12

Yes, these parasitic mites can be a vector for illness because they're effectively feeding on your snake. They're white when young, but will turn dark once they feed and would become easier to see, but they'll also be irritating the snake quite a bit. In the linked article there is some information on treatment, which is basically to bathe the snake and, ...


11

If your food is giving your dog the complete nutrition they need, and they don't have anything else wrong with them, it can be either from boredom, from some sort of stomach upset (which is rare), or part of a range of compulsive behaviours (excessive grooming, licking, etc), or they just might like the taste of the dirt for whatever reason, usually due to ...


10

John is right, your snake has mites. They're pretty similar in reptiles as fleas are in dogs and cats. Unfortunately the best way to deal with mites is to never get them at all because of the difficulty in getting rid of them. Mites will take refuge in the snake's scales, and pretty much every chemical that would kill the mites is harmful to reptiles as well....


10

The only answer is to TAKE IT TO THE VET RIGHT NOW. This sounds dangerous so you need to GO TO THE VET NOW. Nobody on the internet can tell you for sure what is wrong. A vet needs to examine your cat to treat it GO TO THE VET. Your cats life is in your hands, so please, TAKE IT TO THE VET.


9

The short answer is no, although dogs and humans can get lice, there are many different kinds that are specialized for different species; even within species there can be specific lice that are not transferable between areas (for example, there are several different types of lice that specifically inhabit different parts of the human body - the head OR pubic ...


8

We have a lot of ticks in the South-West Finland and so I have been removing ticks from our dogs on regular basis every spring. We never seem to treat the dogs with tick repellent early enough. To remove ticks I have used normal tweezers, special "tick-tweezers", bare fingernails and a tick lasso. So far the absolutely best device for removing ticks has ...


8

Yes, there are general signs related to their stool as you noted, including diarrhea, blood, or constipation. For other signs, you should be looking for: Unexplained weight loss Vomiting Coughing and other breathing difficulties In general, though, being able to see them poop (or the outcome of it) is the most effective way to detect the presence of ...


8

Looks like a damselfly larvae to me, which isn't actually a parasite. It is, however, carnivorous... If your fish were larger, this larvae could have turned into food for them, but not in this case as you have small fish. So, as it is they can be dangerous to your fish and shrimp, so best to make sure you get them out of the tanks as soon you find them. ...


7

Oh yes, ticks are quite an issue for dogs. Some diseases that may be transmitted by ticks include: Canine babesiois Rocky mountain spotted fever Canine monocytic ehrlichiosis Cyclic thrombocytopenia Granulocytic anaplasmosis Lyme disease American canine hepatozoonosis Canine hepatozoonosis Tick paralysis Many of these associated issues may also effect ...


6

I found a stray puppy some months back at the gate to my home and she was covered with fleas and cuts. She kept biting herself and would also wimper in pain. You could see the fleas in her fur, they were huge. First, I got a small empty aerosol bottle with a spray nozzle and bought a small bag of flea powder (the generic stuff you can get at any store, ...


6

Precious Tijesunimi has some organic remedies in their answer, if appropriate these should be seriously considered. I have also heard of other organic options. For a non-organic solution, there are a few options that are sold for cats and dogs that can also be used on Rabbits. Use extreme caution when choosing one of these methods, some can be fatal to ...


6

The short answer to that question is yes. The mite to worry about is the Cheyletiella parasitivorax which is most commonly found on rabbits, dogs, cats, us... however, it's not limited to that group, they can also be found on cavies. So, treating your rescue and, at the very least, keeping him away from the rabbits until the treatment is finished would be ...


6

You need to ask your vet about the treatment of this. Most of us here are common pet owners, so all I can do is give you some advice. Antibiotics are only an option if your cat has a bacterial infection. And as far as I can see, this might not be the case in your cat. Vets do often give steroids to treat pancreatitis in cats. Ask your vet about this to find ...


5

No, there is not a strictly internal/oral medication that can be used to treat maggots living in a live dog. The condition is called fly strike or Myiasis it can be fatal if untreated, there has been some success orally with Ivermectin in treating cattle, but there is some indication that dying larvae excrete toxins that can be fatal so close monitoring of ...


5

According the Blackwell's Five-Minute Veterinary Consult: Canine and Feline the process is to grasp the tick as close to the skin as possible with tweezers and gently pull free. So, I would wear disposable gloves and using blunt-tipped tweezers (to protect the skin of the dog), gently grasp the tick body and gently pull in the opposite direction of the ...


5

It appears as though flea and tick treatment is effective on dogs with all hair types, despite the differences in oil production, as long as the product is applied correctly. From Bioactivation in Fleas: [Flea and Tick removal] products move through the oily coating of the dog or cat’s hair and skin in exactly the same way in long and short-haired breeds....


4

Diatomaceous Earth claims say that it works on fleas/mites by microscopically abrading (cutting) their exoskeleton, essentially drying them out. Currently, there is no data on the amount of time is necessary for an organism to be exposed to DE before it has effectively "killed" the organism. However, your dog shouldn't be exposed to DE for more than 12 hours ...


4

I saw this post resurrected and I want to put in a resource I found. Mite Eradication 101: Permethrin Permethrin comes in many forms - Provent-A-Mite (PAM), NIX/RID head lice treatment, Permethrin-10 from a livestock supply store, etc. Once mixed with water its half life is 30 days if kept out of direct sunlight. PAM has several advantages. It has been ...


4

I don't know whether this is the case for all species of worm infection and I rather doubt that it is, but at least some worms can be seen by examining the cat's anus. Don't worry, nothing invasive, just lift the tail out of the way and have a look. You can sometimes see small white worms there. I have seen this in a few of my cats over the years and ...


4

You will ideally want to use a product containing Selamectin (UK brand name Stronghold - manufactured by Pfizer ETA: Revolution as suggested by James appears to be the US brand name) or Imidaclopromide (UK brand name Advantage - manufactured by Bayer) as these are effective against a number of parasites including fleas. Most over the counter "spot on" ...


4

Side note: Im in the woods with my 8 year old Yella Lab every morning at sunup for an hour. We used to use one of those topical tick/flea oils, but switched to Trifexis about 5 years ago, because he's a swimmer. Tick checks daily. With the oils, I pulled a little more than 2 ticks a week off him. Since the switch, it's less than half that. A few times ...


4

This can be a lengthy process, here are the steps you and your veterinarian need to take. 1) Shave the area around the wound, it needs to breathe and be kept clean, having all that hair in the area will only make things worse. 2) Capstar is a good medication for maggots, it needs to be given rectally and not orally. Injectable ivermectin can work as well ...


4

This sounds a lot like how wolves and other wild canids build a den While this is 'natural' behaviour - you're almost certainly going to be better off setting up a dedicated, indoor area. Puppies tend to get in trouble, they're at risk from outdoor critters - both insects and other, larger threats and it gives them better opportunities to socialise with ...


3

There do not appear to be any natural non-mosquito vectors of Heartworm (Dirofilaria immitis). In fact it appears there are only about 60 species of mosquito that can be a vector for the parasitic roundworm, this is out of about 3,500 known species of mosquito grouped into 41 genera. Summary The Wikipedia article was mostly used as reference for the ...


3

When considering treatments for elderly animals, I usually go through a risk assessment to pick the best option. What are the risks/hazards to each action I can take? What is the likelihood of each risk/hazard? For this situation, you can either give the heartworm preventative or not give the heartworm preventative. Administering the Preventative If you ...


3

Manual removal is best, because it also allows you to clean/disinfect the wounds with isopropyl alcohol (or other disinfectant). If she doesn't sit still for you to remove all of the ticks at once, you can try just pulling off one or two at a time, then giving her a break (petting her, giving her treats, playing a game, etc) before pulling off another tick ...


3

Dogs and cats have a wide variety of flea management options available, but most flea treatments for ferrets are off-label. In additional to vacuuming and treating the environment, you can try: Food-grade diatomaceous earth. Enzymatic products like Kleen Green, which are labeled as non-toxic. Serious flea problems generally require stronger measures, ...


3

So called "natural" remedies are not necessarily: more effective; or with less side effects. Diatomaceous earth and garlic, to whatever degree they do work, would have much worse effects on your dog than on the parasites in it. Dogs do not have cytochromes in their guts like we do, so garlic is not good for them (as it is for us) but actually bad for them. ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible