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15

Dude, don't try to treat that cat yourself, no matter what the advice you get on here. Get it to a vet as soon as you can, or find someone else who can. It looks pretty bad (a lot worse than "encrusted dirt and dust"). I realize you are trying to help the poor guy - and I applaud you for that - but please be careful to be sure you are doing more good than ...


11

Strabismus the medical name for this condition. It can affect one or both eyes, and the eyes may tend towards any particular direction (not just inwards). Siamese cats breed from the original stock given to the Europeans tend to inherient this trait because they were culls (unknown to the Europeans!). (As an aside, the cat in the picture lacks the ...


10

Still hard to tell from the pictures and I wouldn't be able to just diagnose in any event (I'm not a vet), but it does look a bit like encrusted dirt and dust (I don't think that's what it is, just looks like it) from the photo. However, there are a few things I think you should do: Give the kitten access to water, a shallow bowl would be ideal. Go out and ...


9

The green shine is caused by tapetum lucidum. My Dachshund has it as well, although in both eyes, and the shine is actually very dim. As to your dog's differing appearance of her eyes, Found on a forum called the Naked Scientists: I'll have a go at it... Here's what we know. The tapetum lucidum, formed by the choroid at the back of the eye, is ...


8

Cats can't literally "see in the dark", although they can see better in dim light than people can, because their pupils can expand to let more light in. So like us, they need some light, the more the better up to a point. (Glaring lights can make it as difficult to see as no light at all.) A cat's vision is different than ours in other ways. Their colour ...


8

All I read about colour vision of cats state: Cats have only two colour receptors (green and blue), where humans have three (green, blue and red). So, probably everything which appears red to us, may be a very pale green to a cat. On top of that, cats have much more rods in their retina than we have. This (and their reflecting sheet under their retina) ...


8

They need to see a vet, chances are it's feline rhinotracheitis which can cause some issues with eyes (we see this a lot in our cats from the SPCA), it could also be an eye infection which would require antibiotic eye drops. Only way to know and treat is by taking them to a vet.


7

It is called tapetum lucidum and it works similarly for many (nocturnal) mammals. Humans and most primates don't have it, cats and dogs do. It is a tissue in front of the retina. It lets the light go through but reflects the light coming back from the retina, sending it back to the retina and thus increasing the amount of light available for (night) vision. ...


6

The greenish light you're seeing is a reflective layer of tissue found in most animals that have evolved to see in the dark called Tapetum lucidum. The way it allows animals to see better in the dark, is by increasing the amount of light the eyes can use through reflection. The tapetum lucidum /təˈpiːtəm/ (Latin: "bright tapestry", plural tapeta ...


6

I concur with all the answers that say "take this cat to the vet, do not try to treat this on your own". The pictures are poor quality -but- to me it looks like some kind of infection. I would also say: quarantine this cat, do not let it near other cats until this medical problem is taken care of, and have a vet give it a general exam (in addition to ...


6

I got a veterinarian ophthalmologist at an emergency clinic. And the news is not so good. My baby has an hereditary cataracts, and apparently sees only shadows in the right eye. And the prognostic is attacking the left eye also. The vet advised a surgery to remove the cataracts as soon as possible, and after put a lens to see properly again. In the next ...


6

To be completely technical, no animal can see in complete darkness, although many animals see much better than us in low light levels such as the level of natural darkness that occurs at night. According to articles such as http://www.bio.miami.edu/hare/vision.html rabbits have more rod cells than humans in their eyes resulting in superior vision in ...


5

Dogs in general are not color blind, but they see fewer colors than we humans. Dogs see can shades of blue and yellow. Here's a study that talks about it. http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/new-study-shows-that-dogs-use-color-vision-after-all-13168563/?no-ist


5

Your dog has OCD - Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. Certain dogs - especially hardcore working breeds like Border Collies and Australian Shepherds - are predisposed to developing OCD when they are not mentally stimulated enough. The most common cause for OCD in dogs is boredom. Unfortunately you encouraged her by playing with laser pointers. That's like ...


4

A Harvard study performed in the 1960s on cats (Hubel and Weisel), which have 3D vision similar to us, included artificially inducing strabismus (cross-eyed). A summary (really, really, basic summary) of the results of the tests indicated a weakening of vision and a loss of depth perception in cats where normal vision was changed in some manner. While cats ...


4

Siamese cats often have a neurological oddity which routes some of the nerves from each eye to the same hemisphere of the brain, rather than crossing over as is normal in mammals. (Websearch "siamese strabismus" and "optic chiasm" for details. I found it fascinating to discover that something similar may happen in partial-albino big cats.) Siamese ...


4

Some possible causes for your dog's loss of vision are: Diabetic Retinopathy This is where the eyes are damaged by high blood sugar levels. Warning signs of diabetes in dogs are drinking excessive amounts of water, incontinence, lethargy and weight loss. WebMD's section on diabetes in dogs suggests that Miniature Schnauzers are prone to diabetes in old age. ...


4

In some cats (Siamese among them), crossed eyes can actually be the cat's way of compensating for a neurological abnormality in which the optic nerves split so part of each eye's vision is reaching both hemispheres of the brain rather than one each. Some cats with this condition may also, or instead, continuously move their gaze back and forth a bit (...


4

Obviously, you can't get a dog to read an eye chart, but there are other means of determining visual acuity. In particular, retinoscopy can be used to detect the reaction in the dogs eye. There are also some more manual tests, one that you can do at home, using room layouts and light and dark rooms. If the dog navigates okay in both conditions, then eyesight ...


4

Because cats (dogs and many other animals) eyes have very sensitive Tapetum lucidum, your cat can see you and what's going on in the room she's occupying, before the light comes on, so there is little or no reaction. While it may seem counter-intuitive that she's not startled, or more sensitive to the change in lighting, it's normal for animals with ...


3

My late dog had a similar situation with her eyes (but in both) for years. The vet told us that it was fatty buildup that shouldn't affect her vision but that she should go on diet food anyway. The diet food didn't seem to help. We never determined what the actual cause was, but she didn't seem to have issues with her vision. But as the folks in the ...


3

I am not quite sure if it works exactly the same but I needed to test the eyesight of my dog for a while because of infection. What I did was put my finger up and approach it slowly to see if she would react in case she got blind. As I understood from the vet, every animal would turn away when you get too close to the eye. Doing this with some speed will ...


3

I found a website that I will quote one section from it. I don't know if a colour scheme would help but this section might help for the rest of your question. How Can I Create a Safe, Fulfilling Environment for My Blind Dog? FROM: https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/dog-care/blindness You can help your dog feel secure in his surroundings by providing a ...


3

Please have your dog's eyes checked by a veterinarian. I fostered a dog with dry eye. She lost her sight in one eye, that eye did not reflect light. If your dog has one eye that does not reflect light, his sight in his other eye is even more important. Make sure he does not need an inexpensive medication ($20/month) to save his vision in his other eye ...


3

You should take her to the vet. She likely has some type of wound (insect sting, infected laceration) and a vet will be able to tell what type of wound it is and how to treat it. Further, if she hasn't been eating or drinking for longer than a day, she may be suffering from some of the complications of anorexia, such as dehydration or even hepatic lipidosis....


3

Great answer but I will add a few things. Cats are crepuscular rather than nocturnal, which means they their eyes are evolved to operate at twilight. Cats have several visual adaptations to operate better at twilight. Cats have 6 to 8 times more rod cells in their eyes. Rod cells distinguish the shapes, edges and textures rather than the colour. As a trade-...


3

There are several factors that affect your dog's perception of a TV or other screen. Perception of motion: Display devices rely on displaying a rapid sequence of still images to produce the illusion of motion (the phi phenomenon). Dogs have a higher flicker fusion threshold than humans, so a screen that appears to show continuous motion to humans might ...


3

Yes and no. That is, in some areas they see better, and in some areas they see worse. Both human eyes and dog eyes have rod and cone cells making up the retina. Rods are better at vision in low light conditions and detecting motion. Cones are better at visual acuity and can actually detect color. In comparison to humans, dogs have more rod cells, which means ...


3

The light reflecting cells in the dog's eye do send light to the light sensitive cells one extra time, giving the dog better night vision than we humans have. But just as in humans, dogs can have eye problems and many of these problems can be treated by medication if they are diagnosed early; if you wait, the dog might be totally blind. Here is article about ...


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