12

We have a cat that sneezes a lot, there are many reasons why a cat might sneeze including various viruses and dental issues. However, your cat is sneezing under a specific condition, which is basically a cheek rub with sufficient pressure against a hard, angled, surface. The underlying cause of this can, in fact, be dental even if you can't see it. In fact,...


7

One of my animals had severe nosebleeds and I did the following: Keep the pet as calm as possible. In any animal, including humans, nosebleeding can be somewhat controlled by blood pressure and hormones produced by the body. Place ice on the nose and keep the room cool. Heat can cause vasodilation, which allows more blood to flow; if the cat gets excited ...


7

It's a sign of an upper respiratory infection. Home treatment is to put her in the bathroom while you take a hot, steamy shower (okay, I've never seen results with this) or to give her some saline drops in her nose to help clean her nose out (GOOD LUCK I can only do it because this is our most docile cat). If it continues, you should take her to the vet ...


5

Dogs can sneeze for a number of reasons, most commonly for: Infections in the nasal passages. Seems unlikely for your pooch given that head position seems to be a factor. Allergies, again seems unlikely, except that the nose up may be allowing for dust or other allergens to more readily enter. Far fetched in this respect. Gum and tooth issues. This may be ...


4

The symptoms that you describe seem to describe feline herpes (also known as FHV-1). The ASPCA lists symptoms of a feline herpes infection as Sneezing “attacks” Discharge from the nose and eyes Conjunctivitis or pink eye (inflammation of the eyelid) Lesions in and around the eyes Eye ulcers Congestion Fever Depression Loss of appetite ...


3

When he's on his back, is he looking up into a light, the bright sky, or the sun? If so, it might be a harmless photic reflex. This happens to other animals besides humans. I don't know how common it is in dogs.


3

The symptoms (not eating, vomiting, lethargic) indicate Canine parvovirus (parvo for short). I'll be short with this answer in saying that the pups will perish if not immediately treated by a vet. This can also spread to other dogs very quickly - it's possible that the whole litter could become ill. A lot of the time with a litter of pups a vet will do a ...


3

I'll be answering from my experience with our 4 cats as well as the 2 cats of my parents. As always: If in doubt, contact a 2nd vet. The sneezing you describe doesn't sound worrying to me in any way. You shouldn't need to see a vet again. If your cat is an indoors cat, the chances of rabies are actually pretty small. I'll go into detail on sneezing and ...


3

Yes, she needs to see a vet to be properly diagnosed. One way to make vet visits easier on shy cats is to use a mobile vet who will come to your home. Then you only have to deal with stranger and handling stress, and not the added stresses of a carrier, travel, and a strange place. Another way to ease the stress of a vet visit is to look for a Cat ...


2

Our kitty had violent sneezing fits with bloody discharge and while they stopped after treating him with humidification (having him stay in the bathroom while we showered) and saline to keep his nasal cavity clean and hydrated, he since passed with what ended up being a hernia of his diaphragm. While we took him in to the vet when he sneezed up blood, our ...


2

Anecdotal The probiotic that I'm most familiar with is Fortiflora. Fortiflora is popular not only for it's probiotic properties, but also as a readily available source of animal digest (which can make unpalatable food smell REALLY GOOD). I have used it for this reason when getting cats to switch to wet food from a dry food diet. I have one cat with FHV-1, ...


2

I haven't been able to find any studies on the effects of poor air quality on animals, but I was able to find quite a bit of general guidance. The American Veterinary Medical Association says this (and the guidance is very similar to other sources): As irritating as smoke can be to people, it can cause health problems for animals as well. Smoke from ...


2

The gold standard for evaluating a treatment is to look at meta-analyses. This type of research paper looks at multiple studies and judges the experimental design, sample size, and other factors that may influence results to determine the overall outcome of multiple studies. A meta-analysis for lysine supplementation as a treatment for FHV-1 was published ...


1

Although I do not know the answer specifically for feline herpes, L-lysine is helpful for human herpes (HSV-1 and HSV-2). Lysine and arginine are both amino-acids that pair with each other. The herpes virus feeds on arginine, so keeping the ratio of lysine higher than arginine is quite helpful in preventing and/or reducing the severity of outbreaks. Lysine ...


1

I haven't heard of it happening several times an hour, or for so long, but my dog sometimes coughs/hacks like he's gonna throw up a hairball, and like twice a year it means he's going to throw up. But other than that, there's nothing wrong with it. I also haven't heard of them hacking if you pet them "too hard" or don't handle them delicately. For ...


1

I had a cat who had this problem and my vet advised using saline nasal drops to help clear the mucous (you drip in a drop or two, then let her sneeze everything out, it can be a mess). This cat was extremely docile and would let me do anything to him. Once I was clipping his claws and accidentally cut the quick (so he started bleeding). I told him to stay ...


1

None of my animals have had that problem, so the following ideas are based on my experience as a human with chronic nasal congestion. Shut her in the bathroom with you when you take a shower. Make it a nice, hot, steamy shower. This should help loosen some of the mucus. Get her to drink extra water. Pet stores sell water fountains designed for pets to ...


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