22

Depending on the size and temperature limitations of the species, there are several ways approved by the American Veterinary Medical Association. One-step process of immersions (intentional overdose via immersion) in easily obtained (for hobbyist) solution includes: Eugenol (clove oil). Ethanol. Carbon dioxide saturated water, for most fish. It is ...


15

First of all, don't release them into the environment without checking with your local authorities whether it's okay to do so. Chances are that the captive crickets you have bought are not local to your area. The introduction of non-native animals to an environment unused to them can disrupt the local wildlife by introducing new predators, spreading disease ...


15

You are trying to balance the cat's pain on the one hand versus your sister's distress if this happens before she can get there. You can talk with your sister to gauge the latter, but you can't ask the cat how much pain she's in, nor ask her for an opinion. While it's impossible to judge these things over the Internet (and I am not a vet), you seem to be ...


13

Cats like humans, can survive a lot of injuries even if they appear to be lethal. You should take your pet to the vet for any type of euthanasia. The most humane way to euthanize a cat is through lethal injection, which should only be done by a veterinarian. Should I put her in the car and drive 30 minutes to the vet? Sounds like a lot of suffering. What ...


12

This is a difficult time, and taking your loved one to a vet for their last moments with you just does not seem like the right thing to do. When faced with a similar situation we found that there were two vets who do home visits in our area, with euthanasia included in their services. One specialized in hospice care. In our case, what had been a slowly ...


11

This is probably the most difficult decision anyone with a pet can make. In general, while the cat is still eating and drinking and not showing any signs of pain, I'd suggest holding off, particularly since your sister will be back in a week. In the meantime, you certainly want to keep your sister updated by talking to her every day. If you can video chat ...


11

If your concern is regarding the IV causing your dog pain, anyone being stuck with an IV can be caused pain. IVs are commonly used in many procedures (not necessarily euthanasia and not just for dogs) and they can make anyone uncomfortable. A dog will lick due to unfamiliarity, so it might have been bothered by the IV, but if a dog is in severe pain (for ...


11

From what I hear, it's typical for a cat with kidney disease to have their health go critical very suddenly, and when that happens, then it is definitely time. With a human, you could put them on dialysis, or give them a kidney transplant, but these are not available for cats, nor do I think they would be very good treatment options for them if we could do ...


8

This is going to be an opinion question and/or judgment call, but I'll suggest a basic principle: Quality Of Life. If the animal can be made reasonably comfortable and content, extending its life may be worthwhile. But if that extension inolves surgery or something else significantly unpleasant, you need to consider whether, from their point of view, they'...


6

I've had two cats who ultimately died because of kidney disease. In both cases, the cats let me know and the final drop-off was pretty fast. Definitely consult your vet, but it sounds like your cat's quality of life is still good. A 6-pound cat will eat less than a 12-pound cat. There are ways to get more calories into your cat even if she doesn't eat ...


6

Please take your cat to the vet and express your concerns. Ask the vet directly how your cat feels on a day-to-day basis. Is she in pain? Is she uncomfortable? Is her mental state affected? What should you look for to identify pain and altered mental status? These answers should help you determine when euthanasia is the right time. Additionally, there may ...


6

There are no humane options for you to put your dog to sleep. If done incorrectly, you could cause tremendous pain and suffering. Veterinarians are trained to humanely euthanize animals, and have the expertise to know when, how, and why euthanasia may be a reasonable option.


6

Inert gas asphyxiation may be effectively painless, and certainly more humane than death by extreme temperature. Here is an article describing a study done on the effects of nitrogen gas on kittens and puppies. Nitrogen can be purchased in canisters, and any airtight container with a relief valve will work; simply cycle the air out of the container until ...


4

I've worked with an animal rescue charity and seen cats who are in incredibly bad shape (think crushed hind legs, shattered pelvis, half skull caved in) and they have gone on to live amazing happy lives. Just don't do it. Seek advice from a vet every time


4

This is a difficult one to call. It's always a hard decision to make but I try and make sure that I've done everything I can to help before making a final decision. Here's my list: Water Quality Make sure your water is as good as it can be. No ammonia, no nitrite and nitrates probably lower than about 40ppm. Make sure you're keeping up with your maintenance. ...


4

If you are not trained for such diagnosis and the pet is not your property then it is not your place to make the decision or to take action. In the US, the best course of action is to contact your local animal control and alert them to the suffering creature. If you do not have that information then you can call 911 and they will send out the appropriate ...


4

Honestly, with cats it can be pretty hard to tell if they are in pain. It sounds to me like your cat is in pain. Here is a list of some (but by no means all) signs your cat is in pain: Cats don't typically groan or meow from ambient pain. Eating less than normal. Sleeping more than normal. Not interested in things that normally interest it, like play. ...


3

Sorry for posting on such an old topic, but I cannot agree with the accepted solution - so, for the future: Causing the fish suffocation or chemical burns is not humane, unless for you it means "clean" rather than "painless" - be sure you understand your own motivations. Shots and blunt force trauma to the head are also approved in the AVMA Euthanasia ...


3

The process might be irrelevant due to the brain size/incapacity to feel pain as pointed out in @MSU_Bulldog's answer. Since precise cutting with a sharp blade into the brain is not an option as it is for fish, there remains the option to introduce brain/nervous system death through cold. That might have led to the idea that just any process of freezing ...


3

I think that freezing the shrimp would be the least painful. Put it in a bag of water, then refrigerate for about an hour, then freeze overnight. And honestly some say that just putting it in a bag and stomping it or hitting it against the wall is a quick and painless way to euthanize the shrimp. I know stomping sounds horrible, but it is quick. Here is ...


3

I'm not aware of anything in particular about a cat with a heart condition that would make it more difficult to euthanize them. Generally, when the two injection method is used, the first injection should be sedation. If the pet is not sedated, the second injection should not be used until profound sedation occurs (usually they'll try to give more of the ...


3

I don't know if the smell you describe is an indication for or against euthanasia. I assume that it is a very serious symptom and indicates tissue death, but I suspect that no one could say much beyond that without knowing the specific medical details of your dog's case. It seems that her condition has deteriorated quickly since you contacted the vet to ...


3

This is a hard problem. I have been there several times. My advice is to let your cat live for as long as it does have a quality life, and I think it is a good thing to be prepared to take the decision of letting your cat go when the time comes. But for as long as your cat does eat, drink and function normally, it is best to let her live until she starts to ...


3

This could be a little off-topic, but maybe your cat has still some months to live, so please read my story :) We've been there two years ago. The cat was on renal veterinary food already, but suddenly began to eat less. We did the blood test and as our vet suspected it was due to the rising levels of creatinine which is the symptom of the kidneys' problems....


3

The best thing to do is see what her quality of life is, and by the sounds of it, it is still good and happy, as long as she is pain free let her have some more time, this way you can prepare for the end as well as letting her have a nice end.


3

I am so sorry you and your cat are in this difficult time. I know how heart-wrenching it can be. As you know it is difficult to tell when cats are in pain let alone how much pain. If the bigger question you are asking is “how do i know when my friend’s suffering is so great it should be ended” I use the following as a guide: 1) Can you see that their ...


2

I was with my daughter when she had to put her Pitt Bull, Bently, down at home by a vet. It was extremely fast, and appeared to be very humane and painless. Bentley was in her lap, and both of us talking to her, and petting her while she received the medication. . . Best way I can see to get them out of the pain of illness and to a better place. We miss her ...


2

Watching my dog struggle in my arms after the vet administered the drug to put him to sleep was horrifying as he went into spasms trying to breath and trying to wriggle out of my arms. The vet had already administered something to calm him down because he had always hated being in the vet's office. Talk to your vet about what to expect before you decide to ...


2

The vet won't (probably) let you do everything as you aren't licensed and could cause pain+ suffering by mistake. But they may agree to let you press the plunger once they've set it up properly, if you explain why it matters to you. Doing it at home is likely to be considered to cause extra risk of suffering though (whether it actually did or didn't).


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