23

This answer is not correct. If you have a dominance problem with the dog (which MANY people do) letting the dog win will just exacerbate the aggression displayed by your dog. The act of playing is a release of energy and aggression, so I don't agree that you need to let the dog win in all circumstances. Personally I don't let my dog win at tug-of-war, and ...


14

Tug as Play vs. Tug-Toy as Resource Unless you are dealing with a dog with resource-guarding or bite-inhibition issues, healthy play between dogs is reciprocal. When playing with humans, the play should also be reciprocal, but the human should maintain some control over when the game starts and stops. The ASPCA has a fairly thorough overview of tug, but ...


10

It shouldn't pose a problem for cats and dogs living together to share the same water bowl(s). As they live together they have in any case a lot of opportunities to share potential diseases in many ways. The important point is that they should be able to chose not to share the same bowl. My two cats and my dog share 2 different water bowls, the cats have ...


10

I'm afraid to break it to you but I think the Chessie is the real problem. Dominance hierarchy theory has been comprehensively debunked, being based on studies of captive, unrelated wolves in zoos, which bears no resemblance to the familiar pack structure wolves adopt in the wild. There is also a big question mark over how much wolf behaviour can tell us ...


10

This is probably not a direct answer to your question, although I hope it will provide some elements. I try to first give some info about the "dominance theory", and then try to answer your question more precisely. Dominance The "dominance" theory is overused in the canine literature and, in fact quite misused. The theory derives from observations of ...


9

Things to remember/think about: You just got her from her usual environment. The binding phase where dogs learn to interact and live with humans is long over. It sounds like she had not much interactions with humans? 5 months is rather a teenager than a puppy. Prepare for a hard time measured in weeks/months, not in hours/days. Things to do: Stay calm. ...


8

I'm not fond of kittens and tend to get rescue kitties who are adults, so my advice is going to be based on my experience of mature, adult cats. I'm not sure if their young age would affect anything here, but I just wanted to point that out ahead of time. Your cats may have different play drives. The older cat wants to end the play session (thus, the ...


7

When a cat pees in a particular spot, it is trying to mark territory through the release of scent, not challenge your authority through the action of peeing. If you try to discipline the cat in any way, you are likely to confuse the cat (who will think you are disciplining her for peeing, not for peeing in an unapproved location). The best thing to do is ...


7

Yes, it sounds like you could have a little bit of a dominance issue. Unlike dogs, who tend to be all dominate or all submissive, cats tend to be dominate over certain things. For example: In a two cat household, one cat could be dominate over food, while the other is dominate over the litter box. In your case, it sounds like Chilli is dominate over ...


6

It is a sign of dominance. By mounting other dogs, your dog tries to assert it's dominance, literally being the "top dog" (source: psychologytoday.com). Also, there may remain some hormone activity after being neutered. I've personally known a young female dog who was neutered, but kept making "passes" at the housewife, whom she perceived as the ...


6

Cats do have a social pecking order when living in a group, but it's not anything you need to enforce. If Fearless starts picking fights with Booboo, make sure that there are escape routes through the house so that Booboo doesn't get cornered (this would start a huge fight since Booboo wouldn't have escape as an option). If there are any locations in your ...


6

I would not separate them, it sounds like they are forming a bond. Breaking a rabbits bond can be fatal. Rabbits often mount each other as a sign of dominance, gender does not matter when mounting for dominance. Rabbits will sometimes mount backwards and this should be discouraged as it can injury the rabbits neck. In any case you should discourage ...


6

First of all your bf needs to step up and take ownership. It is his dog and your house. Your bf should shut the door. Your bf should place the dog on the floor. You bf should not let the dog stare you down. He is telling the dog this is acceptable behavior. He should not defer discipline / training to you. You may need to get help with a ...


6

I'll let my answer be more food for thought than an outright answer, because you're already doing a few of the things I'd be trying, such as putting her off the furniture when she "claims" your boyfriend. I'll also agree with Frisbee. I think this dog displays more fearful tendencies than aggressive ones. Rolling over and peeing on herself strongly tells me ...


6

Separate them, quarantine the new cat in a limited area (one room, eg) and re-introduce gradually. There are good resources on the web for this, including at least one YouTube video series spanning several weeks and explaining what the cats' interactions and body language are saying about their progress in tolerating/trusting each other. Note that it may ...


6

While 4 litter boxes for three cats should in theory be sufficient, it may be beneficial to temporarily add some extra litter boxes. I suspect that Izze is avoiding the litter boxes because he is afraid of being ambushed; so an uncovered litter box that allows him to see his surroundings may be best. You might consider feeding Peaches in a separate room so ...


5

When and why is the (outdated) dominance theory (wrongly) used? First I'd like to clarify me opinion about the so-called "dominance theory". The starting point of this discussion is that the "dominance theory", as it is generally depicted, is an outdated concept. For more details see my other answers on the subject,here and here. The idea by itself, ...


5

I wouldn't worry about it since it's a case of a dog grooming another dog. If it was compulsively grooming itself, it could be a case of dry/irritated skin, allergies, or parasites among others. I think what probably happened is that sometime during their playing Dewey starting the behaviour and it just became a habit for whatever reason. It could be that ...


5

There are a lot of variables including age and breed of rooster. Ranges for cock to hen range from 1 to 8 and 1 to 20, these numbers are for successful fertilization. Having to many roosters to hens, can also cause harm to your hens as the roosters will try to make the same number of matings per day regardless of the number of hens, so each hen gets more ...


4

This is pretty typical in my experience. I have 2 cats and the older one is very jealous (I call him "Jealous Jack"). If the younger cat (Henry) is laying next to me, Jack will actually try to squeeze between us or annoy(biting, licking) Henry until Henry moves. I don't allow Jack to be a bully and usually just wrangle him into my opposite side and give him ...


4

Since you've said you recently moved, if there are no other medical issues involved, you've probably got a mix of stress and confusion causing the problem. As others have said, cats really don't like change. I'd suggest starting with a collection of small, disposable litter boxes around the house (this is temporary, to get the cat used to peeing where she ...


4

It's spring time, that means it's mating time for dogs. You say Brutus is not fixed, so his hormones make him somewhat more dominant and a lot more interested in finding a nice girl now. You should expect him to be more restless and less obedient for a few weeks. He may hump people or objects (which is an expression of his hormones in that case, not a sign ...


3

I can't give a definitive answer on the subject, there are so many things the dog might want to communicate. However, I can't resist to comment on the dominance idea. The idea that our dogs are trying to "assert their dominance" or higher their position in a "dominance hierarchy" is a myth that has been debunked many times. I don't want to repeat myself in ...


3

Generally speaking, dogs don't normally dwell on any one thing for very long. After they use the bathroom, they move onto something else. That is why, a lot of times, when people are referencing Dog training they say they have to be "caught in the act" otherwise it isn't effective. Once they have finished, they are finished and their mind goes elsewhere. If ...


3

After you clean the spot, you could feed your cat near that area. Cats are not going to pee in a place where they eat. That's probably why she is not using the kitchen as her litter-box. Speak to your cat.. when you notice her peeing outside the litter-box. Never shout but speak and sound disappointed, and gesture towards the litter-box (point and tap the ...


3

Hitting your fuzzy buddies isn't a good idea. Even a gentle tap is a bad idea. It can make them fear you, even if it is a soft tap on the back. They are more likely to become more aggressive. Time out in the carrier and scuffing them and gently dragging them across the floor is the best way. My kiddos dominance fight alot. Until there is blood there is no ...


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