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30

Probably one of the worst things tuna has, is the high levels of mercury. Even in humans, high levels of mercury acts as a neurotoxin, damaging the brain and nervous system. Since cats have a much smaller body mass than humans, their tolerance for mercury is going to be lower as well. For that reason, it's important to limit how much tuna you feed your cats. ...


13

I don't think it is possible and more importantly and don't think it is needed. Trying to hide the treats? The olfactory capabilities of dogs are tens of thousands times more developed than ours. That means that even if you find a treat bag and that the dog can't smell the treats, as soon as you open it the dog will smell the treats. Then your fingers will ...


12

As Matt S. says, I've never seen any situation where a cat overdosing on catnip did worse than vomit (spectacularly in this cat's case...). That said, since vomiting isn't a particularly enjoyable experience, it makes sense to limit your cat's access to catnip and keep the dosage to a level she can tolerate - let her get high without going overboard. In ...


12

I have not come across any cases of catnip overdose where the cat did anything worse than vomit. Some cats know when they've had enough, and some cats don't. Luckily, there doesn't seem to be any harmful side-effects. So the cats that don't know any better don't risk harming themselves. I can't say that I've seen any behavior indicating addiction either. I ...


10

In general, I would avoid giving cooked bones to a dog. Cooking makes the bones very brittle and much more likely to shard and cause injury. It's also because they're cooked that they crunched through them so quickly, they just won't stand up to any real pressure from the jaws of a dog. If you want to give them bones, you might want to look around for a dog-...


9

We have an aggressive chewer as well and I have found a few chews that she won't destroy too quickly: Himalayan Chews : A lot of pet stores sell these in several different sizes depending on the dog's size. These are yak-milk products, but are cured so they do not cause the intolerance issues that cheese normally does for dogs. They are very hard, and it ...


8

It would be hard for us to say what is "special" or not. We don't really know your cat. We don't know her likes or dislikes or the kinds of treats or food you normally feed. If you were to be asked the same question for yourself, it would vastly differ from what my answer would be for myself. Probably the best thing to do is to give her the food that she ...


7

In my experience the benefits of chewing raw or smoked bones far outweigh the draw backs. They work really well keeping the dogs teeth clean... much better than brushing I have found. They really help give puppies and young dogs something to chew on to meet that need. I hear that it also serves as a good calcium source but I don't know the scientific facts ...


7

Both of my cats (mother and daughter) have a fondness for catnip. Like typical dry treats, shaking the packaging it comes in will make a noise your cat should be able to hear without difficulty. The mother cat has a fondness for wet cat food, but will not eat dried fish treats (though she is very interested in the smell). Her daughter is the exact opposite:...


7

One instance of a cat drinking 4oz of water in a sitting is not really alarming, but if you are noticing a pattern of your cat drinking more water than usual, repeatedly emptying the bowl in one sitting, or other unusual patterns of excessive water drinking, that is a reason to take your cat to the vet. It can indicate diabetes or kidney disease, or a ...


6

Another issue with using canned tuna as the bulk of the diet as opposed to tuna cat food is that the tuna won't have the additives that are added particularly for cats. Cat food has added taurine, the absence of which can lead to blindness. This would not be an issue for using tuna as a treat.


5

Possibly something like a Ziploc bag would work. But like Cedric said, dogs' senses of smell are much greater than ours. There are treat pouches used for training that you can take with you. I doubt that they keep the dog from smelling the treats, but they at least make it possible to carry them around with you without them crumbling in your pockets. ...


5

As you probably know, rabbits love to chew and they need to chew. Fresh wood is generally a good thing and you can give them fresh cut apple branches. When we still had rabbits, we used to supply them with plenty of apple branches from our yard (we had 3 apple trees) all year round. In the spring and summer that meant also getting leafy branches, but even in ...


5

I would guess that it's some combination of being high in protein, high in fats (cats are as tuned to seek high-energy-source foods as we are, but it's claimed that they don't much notice sugar), having an interesting texture (consider potato chips as an equivalent), having a smell thst they can recognize and anticipate from a greater distance... My previous ...


5

I don't like answering my own question, but because I came across this article below and it's slightly different than the answers above, I thought I'd post it as an alternative answer. I also respect the "don't give cats supplements" or "a drop of fish oil" answers, too. I don't necessarily think this is right, but it's an option to ...


4

So... I did a little research. There exists in the world a substitute for chocolate that is doggie safe: carob. This is much less sweet and lacks the toxic substance (theobromine) that makes chocolate dangerous to dogs. Even white chocolate has this issue, though much less so. and suffers from sugar volume. Basically, take 3 cups of white carob chips and ...


4

The biggest danger I'm aware of (aside from possible chewing off a piece bigger than they can chew and choking) is that the rawhide can expand when it gets wet. So when a dog ingests rawhide, it expands either in their stomach, or in their intestines, blocking their normal bodily functions and causing them harm. Another is a manufacturing issue. Rawhide is ...


4

Tuna in oil is the only thing my sick cat can digest at the moment. He has lung inflammation and is on medication; the coughing is making him swallow air, which in turn is making him "gak" a lot. That fake kitty tuna is plastic or something; after 6 hours after digestion, it comes up whole, whereas tuna for humans is giving him moisture and is getting ...


4

If a dog is too excited by something (either positive or negative) he may refuse a treat that he would normally accept. You can think about it this way: You're walking down the street and see a quarter. You might bend down and pick it up. But what if you also see a $100 bill a few feet down the road? You're much less likely to pick that quarter up. At ...


4

You can try distracting her with something else. My dog gets this way with balls and she's an expert guarder. Squeek a toy that she can't see, or try acting like you're about to go out (jingling keys, putting on shoes, etc.). If she's super into either of those things she'll likely drop the bone to see what's up. Generally though, to train her to drop the ...


4

I feed my horse only with grass, hay, oats if I trained him and supplementary minerals adapted to his blood tests. As a treat I use pressed flax pellets (what remains when pressing flax oil) or for special occasions small parts of organic carrots. I don't feed apples or bananas because they contain huge amounts of sugar. Apples are also very acidic which is ...


4

Treats There are countless treats which are safe for horses. The majority of fruits and vegetables are safe, along with some foods you might not expect, like candy. In general, as long as you aren't feeding them more than a little at a time, they'll be fine. It's hard to list every single food you could ever consider feeding a horse, so here are the most ...


4

Never ever give sweets to cats; first of all, because it might kill your cat; and second, cats cannot taste sweetness. The reason why your cat drinks lots of water is to try to flush out the poison from its system. Cats cannot digest carbohydrates (sugar-starch found in plant matter) in an effective way.


4

I suggest you look for freeze dried fish cat treats. Typically fish is the only ingredient. They are somewhat smelly (which for pets is generally a desirable characteristic). It's easy to break into the desired size bits, so you can make it very small bits for regular treats, then use larger bits or some tuna for a 'jackpot treat'. If this doesn't work for ...


3

The ASPCA has a useful list of foods to avoid on their website, and as far as I can tell the information is consistent with what I've learned from vets and other reputable sources. Also see their list of poisonous plants. If there's a specific food that you've received conflicting information about, you might want to ask about that specifically so we can ...


3

There's a company called LokSak that makes odor-proof bags called "OpSaks" which are often used for food storage when in the wilderness (to keep the bears at bay). They might work for storing dog treats as well. They come in various sizes.


3

Don't forget that it is the dog who decides what's a reward, what's not or what's a punishment. So in your case he chose that the best reward is catching the frisbee. Don't worry about it and use it to teach him new tricks: sit and stay until I release you and you go catch the frisbee, heel, or any other trick.


3

If the dog is sufficiently rewarded by the activity itself you do not need treats, which will only distract from what you're trying to train. He doesn't want it, that's a good sign that he's been rewarded enough. The idea behind training is to eventually make the dog happy with nothing more than your approval. You're getting there, don't hinder progress ...


3

Fish in general is something cats love but it isn't so great for them. Fish can have relatively high levels of magnesium and phosphorus. This isn't an issue for some creatures but one of the main things that can cull cats later in life are urinary tract problems. Magnesium and phosphorus can contribute to the formation of kidney stones and adversely impact ...


3

There's a persistent rumor (at least where I live) that all hollow bones (like those in legs) are harmful to dogs and all non-hollow bones (like ribs and shoulder blades) are safe. This myth is wrong. It's rather correct that all raw bones are safe for dogs and all cooked ones are harmful. Raw bones are no danger to dogs because they're part of their natural ...


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