, and they can move and rip it as they please to build up on theirs “ house”. It is also really cheap. I can get many months out of one 3 dollar bag, it is also very ...


3

So, somewhere on the cage (usually towards bottom front corner of cage), there's a brand label ex. Prevue, Ph, LM etc. Many companies have online websites where you can search for your cage type, find it's "style # and name, and then order "replacement parts". If their site is hard to maneuver, you can look up and call the companies consumer hotline or 1-800#...


2

Depending on what you are using the lab rat for, this should be a very careful decision. They are many studies analyzing different types of cage beddings and many have advantages and disadvantages. As I do not know what you are using your rat for, I will provide you with a very useful document and allow you to decide. This document is from animalethics.org ...


2

James, A few things to keep in mind... Cage bar spacing for standard budgies (parakeets) or English budgies should not be greater than 1/2 inch (12.7 mm), or they can get their heads stuck between the cage bars. Some budgies are quite small, and cage bar spacing of 3/8 inch (9.5 mm) is necessary. The cage you're looking at is lovely, but it is designed for ...


2

Similar answer. We have African Grays ; they love to spend most of the day shredding flat cardboard. We put a small box in the females cage, she soon stated laying eggs which involved screaming so we removed the box.


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