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28

It's not really about age once they get past 6 months, and it depends on him. If he's the reclusive sort that doesn't want or expect a lot of attention, you can have a friend come over daily to make sure he's got food and water and a little play time, and tend to the litter box as it needs it. It's good to have feeding systems that store enough for a couple ...


26

Anecdotally, I have to first say that not all cats hate riding in the car. I've known at least one cat that was perfectly content to ride in the car. This cat started as a kitten going for rides to all sorts of different places, which is probably directly relevant to what follows in this answer. I believe that the main difference between cats and dogs in ...


20

As of November 2013, Amtrak does not allow pets on trains (see Amtrak's website). However, there are bills in Congress which would require Amtrak to change this policy: H.R. 2066: Pets on Trains Act of 2013 and S. 1710: Pets on Trains Act of 2013. The bills state that Amtrak must designate at least one car (on all trains with two or more cars) for ...


19

I doubt that there is an answer that fits all circumstances. While it might be OK for the dog to have a break every 3-4 hours, chances are that your dog needs to get out earlier. Try to keep an eye on your dog while driving. If he seems to get nervous and starts moving around a lot, it might be best to stop and let him out of the car. When we did longer ...


14

When transporting cats in carriers, I always put the crates in the back seat of the car and run the seat belt through the handle on the top and around the side of the crate. Like with children, the back seat is safest for cats and other pets, not only physically in event of a crash, but also limiting distraction to the driver (as when I have the crate in the ...


14

Assuming you aren't driving and therefore can't place them in a bucket with an air source, the best bet is to ship them in breathable bags. The most widely-known breathable bags are Kordon Breathing Bags: Stocked sizes include: - 5.5" x 8" - 7.5" x 12" - 11.5" x 19" Breathing Bags allow the transfer of carbon dioxide and oxygen through the ...


13

There are a few distinct ways you can tackle this: 1) Look into getting a quality cat sitter. Talk to friends with pets, people in your neighborhood with pets, people at your vet's office. The unfortunate thing is that you will have to filter through a lot of bad info, but eventually you should be able to find some really good pet sitters. I'd ...


13

I ended up discussing this with my vet one day (one of the girls had surgery and stopped eating, so we inserted a feeding tube to feed her until she started feeling better. We picked her up from the vet, got the feeding lesson, and went home. She puked on the way home, so we had to go back and make sure everything was still in place). It's my vet's belief ...


12

No, you should avoid doing that. You should, at least, make someone visit the cat twice a day. It's a misconception that a cat can live alone for many days, but it's not true. Domestic cats can become depressed, and even get sick. A few more problems can include: Cat who develops a urinary track infection can become critically ill in less than 24 hours....


11

From my experience (I shipped a cat from Brisbane, Australia to Houston, Texas - which was a LOT more than a 5 hour journey), I can offer some suggestions. Water is essential. Most of the places that handle shipping will ensure water is available. If there are any delays or long layovers, you'll need to arrange for someone to be with the pet in the airport (...


9

Depending on the country someone will be driving your dog in, some laws may be in effect about this topic. The best way to know is to ask your vet about this. For example, here in France, you have to make sure that the dog will, in no circumstance, be able to reach the driver if sitting on the backseat. So a net is in order if you are not using the belt. ...


8

Generally speaking, all dogs will handle car travel differently. My sister's small dog throws up every time he gets in the car, so he has a his own crate for car travel. It helps him feel safe so he doesn't get sick as often and also helps confine the mess if he does get sick. Whereas my dog enjoys it and has a lot of freedom to move. He doesn't scratch ...


7

I can't tell you what to do, I've done both and what I do depends on a lot on what is currently going on in the home as well as my cats' personalities. This is a list of the questions I go through when considering the best situation for my pets. What is the Health of My Cat? Generally, any cat who is ill (with either an acute or chronic condition) should be ...


7

Some creepy words of caution. Airlines may or may not regard your pet as little more than baggage. There have been lots of incidents of pet deaths due to negligence of airline workers in handling the animals (not making sure they are in a temperature controlled place, or not giving them enough food or water, or accidentally crushing the animal....) I ...


7

I travel often with my rabbits, a normal trip to the vet tends to be an hour by car, and a several hour trip to go camping is not usual. The SleepyPod you indicate in your question or a hard sided carrier would be fine for travelling. But 4km on a bumpy road by bicycle would be a problem. Rabbits can be Scarred to Death. In Rabbit speak Thumping can be a ...


7

It all depends on the personality of your cat I think, but for the most part, I consider it do-able. I've made a similar trip several times for visiting family on holidays. Though my drive is only 12 hours, I've never had any problems. On the other hand, my sister's cats seem to always put up a fuss even though their drives are significantly shorter. The ...


7

Airplanes maintain air pressure in both the passenger cabin and the cargo hold. The reason for the passenger cabin is obviously health and safety of the passengers, but in the cargo hold it is for various goods and, possibly, animals that might be in it that also require pressure. Near vacuum isn't really a good thing for pressurized containers often carried ...


6

Cats may also get ill due to stress, so I would try to make sure she's as unstressed as you can possibly make her. Some tips I've found are: 1.Try to make the pre-vet routine less stressful. If you're running around chasing the cat to get them in the carrier right before going to the vet, they'll be more stressed out than if you manage to calmly entice ...


6

Even when the cage is secured to the car, the cat is not secured inside the cage. This means that even though the crate will not move (in relation to the car) the cat will still hit the inside of the crate in the event of an accident. For a similar reason, this is how whiplash is caused in people, where the body is secure but the head is not. I don't ...


6

When my husband and I moved from Brooklyn back to the Seattle area, we had to arrange for our two hairless cats to be driven across country for 3 days in a small SUV. One of the cats has anxiety, but they are both pretty social and adapt easily to their surroundings. We had the vet prescribe a sedative for the drive and my husband administered it to them ...


5

Unfortunately, no. Leaving a bearded dragon alone for a week is a crap shoot, at best; especially a young one. Their nutrition requirements are simply too high. As you noted, a young bearded dragon has a higher carnivorous requirement, so it's not like you can load up on hardy greens that may get them through at least part of your time away. Maintaining a ...


5

Your cats are pooping in the carrier because they are nervous. There are several strategies for dealing with this (none foolproof) As you indicate take the cat in after it poops (but the bowels still might have some stuff in them and when your cat gets really afraid...) Change the feeding schedule before the visit, for instance 6-8 hours before the visit ...


5

A few days of fasting for a healthy turtle should be no problem. You should still place more food than normal, you're turtle doesn't really have to fast. I'd suggest a bigger variety to what your feeding your turtle though. Red ear sliders are initially carnivorous turtles but they eventually turn mostly herbivorous. Even if you turtle is still young it ...


5

It's a fear reaction. My cat does it as well when I take him to the vet. You have to think about it this way. A dog is given a kennel as a bedroom and while they may be shut in sometimes, you know they know they'll get out. Most people don't do a very good job at training their dog to kennel. Almost no one trains their cats and while we often ask a dog to do ...


5

You've got a few choices. You can do a search on Amazon for "bird carrier." They tend to be a bit pricey but are built specifically for birds. Alternatively, you can go buy a small animal carrier or the smallest cat carrier you can find. Ideally it should be a hard carrier so you can seat-belt it into the car. Buy a rope perch, or any kind of perch that ...


5

I travel with rabbits over long distances, mostly by automobile. When driving we stop about every 4 hours and set up an exercise pen for them to use the bathroom, eat and drink for about 30 minutes. Eating hay or grass is most important. Sometimes they don't drink, but always give them enough time to eat. In my experience, rabbits normally prefer a ...


5

It is very hard for a cat to come to a new place and by the time your cat settles in it is time to move back home. So if it is possible for you to get a cat sitter i think this is the best option for her,When you move a cat it will always be an element of stress so in my opinion it is best to avoid this. The fact that your cat is shy will make the travel ...


4

Are you sure it is "car sick" rather than "I'm unhappy because I'm in my carrier, not at home, able to do what I want". With my "baby" I'm sure it is the second and not the first... but to a human they both look similar as they involve crying and vomiting. Cats in general hate to be taken out of their element and some get a lot more bothered by it than ...


4

I'm not sure there is a winner in this case, unfortunately for pets, cars are designed to protect humans in the case of an accident, nothing else. The biggest issue you have to take into consideration is inertia. When a car comes to a sudden stop, like in an accident, the contents of the car continue to move at the speed the car was going. That's what seat ...


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