32

Whatever your general opinions on free-roaming cats may be, allowing your cat to hunt in a bird sanctuary definitely sounds like a highly irresponsible thing to do. If you'd rather not lock your cat entirely indoors, one option to consider would be to build a secure outdoor enclosure for your cat. Unlike Allison C, I wouldn't rely on just a fence, no ...


30

Distraction, via food, voice or otherwise, is usually a good way of managing in the short term but in my personal view it can take quite some time before the dog gets the connection if you're using distraction alone and relying on things to happen (i.e. whenever a child happens to pass by). Another short term technique to can be of help is finding an ...


23

This answer is not correct. If you have a dominance problem with the dog (which MANY people do) letting the dog win will just exacerbate the aggression displayed by your dog. The act of playing is a release of energy and aggression, so I don't agree that you need to let the dog win in all circumstances. Personally I don't let my dog win at tug-of-war, and ...


22

I would really urge you to see a professional dog trainer that you trust, with experience with aggressive dogs, and have him assess your dogs and help you out. But after reading a bit more detail about your situation here than what you gave in another question on why he lunges at children, I'll take a guess at your dog's previous history, which might go ...


18

For male dogs, it doesn't seem to matter. Some behaviours will respond to castration, others won't, no matter the age of the dog: Castration was most effective in altering objectionable urine making, mounting, and roaming. With various types of aggressive behavior, including aggression toward human family members, castration may be effective in decreasing ...


18

Cats are just like dogs in that they need a lot of exercise. More importantly, they also share the same instinct to kill, except to a much greater degree. I would say that your cat needs one or both of these things to happen: More exercise (buy some interactive toys) Something to "kill" after exercising (and no, don't buy mice just so it can kill them) ...


18

The best situation for any domestic cat is to live indoors; it would have been an easier transition when he was younger, but it can still be done, if you're willing to endure a period of "misery" for both yourselves and for him as you retrain him. A new location may very well aid in this reconditioning. If you're neither willing nor able to retrain him as ...


15

So, cats can be fairly vocal animals and many of their vocalizations have some meaning with respect to how they may respond. The ones that indicate a level of aggression include: Growl, which is usually low-pitched, harsher, and short in duration and mouth is open. Is usually an antagonistic sound. Hiss, which is usually open-mouthed and has visible teeth. ...


14

As an FYI before reading, I've cited a source towards the end of this post for most of the information you'll find in it. Typically when two dogs are playing rough, it's better to let them figure things out. If your male dog seems to be biting down pretty hard on the female dog's scruff/neck area, and she doesn't seem to mind or still exhibits classic play ...


13

Most locations have leash laws that apply to all domestic animals, in most areas they are only enforced on dogs. In an area with a bird sanctuary, it may very well be applied to cats as well. The risks of moving you cat near a bird sanctuary, may not be just to the local birds. Check the local laws and their enforcement, fines and loss of your cat are ...


12

Generally, when introducing mature cats to a each other, it's a good idea to put them in adjoining rooms, where they can sniff and hear each other from under the door. It gives them a chance to become familiar with each other, without feeling threatened. The door would then be opened and they would be allowed to be in the same room, but under supervision. ...


12

Tug as Play vs. Tug-Toy as Resource Unless you are dealing with a dog with resource-guarding or bite-inhibition issues, healthy play between dogs is reciprocal. When playing with humans, the play should also be reciprocal, but the human should maintain some control over when the game starts and stops. The ASPCA has a fairly thorough overview of tug, but ...


11

Add a second litter box to the house. It is not unusual for any animal to get overly protective of 'their' litter box. I have seen this behavior in both cats and rabbits. It is generally solved by adding a second litter box some distance from the first. While the more aggressive pet might want to protect both boxes, it is logistically difficult to do ...


11

Get a collar with a bell. I'm going to say that the best and easiest way to solve this problem is to get a collar and put a small bell on it. The bell will provide enough warning that the vast majority of birds will have enough warning to escape. Yes, you say that you have difficulty keeping a collar on your cat. I admit I don't quite understand this -- ...


10

For performance dogs we like to wait until 18 months on average. The point is to wait for them to really be done growing. Removing hormones before that point can cause bones and muscle to grow differently than they would have otherwise. Dogs fixed early tend to be taller and less filled out than they would have been otherwise. However if it is a non - ...


10

So, first of all, I don't think it's anger. Behaviors like this are often a result of earlier "play" with the dog that was a little more physical than appropriate and so the dog learns that biting is a part of play. I can't say, for sure, if this is your case, but it's a common cause. Net effect, this may be a sign that the dog misses you and wants to play. ...


9

In games, your cat is learning skills that he will use throughout his life. When he accidentally corners himself, it's scary, and he reacts out of fear (by hissing). As his guardian/playmate, if you respect his hiss and back off until he can uncorner himself and show interest in playing again, then he will learn that his verbal warning is effective. In the ...


9

It could be a multitude of things. Lack of exercise plays a big role in how your dog acts. If they have a lot of unused energy, they're more likely to act up. Giving him treats or praise will encourage the behavior you're trying to prevent. You want to refrain from treats or praise until he's doing what you want him to do. In the mean time, make it clear ...


9

First, I'd suggest taking a look at the answers to these questions: How can I encourage my kitten to leave my adult cat alone? Can't tell if cats are playing with or hunting each other My older cat is very aggressive towards my 6 week old kitten How to get cats to coexist in peace? Your new kitten is very young (ideally they shouldn't leave their ...


9

I have to strongly suggest taking these fish back to the store. I've kept discus for many years and bred discus in the past for roughly a decade. I can say with almost complete certainty that these fish are not going to survive and certainly are not going to achieve anything close to their potential in size and vibrancy. Juvenile discus are handedly the ...


8

I'm not fond of kittens and tend to get rescue kitties who are adults, so my advice is going to be based on my experience of mature, adult cats. I'm not sure if their young age would affect anything here, but I just wanted to point that out ahead of time. Your cats may have different play drives. The older cat wants to end the play session (thus, the ...


8

For some reason, your kitty has been conditioned to think sneezing is a bad thing. Your cat thinks something bad will happen to him when he hears a sneeze. In his past, a sneeze or a sound similar to a sneeze, could have conditioned him in this way. You need to reconditioned him. To do this, you will need to keep his favorite treats throughout the house....


8

He's clearly a bit freaked out but I would say that he'll almost certainly get over it and you don't need to worry. My advice would be to be as non-threatening as possible, be affectionate and give him treats but as much as you can let him come to you. If he wants to hide let him hide because that will be making him feel safe. Also, I know this is easier ...


8

Why does this happen? This is fairly common and is termed Non-Recognition Aggression, cats rely on scent to recognize each other. Her visit to the hospital has changed her scent to the point where her brother can no longer recognize. A few theories behind it are: The cat expressed his/her anal glands or is emitting pheromones associated with stress. The cat ...


8

I would encourage you to keep trying things, even if they don't seem to work or have not worked in the past. As others have suggested, try various things to make indoors more appealing, so he has less of an urge to venture outdoors. Play with him. A lot. No, even more than that. Give him an outlet for all that energy. If he's really food motivated, it ...


7

Aggression in a dog is usually not a natural behavior but an attitude and frame of mind within the dog that they learn as a potential way to deal with a situation that they find highly uncomfortable. When feeling uncomfortable with a situation a dog usually lets out a number of warning signs to let others know that they do not like the situation, such as ...


7

Should I Stop The Fight? Sometimes cats play fight, and a little squabbling is normal to establish territorial dominance. Signs of a serious cat fight that should be interrupted: Blood on one/both of the cats Growling (aggression), hissing (fear/aggression), or yowling (pain/fear) Puffed out fur (especially on the tail) indicates that the cat is trying to ...


7

A few key points to make sure that the situation and context are well understood: Aggression is not a problem that gets fixed. It is managed and you measure improvement over (long periods of) time Agression toward other dogs is called intra-specific aggression (dog-dog aggression, different from dog-human aggression) Such aggression can have basically two ...


7

I think it would be beneficial to have a cat behaviourist pay a visit, and observe the cat in your home, and observe how you interact with him. There are probably things that you're doing (without being aware of them) that exacerbate the problem. Your vet or local animal shelter can probably recommend someone. But I do have some suggestions that may help. ...


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