26

TLDR: Not really. While the risk is low - COVID-19 seems to be fairly indiscriminate, with documented cases of dogs, cats, zoo otters and farmed minks getting it. Most corona virus (There's a whole family of similar viruses like SARS and MERS) outbreaks are pretty certainly zoonotic (they come from animals in the first place), so extra caution is a good idea....


19

Cats are extremely territorial animals. Most of the fights break out when territory is contested. Once territory is established, they no longer fight. Cats doing small excursions to other's territory leave quickly if enemy is sighted. For example, my cat has territorial dispute with one other cat over next garden. Our garden is obviously my cat's so a fight ...


6

Advice from the UK government is similar to that of the CDC mentioned by Journeyman Geek (emphasis mine): If you, or a member of your household, have symptoms of coronavirus (COVID-19) you should self-isolate for 10 days. If you’re self-isolating you should make alternative arrangements to take care of your animal’s welfare. You should ask for support from ...


4

There are two possible scenarios: Not everyone in your household is infected with COVID. In this case the cats could serve as vectors for the virus to spread to other members of your family so you should avoid contact with them and have other members of your family treat them as infected just in case. This means always wearing a mask around your cat or when ...


4

Too long for a comment, so an answer that might help future readers. How old are the fish? What sex? Sometimes pushing about is male fish trying to squeeze eggs out of female fish. In my experience, female goldfish get eggs round about 3 years of age. Males get breeding tubercles about 1 year. Sometimes biting and pushing just fish defending territory, ...


3

I would mostly worry about the diseases and death of your cat. If you feel that it is necessary, then call animal control to pick up the other cat (if it isn't yours). If you know the owner of the other cat, then explain to them that their cat is attacking yours and ask them to restrain it. If you don't know the owner of the other cat, then just go ahead and ...


3

It seems known, that infected cats could respond in different ways, like this (old) scientific paper states: Clinical and immunologic aspects of FeLV-induced immunosuppression G K Ogilvie et al. Vet Microbiol. 1988 Jul. Cats exposed to the feline leukemia virus (FeLV) may mount an effective immune response and eliminate the virus, develop a non-viremic, ...


2

This answer is part of Pets Spring Cleaning Campaign. This question is old, but this answer will still help people with the same problem. This is the comment of the original poster converted to an answer so that future users can find it easier. I wasn't overreacting. I went to another vet and ran blood tests, all parameters were normal; also, did x-rays I ...


2

Popping the tick does not more damage then the bite itself has done. But different as the other answers say, you should be worried about tick bites in general. Lyme Borreliosis Disease It is caused by a bacterium transmitted by minimum 4 different kinds of ticks. In some US states around 50% of ticks can be infected with them. They infect humans, dogs, ...


1

Maybe. I think it's only for you to discern. How old is the eldest person the cat, or those around it, will come into contact within the next 14 days? If you, your wife, and everyone else is well under 65 years old, you are safe (statistically, nothing is 100%) to be with your cat. This doesn't preclude your cat carrying the disease and infecting others in ...


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