25

TLDR: Not really. While the risk is low - COVID-19 seems to be fairly indiscriminate, with documented cases of dogs, cats, zoo otters and farmed minks getting it. Most corona virus (There's a whole family of similar viruses like SARS and MERS) outbreaks are pretty certainly zoonotic (they come from animals in the first place), so extra caution is a good idea....


9

I've had cats which have been moved to a new home, both at my parents' place and my own. What we do is keep them inside for at least a week to get them used to the new house as their home, and also to get used to the idea that that's where their people are. After a week, if they seem comfortable in their new surroundings, let them out supervised for a small ...


9

I'm not sure how breed affects the range of a cat, but food source (if the cat is provided food by owners, or if the cat has to hunt food) is known to affect how far a cat may travel. A study by in 2011 performed by the University of Illinois using radio collars determined: The mean home range for pet cats in the study was less than two hectares (4.9 acres)....


9

I don't have direct experience with bettas, but I've never heard that pairs will work long-term in any male/female combination. There's research that suggests they prefer to be alone or in large groups, rather than with one other fish. From Social partner preferences of male and female fighting fish (Betta splendens), by J.L. Snekser, S.P. McRobert, and E.D. ...


7

Rabbits mark their territory using scent gland located under chin. Male rabbits, or bucks in particular, will often rub their chin on anything they consider theirs. This is referred to as chinning. Rabbits will do this to define territory boundaries. In addition, rabbits will spray their territory. Bucks and Does are both capable of spraying; however, bucks ...


7

You can get battery-operated, electronic cat-flaps that will only unlock if they detect recognised microchips. This is a convenient method to control access if your cats have been microchipped. The SureFlap is one such cat flap. We have one, and it works as advertised. You can also get tags with a built-in microchip that can be attached to a collar, but ...


6

Growing up we always had outdoor cats and moved every 2-3 years - which is a lot for a cat. Our oldest moggy lived until 17 so she saw a fair number of houses with us but was ultimately an outdoor cat. Whilst she had access to the house with a cat flap, she usually only came in for meals or if it was super cold. She had a bed in a covered house outside as ...


6

While 4 litter boxes for three cats should in theory be sufficient, it may be beneficial to temporarily add some extra litter boxes. I suspect that Izze is avoiding the litter boxes because he is afraid of being ambushed; so an uncovered litter box that allows him to see his surroundings may be best. You might consider feeding Peaches in a separate room so ...


6

Separate them, quarantine the new cat in a limited area (one room, eg) and re-introduce gradually. There are good resources on the web for this, including at least one YouTube video series spanning several weeks and explaining what the cats' interactions and body language are saying about their progress in tolerating/trusting each other. Note that it may ...


6

Advice from the UK government is similar to that of the CDC mentioned by Journeyman Geek (emphasis mine): If you, or a member of your household, have symptoms of coronavirus (COVID-19) you should self-isolate for 10 days. If you’re self-isolating you should make alternative arrangements to take care of your animal’s welfare. You should ask for support from ...


5

Pet Rabbits are often referred to as house rabbits. They are from the general Domestic rabbit stock that trace their origins to the European rabbit or common rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) native to southwestern Europe (Spain and Portugal) and northwest Africa (Morocco and Algeria). In the wild these rabbits live in underground warrens, in small groups. ...


5

There are two possible scenarios: Not everyone in your household is infected with COVID. In this case the cats could serve as vectors for the virus to spread to other members of your family so you should avoid contact with them and have other members of your family treat them as infected just in case. This means always wearing a mask around your cat or when ...


4

You are correct that the first and best step to modify spraying and poor litter box habits is spay/neuter. You are also correct that the behavior your are seeing is likely related to territory marking. Every bunny likes to be secure in the ownership of their space. The scenario you mention is not unusual, but there is not one simple thing you can do to ...


4

I don't know if this can be seen as an answer, but here goes. This happened in the mid 80s. My neutered male cat, Mons, did come home with a small female cat when I was a teen. I used to let my cat in by opening my window. My cat refused to let me close the window. He made a lot of noise and called out loud. The female cat jumped inside through the open ...


4

T'Challa is a tomcat and therefore a competitor for territory and females. Pepe is just defending his territory. Tomcats are generally more territorial than females and protect their territory more aggressively. It could also be that Pepe and T'Challa met before and had a fight. Pepe remembers the cat and the fight and prepares himself for another fight.


3

The stains look like urine. Rabbits and guinea pigs can be great friends, I doubt the relationship has any bearing on the behavior. You don't need to change anything between them. Dark colored urine in rabbits is not unusual; it can vary from a light pink to a dark brown. A sudden change to dark color is grounds for a visit to the vet. Long term dark ...


3

A more likely issue is that the mother will beat the hell out of the boy for being in the neighborhood of the kittens. In general, male cats aren't lions and aren't as territorial about little kittens.


3

There are indeed dogs that are kept specifically for this behaviour. Their job is to act as an alarm and deterrent. In cultures where dogs are routinely kept chained up or penned in small enclosures, that's what they are kept for: to keep people from entering the property and provide an alarm if there's a risk that they will do so. It's not a happy ...


3

Unless you're willing to keep him under control, I'm afraid you'll just have to let the cats work out who defers to whom. The good news is that most of the noise and posturing is just that; it rarely takes more than a brief tussle to decide who's boss, and it's mostly threat rather than serious fighting. "So's your mama!" "You want some of this? Well?" "I'm ...


3

Elliott will probably come home, if you can convince him that indoors is part of he's territory again rather than having been taken over by dome interloper. He may take some persuading, including giving the other cat's scent marks time to fade, letting him explore the whole house to see she really isn't hiding anywhere, and possibly trapping him indoors for ...


2

It might be that the oldest cat is feeling the years a bit and doesn't feel able to jump up there. Do you have some platform or steps you can use as an aid? If it is because of the presence of the young cat without the other two that causes the difference, maybe if you made a separate area on the bed that is easier to claim than the whole surface. You ...


2

There's a few things you can try to get the coexisting. 1) Put one in a carrier and let the other walk around it and sniff it, then switch who is in the carrier and who is walking around. 2) Take a blanket from each of them and put it in the same space as the opposing cat. This will get them a bit used to the smell of the other. 3) There's sprays that ...


2

I'm not a bunny expert at all, but I've only done so much research recently because I'm looking to get one. Possibly, if you try to let it out while the cats are near, but not too close. You need two people or more, for this yourself and another person pet and give both the bunny and cats a treat while they notice each other. Just reward good behavior. In ...


2

This may be the reason for his opened mouth (smelling something), and you pulling him away in such a new confusing event for him may just get him stressed more and so swat at them. The mother knows if he's a threat and will beat him down to ground if he wanted to hurt them. He may swat at them just because he isn't sure what they are yet, and if the mother ...


2

Your dog is not running away, he is visiting all of his friends. If there is a risk of him getting run over by cars, abused by strangers, mingling with diseased dogs (eg, mange), or tangling with hostile wildlife, you may want to re-design his yard-space so that he cannot escape anymore. As your dog is prone to wander, please make sure that he is ...


2

Do not actively help the cat. Clapping or chasing can lead to aggression as both parties are surprised. As it sounds, there is easy access to your living room. Your cat probably considers this to be her home territory (as opposed to hunting range or wander territory) and will aggressively defend it. Perhaps better option in this case is restricting other ...


2

Simple answer: If your dogs are properly socialized, just let them figure that out on their own. If it isn't a problem now, it shouldn't be one later on. If one prefers a specific place, it will try to get and keep it.


2

The cat series that Mhwombat is talking about is wonderful. Jackson, the owner of Cat from Hell, suggests shelving, trees, bookcases or anything else that a cat can hide in or around and still get from Point A to Point B and allow them to feel safe. In my house we have a cat tree, followed by a Bay window the cats jump into then some open sided bookcases ...


2

'Anywhere' is basically ok. But when you do maintenance it is of course easier if it is not directly against the glass. I usually keep enough space between decoration and the glass that I can easily fit my hand or a scrubber between it. Overtime there is indeed a possibility that some waste will build up, but as long as you're not overfeeding the fish and ...


2

Maybe. I think it's only for you to discern. How old is the eldest person the cat, or those around it, will come into contact within the next 14 days? If you, your wife, and everyone else is well under 65 years old, you are safe (statistically, nothing is 100%) to be with your cat. This doesn't preclude your cat carrying the disease and infecting others in ...


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