67

I wouldn’t start giving treats for small accidents - what kind of behavior are you trying to reinforce? The cat won’t understand the concept of an “apology” via treats. And if careless weaving results in treats, kitty may end up with receiving more kicks trying to elicit treats from the human who is stumbling to the bathroom at night. My preferred way to ...


46

I don't think there are many animals that understand the concept of apology, as a high level concept as such, except for maybe some other advanced primates. MAYBE elephants, dolphins, whales or belugas. But an apology has fundamental parts which you can communicate. Every animal genus has its own language (some are universal). What you would want to ...


18

I'm sorry to tell you that, but your approach is wrong. That's not how you train separation and independence with your dog. What you currently do is training a command. You say a specific word, your dog does what is expected of her and she gets a reward. There is a clearly defined beginning (the word) and a clearly defined ending (getting a reward). Most ...


15

Some cats are convinced they're "starving" regardless of how much food they get. Some have a particularly strong "treat drive," and will do anything to get a treat. Some just like to chew on things, particularly certain plastics. Any of those factors can lead to a cat chewing through anything that looks like a food or treat bag, and it's ...


7

Your dog needs mental and physical stimulation! The question should not be, "how can I physically trap and contain my dog?", rather, "why is my dog doing this, and how can it be corrected?". she chewed up just about every piece of paper in our house. We solved that by getting chew toys. No. Incorrect. By just buying chew toys, you haven'...


6

I can only agree with Nai54's answer. If your dog escapes your yard, it doesn't mean that the dog is bad, it means that the yard doesn't fulfill the dog's needs. A very easy way to entertain a dog is a puzzle feeder. Those come in various shapes and sizes and can also be crafted by you. Feeding a dog in a bowl is easy and boring, but feeding them in a puzzle ...


5

Every dog has their own personality and own values. As you correctly suspected, your dog values his possession of the ball more than treats. One trick you can try is trading one object with another of the same value - meaning trading one ball for another. You should only offer him the second ball if he's close enough to you that you don't have to walk far to ...


5

Well, things turned out to be that being friendly with the bird and loving him, no matter what, worked! Now I have a very lovely parrot. So rules I followed are: If parrot behaves bad then do not interact with him for a while (~20 min) (parrots love social interaction and become very upset without it) If parrot behaves good then interact with him socially (...


5

This is most likely non-recognition aggression. Cats recognize other animals by scent, not sight. This means that if one of the animals leaves the home (such as to a vet or groomer) and brings strange scents home, the cats who remained will not recognize it at first and will treat it as a threat. The only solution to this (at least after the fact) is to keep ...


5

I understand your concern for your cat, but as stated in the comments cats can keep warm quite well unless they are a breed without fur. The cat should not be in there at all If you still do not want to let your cat go into these rooms the only way is to close the door right behind you every time you go in or out. This can be relatively hard when carrying ...


5

The short answer is: No. In general, there are 2 types of cats and dogs: Those who eat everything available and those who eat only as much as they need. From an evolutionary point of view eating everything edible is an advantage because it increases your chances of surviving times when no food at all is available to you. As far as I know, what type of eater ...


5

In addition to Omar's answer, you should make your "bad" dog work for simple, everyday things. There are several different forms of puzzle feeders available that offer different levels of difficulty. Some can also be crafted as a DIY project. Have a look at this list for some different food puzzles and additional ideas to entertain your dog. The ...


5

Just in case anyone comes across this and it helps them, we persevered with outside toilet training, and he is now going outside every time and we've only had a couple of accidents. At night, we have gone from him waking every 1-3 hours, to once per night, with a quick trip outside, then back in the crate until morning. This has only taken 1 week, but when ...


5

First thing, you need to get her checked by a vet for anything that might cause her pain. Arthritis, a herniated disk or certain vitamin deficits are known to cause pain and dogs that are in pain are known to bite. The children might have touched her in a way that caused her pain and she bit in reaction to that. If the vet doesn't find anything, you need to ...


5

Your training sessions are a great start, but they would be even more effective if your dad was the one to give her the treats. Dogs use their noses much more than we do and whenever she takes a treat from dad, she connects his personal smell with positive feelings. If he's at the top of the stairs, he can throw the treat into her direction. He can simply ...


5

Cats are great with routines. Each cat has a very well defined daily program. Waking up, grooming, playing, cuddling, going for a bathroom are all planned to a finer detail than most humans. When there is a change to their routine, they resist it. In the long run, they adapt to the new settings, but this long run depends on how much the cat wants to accept ...


5

It sounds like your dog thinks you're trying to play. If you watch dogs (especially young dogs) play with each other, you'll see them bow and twist rapidly, which is probably similar to your stretching. You have a few options: two different approaches to training or the environmental method. Environmental It might be possible for you to just not exercise ...


5

As Stephie and Opcode and Jonathan Wood all said, don't give a kitty a treat for this: treats act as rewards for the kitty herself doing something good, such as letting you comb out a knot or clean her eye, or doing something you personally think is a good idea. (In Skinner-Psychology terms it's reinforcement, part of Operant Conditioning.) It's difficult ...


4

I read through your previous post, and it sounds like the cats are making headway in their potential friendship. A soft paw hit is nothing to worry about. That may even be a sign of play, since they're both pretty young! To answer your question: locking a cat up for "bad behavior" is generally not recommended, because cats will respond negatively ...


4

It would be completely up to the temperament of your cat whether or not they would accept wearing clothes. In my experience, most cats dislike the sensation of wearing things, but I’ve seen a few “popular” cats on Instagram that regularly wear coats. If I were going to train my cat, I’d treat it like the harness training I did (be prepared, this may take ...


4

Yes, your dog learned that inside your home is the correct place to go potty. The reason why she assumes that is irrelevant. You must tell her in a language she can understand that she is not correct. Since her behavior is very predictable, you need to keep watching her constantly from the moment she enters your house to the moment she squats down to poo. ...


4

The FIRST thing I would be concerned about is getting an Australian Shepherd (mini or not) when living in an apartment and having to leave the dog alone for several hours each day. Are you experienced with this particular breed? If not, please reconsider your choice of dog breed. This is a recipe for disaster and neither you nor your dog will be happy. ...


4

Honestly, this sounds like every puppy / adolescent dog I've ever known. Just like human babies, young dogs explore their environment with their mouth. Children eventually grow into exploring with their hands, then with their eyes, but dogs don't have agile hands and keep taking things into their mouths for longer. I've never known a puppy that didn't ...


4

Yes, it is realistically possible, not only hypothetically. Research was done (I do not have ready any link) and it was proved that dogs can learn more than a few hundred words - and their meaning too. In our family, my dog (unusually big Pekinese) surely understands the meaning of the words for the following categories: names of the people in our family (...


4

Is this normal for puppies? In general, yes. He found something exciting and you were trying to steal it from him. He tried to defend his toy/food. It can also be that he was the biggest or bravest puppy of the litter and managed to push his litter mates aside to secure the most food for himself. That taught him that resource guarding is a very rewarding ...


3

Short answer: you go outside with your dog so he can go to the toilet. It doesn't matter whether you live on the 16th or 1st floor. Long answer: I would start training to pee/poo outside as soon as possible. Those pads are great to avoid a mess at home, but they teach the dog that it's ok to pee/poo inside the house. A puppy doesn't have complete control ...


3

In general, dogs don't have the mental capacity to connect a reward to any action that happened more than a few seconds ago. If you wanted to teach her a command, you'd have to reward it immediately within a second or two. However, dogs can learn that certain situations involve treats more often than usual. Some owners give their dogs a treat at the end of a ...


3

First off, you're working under a completely wrong assumption: that sucking milk from a teat or a bottle is less work for the tongue than lapping up water from a bowl. Puppies don't have the muscles necessary to suck from a nipple in their lips. Instead, they curl their tongue around the nipple in a U-shape and suck the liquid with their tongue, as opposed ...


3

What you want to do is slowly acclimate them to your presence, start putting out food in a specific place and a specific time, if you haven't already been doing that, and choose a place somewhat nearby but not too close to that spot and sit there when you feed then, slowly move these places closer together until they are comfortable with you being next to ...


3

From what I have heard/read, a lot of dogs can take some time to get used to their new surroundings. That might be one of the causes. But on the other hand, it might be similar as with people. Some people might be couch potatoes at home, just to become football players, bungee jumpers, car drifters etc. as soon as they are outside. The difference between ...


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