45

The short answer to this is yes, "technically" it's possible to put a litter box on a balcony in winter, but it's not at all realistic and will not work out in any way. You can, after all, put anything that physically fits on a balcony. Addressing the issues in no particular order, we'll start with weather. The cat will need to access it, not only in the ...


25

First, immediately stop the activity of rubbing his face in it. This is completely counterproductive, the kitten is not going to make that association, and is going to see this as abusive and become fearful of you. That advice is brutally bad, it boggles the mind. Second, 6 weeks is way too early to separate a kitten from the mother, 8 weeks is minimum, 12 ...


22

The first step for a responsible pet owner when their pet exhibits a significant change (such as described here) is to take the animal to the vet to make sure that there are no health problems. Health problems can cause litter box issues in several ways. A cat with urinary pain (an infection or stones anywhere in the system) will associate that pain with ...


19

Just because both dogs have been getting the same reprimands does not mean they will react the same way. If the female has more of a submissive personality to begin with, which it sounds like from your other statements, she is very likely to have a stronger fear response. As a result, she is learning to associate her name -- or at least, her name when called ...


17

Ultimately positive praise, reward, and repetition are the keys. When taking him out after meals, try to direct your dog to the particular area in which you would like him to relieve himself. You will have to stay with him and try to encourage him to remain in that area until he goes. Once he does, provide him with positive praise and rewarding him (food ...


17

Housebreaking doesn't work simply by putting a dog in his crate. There are things you need to work on even when the dog isn't inside his crate to make sure he learns where he can go and where he cant. The first thing you have to realize is what you're doing is working. Your dog isn't broken, and your on the right track. Many people have similar issues, and ...


17

Punishing him by locking him in a cage is NOT the answer. In fact, punishment when it comes to litter-training issues in general is counterproductive, but locking the poor mite in a cage is just plain cruel. Assuming there are no medical issues going on (and it doesn't sound like there are, as you say you've had him checked over) then you just need to ...


17

Your cat is not jealous of the new child. Your cat is stressed out. Most cats like calm, quiet, routine, and for their territory to not be disrupted. Unfortunately, with a new baby, all those things tend to go out the window. It seems to be a rather common reaction when new parents bring their child home, for their cat to start eliminating in locations where ...


14

Some cats are diggers and there's not much you can do about it. A covered box is an option but traps odors, so monitor the situation carefully. (One of my cats wouldn't go into a covered box at all, even clean -- claustrophic, I guess.) I just keep a broom and dustpan handy; it's less hassle than cleaning up outside-of-box rebellions. A suggestion I've ...


14

You can get a drip pan for under a car at the auto parts store for about $10(US) it is about 24 inches by 36 inches. Place towel over it to provide traction and absorption for the cat getting in and to catch anything trying to leave. You may want to use a layer of anti-slip cabinet lining between the drip tray and the towel. Place the litter box on the ...


13

We use cat genies, and their specialized pellets track worse than anything I've ever seen. I once found a pellet on the floor in the restroom at work. The best solution we've found for catching litter is the LitterTrap Mat, which we place at the entrance to the box (I guess you would put it on the ground wherever they jump into/out of the box). We also ...


13

Cats, even young ones (who tend to be more adaptable), can react badly to changes in their environments. It sounds like you have moved the cat (you just got her a week ago from a previous owner), given her access to more of your living space (not just one room), and changed her litter. Anecdotally, changes in food and litter types often cause problems, ...


13

As a cancer patient, your risk may be higher than another person's due to the possibility of being immunocompromised. I would consult with your doctor to get a better assessment as to the risk. Immunocompromised people can own pets safely, but they must take much more precaution, and therefore such a person might not consider pet ownership to be worth the ...


12

...rabbits can be easily trained to use a litter tray, sometimes with more reliability than your average cat! The natural instinct of a wild rabbit to use one area as its latrine is still apparent in its domestic counterparts. (1) The actual process is very similar to pad training a dog or litter box training a cat. Keep the rabbit confined to a small ...


12

In my experience rabbits are very easy to housebreak. They like to pee and poop in the same place every time, so in most cases all you have to do is put a little bit of their waste in the litter box and they will happily use the litter box. It is very important that if they go somewhere else, miss the edge or kick waste out of the box that you clean it up ...


12

The first and most obvious step here is to fix or replace the cat flap as soon as possible. If the neighbor's cat can't get in, he can't spray inside the house. Do this first because any cleaning you do will just get sprayed over (Obviously, you need to clean enough that your nose can't pick up the cat pee smell). If the neighbor's cat is the culprit, there'...


12

Add a second litter box to the house. It is not unusual for any animal to get overly protective of 'their' litter box. I have seen this behavior in both cats and rabbits. It is generally solved by adding a second litter box some distance from the first. While the more aggressive pet might want to protect both boxes, it is logistically difficult to do ...


12

You are doing the right things so far. Another thing to watch out for is eye contact. My dog does the same thing and when she greets people I ask them to ignore her and avoid eye contact. Sometimes even eye contact will be enough to make her pee when she is really excited and wanting the visitor to pay attention to her. Once he is starting to calm down, ...


12

It is not fair to the cat to demand it does his/her pooping/peeing outside in the cold. What are you going to do if the cat refuses to go outside for its pooping/peeing and does this inside your house; cats can be a lot more stubborn than you can ever imagine. Cats and all other pets come as a complete package so you will have to take both the good and the ...


11

After meals, I take my dog to a particular place, somewhere near a field in my house. I say to him in my mother tongue for him to poo. As you all know, pets follow reflex actions, after somedays practice he will understand what you want him to do. But sometimes, I also observe rather than you picking an appropriate place for him, he will choose one himself, ...


11

Urination like this is often a result of either fear or excitement and excitement is clearly not the case. So, I'm basically convinced that it's because of striking her. Physical punishment, like that, can lead to extreme fear which, in turn, can lead to urination happening out of that fear. Basically, she now believes that when you call her name that you'...


11

A stressed cat will sometimes cower it its litter box, as the remaining smell of her body from earlier uses will make her feel safe. This doesn't seem to be what is going on here. Kittens will sometimes dig for 'practice' when young or because they like the feel of digging. This may be what you have, in which case you can just ignore it. If you want her ...


11

She is obviously aware that it is a bad thing. She typically hides under the couch until the next day, and she'll actively avoid us if she tries to go out for food and water. The first few times she did it, I brought her over to show her that pooping on the bed was wrong, but I don't know if it left the right impression. I can almost guarantee that this ...


11

If the idea of cleaning up after a pet disgusts you, then for the sake of the cat, please don't get one. It's not fair to the cat, and it's like saying "I'd love to have a kid, but I don't want to ever change its diaper." LITERALLY. It's EXACTLY like that. Certain responsibilities go with having any kind of pet or anything else that you have to care for, and ...


10

A couple of causes include: Dehydration. If your dog isn't getting enough water, then he may resort to the urine as a means of hydration. Make sure lots of water is available to him, perhaps even put out extra dishes in places where he may tend to do this act. Urinary tract infection. You can't really diagnose this, you'd need to bring him to see the vet. ...


10

Rather than trying to change behavior I use a top entry litter box like the one from Clever cat. This goes a long way to prevent litter from getting outside of the box. They also make mats that catch it outside of the box.


10

I covered the question a bit more broadly since the general problem may be of interest. Using the bed (or other furniture) is basically a subset. At any rate, by the three major trainable species: Cats Inappropriate Litter box quality is low, in other words it's not very clean Litter type may bother the cat, some may not like clay, etc. Urinary infection ...


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