25

TLDR: Not really. While the risk is low - COVID-19 seems to be fairly indiscriminate, with documented cases of dogs, cats, zoo otters and farmed minks getting it. Most corona virus (There's a whole family of similar viruses like SARS and MERS) outbreaks are pretty certainly zoonotic (they come from animals in the first place), so extra caution is a good idea....


6

Advice from the UK government is similar to that of the CDC mentioned by Journeyman Geek (emphasis mine): If you, or a member of your household, have symptoms of coronavirus (COVID-19) you should self-isolate for 10 days. If you’re self-isolating you should make alternative arrangements to take care of your animal’s welfare. You should ask for support from ...


5

There are two possible scenarios: Not everyone in your household is infected with COVID. In this case the cats could serve as vectors for the virus to spread to other members of your family so you should avoid contact with them and have other members of your family treat them as infected just in case. This means always wearing a mask around your cat or when ...


3

Maybe. I think it's only for you to discern. How old is the eldest person the cat, or those around it, will come into contact within the next 14 days? If you, your wife, and everyone else is well under 65 years old, you are safe (statistically, nothing is 100%) to be with your cat. This doesn't preclude your cat carrying the disease and infecting others in ...


2

It is SAFE for your cat and there is no evidence that would suggest otherwise. According to www.scmp.com: “Samples collected from the cat and the dog by the department tested positive for the Covid-19 virus. However, neither of the animals has shown any symptoms at present. The AFCD will continue to closely monitor them and conduct repeated testing.” Now, ...


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