8

If you're able to contact the previous owner, they would probably be the best person to tell you when and if they need removed. There are stitches that dissolve over time, so they might not need to come out and that's why the previous owner forgot to mention it. But, I don't know of any way to tell whether or not they're the kind that dissolves. If you ...


7

From https://www.clarkforkvet.com/dr-chat-articles/2018/1/2/deciphering-the-current-neuter-debate "Osteoporosis, a common problem in women with lowering estrogen levels, has not been shown as an issue in neutered males or females, dogs or cats."


7

Do not feel guilty it's VERY good that you spayed her!! You've helped prevent so many bad things. At my work, although not very common to see intact females anymore, the ones we do see always have an issue! The common issues I see with intact females are cancer and pyometra (essentially uterus fills with pus to the extent it kills your dog unless spayed), ...


6

Even if your cat is infected with FIP, the neutering is safe to do. I have had this done to a feral cat I had a couple of years ago (actually it was done at the same time as a tooth was extracted as a result of FIP). I cannot answer how safe it is to spay a female cat that has FIP, but I do not think the risk is significantly elevated in female cats. Cats ...


6

Short answer You can't tell, but a vet or shelter can (kind of). If the rabbit has a microchip, a phone call will likely identify the gender, and history of the rabbit. Without a microchip, if you can't find testicles assume it is a young rabbit (of either gender) or an unaltered adult female. Long Answer Rabbits are much like cats when trying to tell ...


5

It is generally a good idea to take a new cat to your veterinarian for a general health and wellness exam within a week or two of getting them. This ensures that if you later have a sudden illness, your vet is already familiar with your cat and has a baseline for what she looks like when she is well. During this initial exam, you should bring any records ...


3

The pattern of the redness clearly indicates at least strong skin irritation, if not infection. Your dog clearly indicates that he's in pain, so the pain is rather severe, too. (Dogs usually hide mild pain and only show symptoms if the pain is strong.) Please try contacting your usual vet by phone and explain the situation. Maybe they'll treat your dog as an ...


3

The only right answer if you are concerned is to have a veterinarian examine her. That being said, while she is still healing a week after surgery, in all likelihood she is fine. You said the external sutures are intact, which is important. The vet will have placed internal sutures where her ovaries and uterus were, and there is a small risk that excessive ...


3

In 90% of cases the male baby bunnies will start fighting if they came to puberty. They can be very aggressive and use their sharp teeth to hurt skin, ears and ballbag of each other. In the last case the injured rabbit can bleed to death. Baby bunnies can be neutered before this point, so you avoid hurts and the need to separate them. If you wait until ...


3

TL:DR Baby rabbits are hard to tell the gender of. If you get two, there is a 50% chance you will have baby bunnies as your first clue that you did not get two the of the same gender. If you keep them separated that defeats the idea of them keeping each other company. The path of two baby rabbits is full of potential for unpleasantness. The simple answer ...


3

Pro Spaying: The opening phrase of the study "Effect of Spaying and Timing of Spaying on Survival of Dogs with Mammary Carcinoma" is the reason why most vets advice spaying female dogs: The risk of developing mammary gland tumors in dogs is significantly decreased by ovariohysterectomy at an early age. It furthermore states: Signalment, spay status ...


3

You can lower the chances of a dog jumping by providing any kind of step or ramp. Use sturdy cardboard boxes, foot rests, bottle crates or whatever you can find that won't slip over the floor has a non-slip surface and won't give under the dog's wheight.


3

Based on the image provided, this is not the normal healing process. It looks as though your dog has been licking excessively at the incision and flank, or has been too active after the surgery. However it is hard to tell exactly what is going on just based on a photo. The sutures themselves take weeks to months to dissolve, depending on the suture type. It ...


2

Your question is fairly complex. We have several existing posts that talk about some of the specific issues you will face. For the most part I will include links to our existing posts for more detail. The question does not indicate the current age or living arrangements of the 4 bunnies. Even if you want to have baby bunnies it is important that you keep ...


2

Ingesting and injecting is totally different, you are right. For example, potassium chloride is a compound that is used as table salt substitute (though it is often mixed with normal table salt to hide its unnatural bitter flavor and metallic aftertaste), but its oral toxicity is similar to the toxicity of normal table salt, which is low. It is also one of ...


2

To be honest, this does look somewhat worrying. The rest of the incision healed very well, but the dark dot near the bruising could be a spot that didn't heal properly. In my oppinion, you don't need to rush to an emergency vet, unless one of the following occurs: Your dog is lethargic, sleeping all the time and avoiding physical activities. Your dog eats ...


1

Sorry but the picture quality is too bad to see what's going on, but the wound does not look reopened. If the black substance is a scab, it's ok for the 7th day. However, if the skin itself is turning blue or black, your vet needs to have a look again. The red edge of the incision looks slightly inflamed, which is no reason to panic. If the red spreads out, ...


1

There are a few things that this could be really. 1, Establishing himself in the pack, mounting and humping are often a way of displaying dominance to other dogs, regardless of size. 2, The nibbling could be play and trying to engage the other dog in to playing with them. Neutering could solve the problem, however one risk of this is that the dog could ...


1

You have posted the question and the answer so it is a bit hard to help you. The thing you might try is to feed the kittens their favorite food before they go to the mother for milk. The thing you cannot do is to separate the kittens and the mother, separating them by force will create problems. Kittens and cats need to have a fixed routine: play-eat-...


1

Welcome to the pets stack exchange. I'm sorry to hear about your dog but you are right in thinking that there is more to spaying than just stopping their reproductive capacities. Advantages: No seasons - No blood discharge to clean up No ovarian cancer - No ovaries, no cancer. Doesn’t Contribute to Pet Overpopulation – There are already so many unwanted ...


1

Do not put the female and male together, see this answer for more detail when the male mounts the female she will release eggs, and get pregnant. The chance of this are very high, near 100% There are hormone changes after the surgery, it is best to wait 30 days after the surgery before introducing the rabbits to each other. The hormone change with spay/...


1

Here's my counter arguments, for what it is worth: Regarding your thoughts on points one and three. Yes, there can be problems associated with spaying. These sorts of complications are also fairly uncommon. Spaying is a very common, routine procedure. Meanwhile, there are also many health risks associated with not spaying the animal. Such as pyometra (which ...


1

Stopping a dog from jumping and running is always going to be hard to do. So just stop her as much as you can. Ive seen people say 1-2 weels but to be safe I would recommend not until the stitches are removed only then can you 100% guarantee the incision has healed. This will make sure nothing serious can happen.


1

I can't comment or I would put this as a comment Copied from http://www.rabbitsonline.net/showthread.php?t=58444 where someone asked about keeping breeding bucks together. "Two things you can count on in rabbits is that they must have a social order, which includes boundaries, and that they can be fierce about establishing and defending it. Your rabbit'...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible