Hot answers tagged

12

A name is really just a cue for a generic "pay attention" behaviour. In my dogs, the response can range from running towards me, to turning a head towards me, to sometimes just flicking an ear towards me, depending on their activity level at the time. I'd expect to see the same response in a horse. It's possible that horses sometimes do not develop as ...


10

Salt controls the hydration level of the horse and is generally absent from their normal diet, in comparison to mineral requirements such as potassium, hence the reason you need to provide it. If the sodium level of the horse is below optimal, the horse's body will act to conserve the salt levels in their body at the expense of other minerals and water, ...


9

People's opinions on this will likely vary widely. Personally, I favour a set-up that allows enough pasture for horses to graze without need for supplementation in fair weather. I also feel strongly that it is better for the horse if they can be outside as much as possible. I know that many horses spend much of their lives in stables, but I have seen many ...


9

It's not necessity to shoe a horse. In your case, I don't see a reason to shoe your horse. Shoeing is done when the horse is used for racing purpose or the horse is to be used on places where it is filled with stones and sands. You wrote your horses don't run on rough lands. Again, shoeing can give birth to infections around the nails often. Sometimes shoes ...


8

Do your horses seem to be losing weight? Are their ribs showing? Are they lethargic? Do their necks or haunches look thin or bony? If you're unsure, I recommend asking the vet's opinion. How much you need to feed them will depend on their age, metabolism, and how much grass is available to them. I'd recommend starting out with 1-2 40lb. bales of hay/day. If ...


7

This is not cruel. Unfortunately, you aren't going to find a consensus on when it's right to blanket a horse, because it depends so much on your horse's situation. Personally, I have 5 horses in their prime years of life, that have been on the property for years and are allowed to grow a full natural coat. I tend to blanket mine below 40deg Fahrenheit when ...


7

Appaloosa is a breed of horse originating from America. It's commonly known for its spotty coat colours. However, there are other requirements for a registered Appaloosa: White sclera Mottled skin (most notably around the mouth,eyes, genitalia and anus) Have a height between 14-16hh Striped hooves My Appaloosa in the image below displays the white sclera, ...


6

Hay starts growing in the field in the spring. It becomes time to mow (cut) the hay down as the hot weather of summer arrives. The green cut hay dries in the swaths in the field and is then baled for transport out of the field. This is first cut hay. As summer bares on the cut field will grow up another stand of hay. This second stand is cut, dried and ...


6

There is a couple of ways to dampen or limit the ammonia smell. Baking soda: You can add this to the bedding and you do not need to use a lot of it. You can get this in bags from 1 kg to 1000 kg. It limits the smell of ammonia by increasing the PH so less urea is converted to ammonia. Lime: You can add this to the bedding but you need to use a larger amount ...


5

So, we probably need a little more information as to your situation to provide a better answer. However, I can probably point you in the right direction. First, what kind of beginner are we talking about? Is it a child or an adult? Do they have any experience with horses at all or is completely brand new to them. Have you figured out the logistics of the ...


4

Treats There are countless treats which are safe for horses. The majority of fruits and vegetables are safe, along with some foods you might not expect, like candy. In general, as long as you aren't feeding them more than a little at a time, they'll be fine. It's hard to list every single food you could ever consider feeding a horse, so here are the most ...


4

I feed my horse only with grass, hay, oats if I trained him and supplementary minerals adapted to his blood tests. As a treat I use pressed flax pellets (what remains when pressing flax oil) or for special occasions small parts of organic carrots. I don't feed apples or bananas because they contain huge amounts of sugar. Apples are also very acidic which is ...


4

From your description it sounds as if the problem is isolated to this one hoof, so I'm assuming that there is not a general problem with Franks hoofs. Maybe it would be wise to have an X-ray done on the problematic hoof, to see whether there is some debris (maybe even metallic) or something causing the abscess to come back on that one hoof. Long-time (and ...


4

More than physical space, owning a horse requires significant investment of time and money. How much space a horse needs shouldn't be the main question of whether or not to get a horse. That being said, the answer is...it depends. Big active horses will 'require' more space than little old ponies. There is not really a minimum space needed to keep a horse, ...


4

I don't know much about a horses diet, but I once saw a documentary about war horses in WWI. Keeping the animals healthy and fed was a big problem, so people noticed that horses who recently had dental care needed much less food (up to 30% food reduction if I remember correctly). This article lists among the benefits of dental care for horses: Improved ...


4

Whole oat would be the only source I can think of at the moment. In case of mineral deficits I'd always consider changing the hay if you feed one. If you can, analyse it and compare with other hays. Might be that you can cover up mineral deficits with other hay as the quality differs a lot. Maybe you can also change the weed and gras-combination on the ...


4

A horse owner should have some different kits that cover up. I will mention not only those things which a horse owner renting at a barn with many other people will own, but also those, which the stable owner will find useful. During my work at stables we needed most of them and I wouldn't want to miss any of it somewhere in the stable. The list might be ...


4

I'm not familiar with Australian vegetation and fire screening technology, but a relatively simple measure you can employ is creating a network of firebreaks around and in between your paddocks. This doesn't stop the panic and air pollution in case of a fire, but at least it might save the lives of your horses. As long as it's hot and dry, vegetation growth ...


3

Here in Germany the professionals learn a thumb rule stating that a horse of half a ton weight (which is a rather small standardbred) needs roughly 1-1.5 hectare per year for food supplement. So when it comes to food, roughly multiply the number of horses by 1.25 hectare (which is 10,000 square metres). It depends on the ground, the soil, the plants, the ...


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