Hot answers tagged

8

As long as the area the food falls on is kept clean with cat-safe cleaners and daily/bi-daily vacuuming or similar, this is actually a far better option than feeding in a bowl. It feeds your cat what he needs, but also helps keep him active (low activity levels is consistently a problem with domesticated cats). As long as cleanliness is kept in mind, this ...


8

This condition is called Exertional or Capture Myopathy. Specifically, according to the Manual of Common Diseases and Parasites of Wildlife in Northern British Columbia Exertional or capture myopathy (disease of the muscle) is a non-infectious disease of muscles that is characterized by damage to muscle tissues brought about by physiological changes, ...


6

I had this same issue with our dog. It sounds like separation anxiety. We solved the issue by using counter conditioning. Basically, you want to make the thing she fears (your leaving) associated with something she loves. For our dog, it was a treat in a Kong. It takes our dog about 20 minutes to get the treat out of a Kong. When we left, we gave her ...


6

I would like to add an answer here, one that is unfortunately given too rarely. Very often we are looking for the reason why dogs perform an (usually) unwanted behaviour. It seems that this will help us correct the behaviour but there are two pitfalls here: first one is that it is a behaviour that has to be corrected while it is usually just a matter of ...


4

The suggestions by littlekellilee are all very good ones and should reduce most problem urination. That said it sounds like he is "pissed off" and this is how he is relieving himself. Suggestions 1 & 2 are great for most problem urination ones but maybe not this situation (though they can only make the situation better- not worse). 3 Can help let him ...


4

Cats generally prefer to go in a litterbox. There's a few things you can try: 1) Get a larger litter box. Maybe he doesn't think the size is big enough and is finding it difficult to use because of the cone. A larger one may make it easier for him. 2) Get several litter boxes and put them around the house. It'll make it easier for him to see it and he ...


4

It does not harm, but your dog has no clue what you're saying. They are, however, very adept at reading body language cues, so it can sometimes seem like they 'understand'. (They do, but they understand that you're sad, not your verbal explanation of why). Likewise, they can pick out your tone, and some words they will recognise and have formed an ...


4

I have had two kittens from a very young age 6-8 weeks. I suggest gentle persuasion. Make sure he has love, support from you. Don't force affection, reach your hand out slowly let him smell you. Softly stroke behind his ears. Get toys that will encourage him to play.... Don't worry he will. Just persevere. My kittens have so many toys, soft balls, mice, ...


4

Well first of all, the cat isn't shutting you out when it closes its eyes. Usually that is a sign they are at ease or are fine with you being there. Since it's still a kitten and doesn't have its mother it will naturallt cling to the older cat as a parent figure. Always let the kitten come to you and when the kitten is asleep/ resting near you make sure you ...


4

This may be severe illness, having the veterinary see your cat is urgent. Vet examination does not have to bind you into further payments due to an expensive treatment, if such is needed. You may even find out that there is a simple remedy to your cat's condition costing little or nothing.


3

That's a tough dilemma - and not one that has an easy or straightforward answer. For most breeds 12 is relatively old but not decrepit, flying however is stressful and scary for them and for some breeds that have pug-style noses it can carry significant risk of them experiencing respiratory distress. A thorough check from a vet who knows of the intended plan ...


3

It sounds like your vet has recommended all the major treatments for this frustrating condition. Diet One thing you did not mention in detail is diet. This is a cat I would put on a prescription urinary diet. Hill's c/d is a good choice, as well as Purina ProPlan UR or Royal Canin Urinary SO. These urinary diets are formulated to keep the urine pH low to ...


3

This will definitely vary dog to dog and can even affect their house training since they don't know where to go. If your dog seems to be taking a while to adjust introduce them to the new house like you would a puppy. Confine them to the most 'lived in' room first. Once they get used to that add more rooms. Show them where they need to relieve themselves ...


3

It all depends on what you want to get from your pet turtle. If you get happiness just from providing it with a happy habitat and seeing it go about it's day amicably, then your turtle should become well accustomed to your presence through normal interactions like feeding it and cleaning its habitat. It's just a matter of time. If you get more happiness ...


3

Like you added in a comment, a plant like java moss or something that floats would probably make the fish more comfortable. Snails would also be acceptable as they are interesting for curious or bored fishes. Neons start to bite each other's fins when they are stressed. Being in a school makes them less stressed, but only 2 fishes is not enough for this ...


3

Your cat is scared because her instincts interpreted the loud noise as a threat in her territory, but being unable to identify what that threat was, she is also unable to determine that it is now gone. The fact you were holding her when the threat appeared may have had her associate it with you, which is unfortunate, but hopefully it returning when you weren’...


2

Our rabbit just died today because she was young and got scared to death by out giant dog. She escaped the cage and ran in front of him, he lunged, she ran and hid as he tried to grab her and when I picked he up her breathing was crazy and then she passed, eyes open in shock. The dog didn't touch her, just scared her.


2

The answer about using a Kong is good. Since you have the time to do this now it is best if you follow a specific routine when leaving and always leave her in the same area. Using a crate is best because it provides her with a clear answer of where to be and what to do while you are away. Put her the crate with the Kong full of goodies or a fresh butcher ...


2

For us, what worked was confining the cat (with the litter box of course), to an area with no access to any beds/bedrooms. For us, this meant the cement-floored portion of our basement. We spent a couple of weeks like this, then tried again for a longer period when it failed (with visits and snuggles throughout both confinements of course). Another thing ...


2

I would say that a quick response will not happen. Normally for a dog to get used to a action/ situation they would need at minimum of a thousand repetitions of that action. For example having a friend come over and ring the doorbell, then you diverting the dogs attention to a treat or toy eventually this will lead to the dog getting used to the sound. The ...


2

I agree with the previous answer, as long as the floor is cleaned regularly and is safe for your cat it's okay.


2

Many dogs adapt well to two meals and two walks a day, especially in an active family environment. Mix in family outings where the dog joins your family. Consider longer walks, hikes, day trips, overnight camping, trips to the dog park. Weekend activities that include everybody will support stronger bonds. Amp up some of the walks with jogging/running. ...


2

My advice would be to never leave a dog with a complete stranger. This will increase anxiety and nerves. If you want to board it with someone, make sure that they are very well introduced to the dog sitter. Any good dog sitter will ask this to happen anyway before taking him/her on. Meet the sitter a few times, get them to make a fuss with the dog, play ...


2

My female kitten does a similar thing - we have netting over the balcony, so she watches birds but can't catch them. It doesn't seem to cause her any stress, and I think she views it as more of a game. I'm not a vet, but I believe it's similar to toys - they run after them, and sometimes catch them, but sometimes don't. I don't think it's stressful for cats, ...


2

You're going to have to think outside-of-the-box for combination of possible remedies like: try walking with a friend and their dog to get them familiar with the idea that the other dog isn't a threat and maybe try switching leashed dogs to get your dog to understand you have control over the other dog and that it's not a threat as you pet it in front of ...


1

Whenever you add a new member to your home (dog, cat, human, etc.) all of the animals in your home go through a re-calibration phase to figure out where they stand in the chain of authority. What you're seeing with your new dogs "bossy" behavior is her testing the waters - What can I do/not do? Who listens to me? Who do I need to listen to? She is ...


1

There's nothing to worry about, it's just because he extra loves you, and wants you to smell like him and be his. When you see him licking himself a-lot, that could be a sign of anxiety. But if you're sure he likes your place and feels at home, then no worries, he just loves to see you back and that's how he expresses it. It's not a play move by the way, ...


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