67

I wouldn’t start giving treats for small accidents - what kind of behavior are you trying to reinforce? The cat won’t understand the concept of an “apology” via treats. And if careless weaving results in treats, kitty may end up with receiving more kicks trying to elicit treats from the human who is stumbling to the bathroom at night. My preferred way to ...


54

Punishment rarely works because cats don't have a social structure that recognizes you as the dominant being in the home, they only understand that you're doing something to them that they don't want (squirting them with water, for example). Therefore, it's much more effective to figure out why your cat is exhibiting the undesireable behavior and meet those ...


48

We had the same problem with our cat. Here's how I solved it (and @Nova did too, once). When he first came to live with us, he was fed in the morning when I got up and left the bedroom. But one day he became emboldened, and he decided he’d be fed when he wanted to be fed, which was earlier than my regular wake-up time. Accordingly, he’d wake me up to ...


46

I don't think there are many animals that understand the concept of apology, as a high level concept as such, except for maybe some other advanced primates. MAYBE elephants, dolphins, whales or belugas. But an apology has fundamental parts which you can communicate. Every animal genus has its own language (some are universal). What you would want to ...


33

This is hard to answer. I think you will have to do some experiments. If your cat has a toy or object he likes, you might try to put this outside your door so he can smell his own scent to make him recognize he is at home. Cats in general do know their area by sight and by scent, There are many examples of cats living in an multi-apartment building and not ...


31

I use the squirt bottle technique, a little squirt of water doesn't hurt them, but it discourages the behaviour. However, maybe it's just that my cats are especially intractable, but it's usually a short-term dissuasion in my experience. Just make sure that they don't see you squirt them, it may affect their reaction.


29

We had a cat that wasn't too bright and didn't get the idea of the catflap. We eventually grabbed him and pushed him back and forth through the catflap a few times, then it seemed to get through to him.


24

I researched this awhile back when adopting kittens. It seems there are a lot of variables with cat biting. These are some tactics that I've had successful experience with (in slightly different situations): If the cat was biting as a sign of play (your fingers, arm, etc. is like a toy) then ignoring the cat is recommended. First, play with the cat (Never ...


23

You need to break the existing conditioning your cat has at the moment. The classic approach would be to close the door and immediately open it again. Then slowly increase the time that the cat will accept the closed door. Make sure you always open the door before he starts to fuss and complain and by all means before he freaks out - or you’ll likely start ...


22

The first step for a responsible pet owner when their pet exhibits a significant change (such as described here) is to take the animal to the vet to make sure that there are no health problems. Health problems can cause litter box issues in several ways. A cat with urinary pain (an infection or stones anywhere in the system) will associate that pain with ...


21

I find most cats are pretty easy to train to a sound. It could be a finger snap, the squirt of a spray bottle, a clap of the hands, etc. The key is to be consistent about it, and only use the sound when they're actually being bad. In addition, try not to let them associate the sound with you, or they'll only be good when you're around. Initial training is ...


21

Because the dog is so young, I think it is very likely you can slowly accustom her to urban walking. I think a natural response when you see a small dog cowering or wimpering in fear is to console them, or pet them. This is not an effective way to dissuade fear. It is better to ignore your dog and not feed into its fearful emotions. [see below] I think ...


21

Look who figured out how to get attention from you! And judging by him making you post here, he's done a fine job of it. Face it, your dog has outsmarted you. Happens to me almost daily. ;-) As you have already figured out, he's doing it to get your attention, and he's succeeding because you go chasing after him, right? Time to outsmart your dog! Find an ...


21

Your cat is scared to use the catflap because it is a dangerous situation where it can get attacked by other animals, cats needs to see but not to be seen. Putting up some flowerpots and large plants outside your door will often make your cat feel safer, the thing here is to make a shielded area outside your door where your cat can be safe from imagined or ...


20

A trick I did was to grab and hold my cats close if they disturbed me during the night. They didn't like it, but it was not painful. In order to avoid it, they leave me alone when sleeping.


20

He gets lonely after losing his companion. Attention seeking adventures on your desk help him a lot. Every kind of attention you give a cat is attention. The cat gets noticed. Be it just a lifting off the desk or whatever, he gets what he came looking for. When you know you are going to work at the desk, start by playing with your cat first. After a healthy ...


20

Our cat was not thrilled to go into the box either (it was less severe than you, though). As soon as she felt that something was wrong she would run for her life under the bed and good luck getting her out of there. We did two things: we broke the routine of closing her somewhere and sneaking in with the box we put the box right in the middle of the living ...


19

You can't expect your pet to keep mum if you are not with him. Solutions: Get the dog someone to give him company. When there is no one at home, you can consider leaving him at some neighbors home awhile. You can request somebody to look after him while everybody has gone from your house. You can provide him something to play with. This is not very ...


19

We used to hang a bell on a low branch that would ring when the cat started to climb the tree. We called it the "cat alarm." When it would ring, we would come and get the cat out of the tree right away. Whether or not your cat will eventually get discouraged from climbing the tree is up to your cat. :) The other thing we did was we cut out a three foot ...


19

As background, my husband has a similar electronics hobby and I sew. We lived in a house where we did our hobbies in the living room for a few years, but eventually moved into a house large enough that we each have a 'hobby room' and can shut the door to keep the cats out. I honestly believe this is the best long term solution. While we lived in our small ...


19

Violent punishment is never a solution for dogs that run away. They combine the punishment with coming back and not with running away. (Violent punishment is never a solution at all!) The only solution is to do basic dog training. Start with obedience training with leash on. Train to watch you by command and to sit down. Then lengthen the leash so that ...


19

A very good answer there but there are ways to help your dog enjoy a walk, especially with the others. First, understand that a stray dog is very different from dog raised home from a puppy. At a basic level, a dog is like a wolf(an ancestor) but unfortunately, due to centuries of human contacts, not as efficient. A stray dog’s survival is based on his ...


18

I'm not a professional trainer, but training is what I would do if faced with such a condition: Take the cat into my lap while the dog is watching and caress him (the cat) to make it clear to my dog: he's one of us. Opposite direction: when the dog bites the cat's tail, yell at him to stop. If he repeats it many times, say "bad dog" and ignore him for few ...


18

I'm sorry to tell you that, but your approach is wrong. That's not how you train separation and independence with your dog. What you currently do is training a command. You say a specific word, your dog does what is expected of her and she gets a reward. There is a clearly defined beginning (the word) and a clearly defined ending (getting a reward). Most ...


17

Ultimately positive praise, reward, and repetition are the keys. When taking him out after meals, try to direct your dog to the particular area in which you would like him to relieve himself. You will have to stay with him and try to encourage him to remain in that area until he goes. Once he does, provide him with positive praise and rewarding him (food ...


17

"Crating" a dog is putting a dog in a crate with the door closed for whatever reason. The major benefit of using a crate with a young puppy is to prevent the puppy from learning bad habits when it is not being closely supervised. A puppy that is confined to its crate will not be peeing on the floor or chewing up your shoes. It also teaches the pup to settle ...


17

No, corporal punishment is not an effective training method. Hiby et al reviewed dog training results, but included corporal punishment under the broader category of punishment based training (including yelling at the dog and putting him out) and concluded Overall, our results suggest that punishment-based training is not effective at reducing the ...


17

Punishing him by locking him in a cage is NOT the answer. In fact, punishment when it comes to litter-training issues in general is counterproductive, but locking the poor mite in a cage is just plain cruel. Assuming there are no medical issues going on (and it doesn't sound like there are, as you say you've had him checked over) then you just need to ...


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