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8

We have a lot of ticks in the South-West Finland and so I have been removing ticks from our dogs on regular basis every spring. We never seem to treat the dogs with tick repellent early enough. To remove ticks I have used normal tweezers, special "tick-tweezers", bare fingernails and a tick lasso. So far the absolutely best device for removing ticks has ...


8

Firstly, it's probably worth understanding how each of them works and the upsides to them... Oral Typically work by ingestion. In other words the parasite takes a bite, as it were, and poisons itself. No issue with substance transferring to you or a child, not all people react well to topical medications, including babies. Some options are more or less ...


7

Oh yes, ticks are quite an issue for dogs. Some diseases that may be transmitted by ticks include: Canine babesiois Rocky mountain spotted fever Canine monocytic ehrlichiosis Cyclic thrombocytopenia Granulocytic anaplasmosis Lyme disease American canine hepatozoonosis Canine hepatozoonosis Tick paralysis Many of these associated issues may also effect ...


5

According the Blackwell's Five-Minute Veterinary Consult: Canine and Feline the process is to grasp the tick as close to the skin as possible with tweezers and gently pull free. So, I would wear disposable gloves and using blunt-tipped tweezers (to protect the skin of the dog), gently grasp the tick body and gently pull in the opposite direction of the ...


5

It appears as though flea and tick treatment is effective on dogs with all hair types, despite the differences in oil production, as long as the product is applied correctly. From Bioactivation in Fleas: [Flea and Tick removal] products move through the oily coating of the dog or cat’s hair and skin in exactly the same way in long and short-haired breeds....


4

When using a tool, should you twist or not twist? It depends on the tool. The CDC offers these great guidelines for tick removal with tweezers. How to remove a tick Use fine-tipped tweezers to grasp the tick as close to the skin's surface as possible. Pull upward with steady, even pressure. Don't twist or jerk the tick; this can cause the mouth-parts to ...


4

Side note: Im in the woods with my 8 year old Yella Lab every morning at sunup for an hour. We used to use one of those topical tick/flea oils, but switched to Trifexis about 5 years ago, because he's a swimmer. Tick checks daily. With the oils, I pulled a little more than 2 ticks a week off him. Since the switch, it's less than half that. A few times ...


4

This is a domestic rabbit, it was someone's pet it, has been released in the wild to die a long painful death. Even in areas where the European rabbit are native, if it looks domestic, it is a released pet. The 'pustules' are difficult to see clearly in the image, but the one on the ear may be a tick. The rabbit needs urgent medical attention, if you can ...


3

This may not be the answer your looking for, but... And also I'm not an expert, it just might help... There is no proper use of the collar( and they have strict and clear limitations), other than the one put up by the producer(typically: change it often, keep away any tempering agent e.g. water, dirt, shampoo). The way a collar works is by emanating an odor ...


3

So, ticks can carry all kinds of bacteria and disease, but the most prevalent, commonly heard of and one of the scariest is Lyme disease. Although Lyme disease can take 2-5 months before physical detection in dogs, it's rate of spreading and infection is perplexing to even most scientists and veterinarians. A dog with no prevention, can be bitten with a ...


3

If you do not have access to a veterinarian to remove the ticks or are not able to remove them yourself I would suggest getting a veterinary approved tick preventative: Bravecto Advantix Nexgard Keep in mind once the ticks are done feasting they will fall off on their own, your dog will most likely shake them out as they have a hard time moving once ...


3

I contacted Merial with your question and this is what the response was. Thank you for your email regarding FRONTLINE© Combo. In answer to your question, following application as directed, FRONTLINE® Combo rapidly dissolves in the lipid(fat)-rich structures of the skin. It then spreads to all areas of the body surface by diffusion along a concentration ...


3

He's likely anxious because he doesn't know what is going on. He might also be taking his cues from you if you are worrying while removing them. Keep breathing. Talk to him in a reassuring voice. Take breaks in between removals. Give him affection (rather than treats) and move slowly. Check him thoroughly all over - there's nowhere they won't settle in for a ...


3

I have a pure breed German Shepard who is very active and loves being outside, and ticks are an inevitable consequence that comes with it. To start with the tick you saw is probably a female dog tick and her color was most likely darker because she was filled with blood. Pulling these kind of ticks is the best thing to do. However, as you might have ...


3

Manual removal is best, because it also allows you to clean/disinfect the wounds with isopropyl alcohol (or other disinfectant). If she doesn't sit still for you to remove all of the ticks at once, you can try just pulling off one or two at a time, then giving her a break (petting her, giving her treats, playing a game, etc) before pulling off another tick ...


2

First, understand that Hartz sells a variety of different products with several different active ingredients. Searching the National Pesticide Information Retrieval System for Hartz Mountain Company reveals that the company uses the following pesticides in their products (I sorted them by insecticide class): Synergists with Pyrethroids N-Octyl ...


2

I'm not sure this is what you are looking for, but two brands of oral anti-tick/flea medicine for dogs are: Capstar Flea Killer - contains Nitenpyram Comfortis - contains Spinosad Nitenpyram on Wikipedia: Nitenpyram is an insecticide used in agriculture and veterinary medicine to kill external parasites of pets. It is a neonicotinoid, a neurotoxin that ...


2

Yes and No. Revolution (Selamectin) controls tick infestations only due to the American Dog Tick (Dermacentor variabilis), a tick commonly found on dogs. There are other common species of ticks that are not killed or controlled by REVOLUTION. Your veterinarian can recommend appropriate products to control or kill ticks common to your area. Source But... ...


2

Not sure if your able to get NexGard where you live. "Afoxolaner enters the blood stream and does not penetrate to the surrounding tissues so fleas and ticks DO need to bite your pet to be affected by the medication. Fleas are typically killed within several hours, while ticks are killed within 1-2 days. It is important to note that Nexgard does not ...


2

I do not think you need to worry,the blood is from your dog and it is mixed with an anti coagulant the ticks produce to keep the blood flowing so the tick can feed on the blood. The danger with ticks is they can transfer illness to your dog so the best you can do now is to keep an eye on your dog to see if there is swelling around the bite area,and to keep ...


2

There are several different ways to get rid of ticks: Flea / tick collars They smell bad and have to be replaced regularly (I think once a year for most products), but they are an inexpensive way to keep ticks away from your dog. Ask your vet or buy one online, but make sure it repels ticks as well as fleas. Garlic Garlic repels ticks by its smell and ...


1

First of all: don't worry. The constant eye contact etc. Is just some instinctive reaction, as the dog most likely isn't sure on why the whole thing happened. As mentioned in the other reply, stay calm and continue as usual. As soon as the dog realizes it's no longer happening this should change again. Next time, try to be a bit more careful and "worst ...


1

Yes animals remember negative experiences more than positive ones. Mine does. However they also have a great capacity for love, affection and dogs especially love human companionship. Your dog may remember or not remember. There really isn't anything you can do to change that except be kind and remain normal with his with routines, play time, feeding time ...


1

Can only speak for dogs and cats, but it's basically the same: Remove them physically. (Just check after there was a chance to pick some up and possibly 1-2 hours later.) Get a flea comb to remove loose ticks from the fur and a tick hook to safely remove feeding ticks. I prefer tools to pull (and optionally twist) rather than pliers as it's far less likely ...


1

Just to follow up for anyone else looking to cure a puppy from ticks. Since most tick repellents could have adverse effects on a puppy it might be a good idea to use a topical agent such as diatomaceous earth. Check out this fact sheet and this article by Dr.Axe


1

You need to apply flea/tick treatment to skin and I suggest Frontline plus every one month FRONTLINE Plus has 2 secret weapons: fipronil and (S)-methoprene. Once FRONTLINE Plus is applied, this combo stores itself in the oil glands in your pet's skin. It then self-distributes continuously for 1 month to your pet's hair and skin through the hair ...


1

The name of the drug is Bravecto The active ingredient is Furalaner. Here is it's safety study. It enters the bloodstream and has efficacy for up to 8 weeks. Ticks that consume the blood of the host ingest by proxy the insecticide which effects their respiratory system Here is the FDA application for approval from May 15, 2014.


1

That's a judgement call. They may be indoor-only critters, but you aren't, and your guests aren't, and it's not impossible for fleas or ticks to be carried indoors on you or your clothing... just as a mosquito carrying a disease might get through an open door or your screens. On the other hand, some of the treatments may put some minor stress on the cats' ...


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