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9

If you're able to contact the previous owner, they would probably be the best person to tell you when and if they need removed. There are stitches that dissolve over time, so they might not need to come out and that's why the previous owner forgot to mention it. But, I don't know of any way to tell whether or not they're the kind that dissolves. If you ...


9

Colorado State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital has a handout on Treatment options for cranial cruciate ligament injury/disease of the dog knee which states: There is ample evidence that perioperative rehabilitation therapy by a trained rehabilitation practitioner can advance and hasten the recovery from surgery. There is little/no evidence to ...


8

There are a few options. Usually when the veternarian supplies cones, they are hard plastic and annoying to the cat because they interrupt peripheral vision and hearing, as well as eating and drinking. There are soft cones available that some pets find more tolerable, Trimline is one manufacturer. These cones can be worn in the traditional "up around the ...


7

In addition to Skippy's excellent information, one thing I've noticed is that there's a much higher likelihood of hormonal issues with later-desexed animals. If the cat or dog is mature when the operation happens, their hormonal balance tends to "freeze" at the point where they were spayed or neutered. I've seen this lead to compulsive over-eating, ...


7

I have a large (strong) grown up cat, who've had a major operation on his hind quarters, and needed a hard plastic cone to keep him from biting the stitches. To keep him from pulling the cone off, I tied a long ribbon (actually a bandage) through the loops in the cone, once around his neck, crossing down on his chest - behind the front legs - and crossing ...


7

Do not feel guilty it's VERY good that you spayed her!! You've helped prevent so many bad things. At my work, although not very common to see intact females anymore, the ones we do see always have an issue! The common issues I see with intact females are cancer and pyometra (essentially uterus fills with pus to the extent it kills your dog unless spayed), ...


7

It is best if your cat avoids licking the wound for a couple of weeks as it heals. The chance for the incision to be infected is not large, but it is best to be sure it does not happen. So you need to put the cone back on and a little tighter this time; where I live the vets do often avoid putting on a cone, but do send the cone home with the cat in case it ...


7

Most of this is going to come from what I remember from a University assignment a decade ago. There is scientific evidence suggests that a cats purr can aid healing. A cat’s purr frequency is between 25 & 150 Hertz. google the low end is a similar frequency to the one that medical professionals use in vibrational therapies to promote tissue regeneration....


6

Two weeks seems like a long time, but that's actually how long it takes to heal. Actually, it's technically a bit longer, because they take the stitches out before it's fully healed so that the body doesn't begin to react to the stitches. By my estimate, you will probably notice after the first week that it looks healed. But I would still caution you to be ...


5

It is generally a good idea to take a new cat to your veterinarian for a general health and wellness exam within a week or two of getting them. This ensures that if you later have a sudden illness, your vet is already familiar with your cat and has a baseline for what she looks like when she is well. During this initial exam, you should bring any records ...


4

Your vet will be able to give you specific instructions for your situation, so please make sure you sit down with them and discuss any and all concerns you have about this surgery. I've never had a cat who needed intestinal surgery, but we did have a cat who had a hiatal hernia repaired (his stomach was moving into his esophagus), and later he had a gastric ...


4

Please remember to ask your vet your health related questions when you take her in. As for how to prevent your cat from eating strange objects, the most effective method is to simply keep things you know she's particularly attracted to, and things that would be particularly dangerous to her stored away and out of reach. You could even establish a room ...


4

The suggestions by littlekellilee are all very good ones and should reduce most problem urination. That said it sounds like he is "pissed off" and this is how he is relieving himself. Suggestions 1 & 2 are great for most problem urination ones but maybe not this situation (though they can only make the situation better- not worse). 3 Can help let him ...


4

Cats generally prefer to go in a litterbox. There's a few things you can try: 1) Get a larger litter box. Maybe he doesn't think the size is big enough and is finding it difficult to use because of the cone. A larger one may make it easier for him. 2) Get several litter boxes and put them around the house. It'll make it easier for him to see it and he ...


4

Self-answering what I've decided to do: Over the weekend I kept an eye on her, while letting her roam as usual during the day. The e-collar makes her a bit more clumsy, but otherwise she didn't get into any troubling situations and has been running and jumping about (despite my best efforts the first couple days) with no discomfort or injury. So, I feel ...


4

He's just grooming himself, when they wear the collar they can't reach anything so once it comes off it's go time! No concerns as long as the incision is healing nicely :)


4

I can't speak for the USA but in the UK a key factor is the pet's weight, another is its age. No pet is accepted as a donor if it weighs less than a critical value. For example a dog must be over 25kg, irrespective of breed. For more details, many of which will be useful in the US, look at this.


4

This is about appearance, to make them look tougher which is why it's generally done with certain breeds. Beyond that, there's no benefit to the dog, the "toughness" appearance is a human aesthetic only and many are now starting to back away from it. Edit based on commentary... There is a possible legitimate benefit with respect reducing the risk of a yeast ...


4

A few things before I answer the question: This video is not a good example of how you should keep or handle your snakes. Venomous snakes are unforgiving to keep. As much experience as you might have, a single moment of inattentiveness could kill you. That said, let's go on with your question. What gets people attention regarding the video is that the ...


4

Where i live bloodwork is not done before surgery unless there is a medical condition that needs to be confirmed or excluded that might affect the outcome of the surgery. Link: http://www.pethealthnetwork.com/dog-health/dog-checkups-preventive-care/why-does-my-dog-need-blood-work-anesthesia Bloodwork will not show low oxygen and if it does it is just a ...


3

I too had the problem of my cat Fonzie (now nicknamed "Houdini") pushing the cone off his little head. What I did works great I used a halter and attached two loops of the cone to the halter on his back and the one front loop to the part where the halter sits on his chest. It is a halter one would use with a leash on to take the cat for a walk. He isn't ...


3

You can : doggie intelligence test doggie agility / doggie indoor agility teach the dog a new trick doggie daycare service in your area find the treat game ; and other games take your dog for a walk take your dog to a dog-friendly restraunt and eat at the patio etc


3

We ended up shopping at Petsmart and bought a Remedy+Recovery brand E-Collar, medium, pink. My wife bought it, so I don't know how much it cost. It was way better for Peanut than the large hard plastic white cone that was both too large and too heavy. The E-Collar fit just right, and came to the end of her snout. After a couple days with it, she was ...


3

When our dog was spayed, our vet recommended using a baby / toddler onsie. We picked one up from a used clothing store for maybe $3 and it worked great. Just make sure to take it off before they go to the bathroom.


3

My brother's cat did this surgery a month ago. Now she is OK but after surgery she went home and starts playing so the hurt opens again and she was almost about dying in the second surgery. She got an infection and doctors decided to cut more the intestine. The better you can do and keep you cat closed in a small area, in order not to be allowed to move ...


3

My research suggests that it could be possible, but the prognosis depends on how soon have the eggs been removed from the platy fish after it died. Platies are fish from the genus Xiphophorus of the family Poeciliidae. Xiphophorus genus contains 28 recognized species; all of them are called either platies or swordtails, and this distinction depends on ...


2

For cats and dogs in Germany: Animals can give blood in any animal clinic and at most vets, the conditions are: General: up to date with vaccinations no worms checked for ticks no animals that take certain medication no animals from southern countries no animals that have been pregnant no animals that have received a blood donation Dog: Age between 1 ...


2

For cats and dogs in Norway to donate blood the criteria are: Cats Age 1-6 years old (must have started donating blood before the age of 4 years old). At least 5 kg body mass, but not overweight. Healthy and not using any medication (deworming and medication against parasites is OK). Preferably indoor cats only. Not have antibodies against FIP/FIV. Not ...


2

OP here, following up after two years. We opted for starting with a leg brace, which seemed to be more of a discomfort to our dog than a help. After trying that solution for about a month, we decided to just keep her calm and see how much rest could do for her. Surprisingly, she's made almost a full recovery. For the first six months, we limited her ...


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