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13

As long as she doesn't destroy the rope, I wouldn't worry. Traditional rope toys are made of cotton or a comparable natural fiber because they are intended to be chewed on and ingested in small amounts. As long as you only play tug of war or the dog only carries it around, they are no problem. The problem arises when the dog actually chews through strands of ...


7

Does she actually obviously damage this rope toy? You say in a comment that she destroyed a different rope toy (that had a ball attached), but if she doesn't show any signs of causing damage to this specific rope toy then she's unlikely to wake up one morning and immediately rip it to a dangerous state. You should monitor it for wear over time and be ready ...


5

I actually disagree with Elmy here. If your dog could swallow a large chunk of the rope, they may choke and die. To prevent this, I would consider: getting a tougher toy/rope that your dog won't be able to destroy; keeping your dog under more supervision; buying alternative toys so you can take the said toy away when you aren't watching your dog and ...


3

It depends on the intelligence of the cat Some cats understand that the red dot does not really exist. They just like to play whack-a-mole with it, finding it better than rolling inanimate objects themselves and chasing them. However, some of them get fixated by it and cannot function properly after a play session. My friend had two cats, one being very ...


3

Dried skins (I assume most of them are cow skins) seem to be a good alternative. They start out quite hard and stiff, but get softer when sufficiently drenched in saliva ;-). "Soft" being a relative term here, they are still resilient like leather. Other alternatives are dried pig ears, dried tendons or other unprocessed, dried animal cutoffs. The ...


2

The older cat might just let the younger play alone since essentially, playing is hunting practice for cats, and it might think the younger one needs the practice more. We are currently observing something similar with our two older ones, they will mostly let the younger one play and observe, and only occasionally spring into action. If they do, they do not ...


2

We have 2 African greys, about 25 and 20 years. We have found "a busy beak is a happy beak". They love to tear things apart, never had a problem with splinters. Their favorite is chicken leg bones, they turn them into sawdust getting the marrow. Chicken bones are probably too big for cockatiels.


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