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2

This looks like separation anxiety. Separation anxiety manifests itself more in adopted animals and kittens who are separated from their mother prematurely. The more attached the cat to you, the more separation anxiety they will suffer. So, you need to solve the underlying issue by being more available to your cat. Note that cats plan their days very well, ...


3

Well, things turned out to be that being friendly with the bird and loving him, no matter what, worked! Now I have a very lovely parrot. So rules I followed are: If parrot behaves bad then do not interact with him for a while (~20 min) (parrots love social interaction and become very upset without it) If parrot behaves good then interact with him socially (...


-2

All of this crate training is sad. Why do you people own puppies and lock them up? Especially Huskys, those dogs need to be walked several times during the day and run and play all the time. It is very clear that none of you should own a dog. They are like 4 year old children. Can you put a 4 year old in a crate and expect it to shut up and lay there? No, ...


0

When a dog goes out for a walk, it should be considered his time. This should be a happy time for them. You should NEVER try to train a dog NOT TO GO to the bathroom. It seem to me that the dog has no happy play time, everything is discipline. For myself, my dogs are just like my kids: you love them, they love back. You seem a bit young/naive: how do you ...


4

I read through your previous post, and it sounds like the cats are making headway in their potential friendship. A soft paw hit is nothing to worry about. That may even be a sign of play, since they're both pretty young! To answer your question: locking a cat up for "bad behavior" is generally not recommended, because cats will respond negatively ...


1

Dogs are typically much harder to socialize as they age. They become rigid in their routines and less open to new experiences, so it takes much more time to try address their fear and anxiety. The most important thing you can do is separate the two via a physical boundary that still allows them to view each other (e.g., crating them next to each other). This ...


1

My best guess is that it has to do with her time in the shelter. I don't know about Puerto Rican's shelters, but I guess in general the animals are left alone for most of the day and get a walk maybe once a day, maybe less common. So it seems she's simply used to being calm in her kennel (or in your house now) because there never was much to do and it was ...


3

From what I have heard/read, a lot of dogs can take some time to get used to their new surroundings. That might be one of the causes. But on the other hand, it might be similar as with people. Some people might be couch potatoes at home, just to become football players, bungee jumpers, car drifters etc. as soon as they are outside. The difference between ...


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