13

There are two basic types of substrates for bearded dragons, there are benefits and downsides to both, and it comes down to what you feel is safe for your bearded dragon, and what you feel you can manage for cleaning. In short, particle substrates allow the bearded dragon to dig, which is something they do enjoy doing, but gives a risk of impaction from ...


7

Ideally you should spot clean daily (removing uneaten bits of food, etc.). Deep cleans (taking everything out, rinsing it off, replacing substrate, etc.) should be done about twice a year. That being said, sometimes your crabs have different ideas. If one or more of them is down for a molt when you want to clean, I wouldn't worry about it too much. Just ...


7

The exact details of the environment and requirements will vary from species to species, reflecting the different sizes, natures and natural habitats of the different kinds of snakes, but the principles of keeping any snake are very similar. The underlying principle, as with keeping any animal, is of course to put its health and welfare first, so that you ...


6

To answer your question, it is a little of both. The reason hot rocks are frowned upon more than UTHs and basking lights is because they fail to spread heat as much as the previous. To feel the effects of the warmth, the animal will need to sit directly on the rock. Since reptiles dont have the nervous system we do as humans, it is harder for them to tell ...


5

One thing to consider first before having an outline of a turtle's enclosure is its natural habitat. Some turtles, like softshell turtles, have evolved to be burrowers and should be supplied with a fine substrate that encourages their natural behaviour. Others may live in muddy environments, and make use of that, but do not need it to thrive (like red ear ...


4

I've found that with a properly set up terrarium, the substrate shouldn't come into contact with the water, so the only decomposing matter in the water should be the crab's molted shells. Since my terrarium is 30 gallons, and it's only used for molting, I've elected to change the water about once a month. I also put a pinch of aquarium salt into the water ...


4

Swifts are primarily insectivores, so they wont be nibbling on your plants. But as a practical consideration, swifts are both avid climbers and burrowers, so it would be quite challenging to find a live plant (and a substrate to contain it) that will hold up to the constant climbing and uprooting that the plant will experience in that smaller space. For ...


4

I've personally had this problem with my turtle when I moved him to a tank during a storm, he's been outside alone in his outdoor enclosure with no reflection so he didn't react the best he could to his reflection. He wasn't particularly aggressive, but he did occasionally run into the glass and it probably was stressing him out. The first thing you do is ...


4

Disclaimer, I linked a few example products. These were the first items I found, I do not own or sell these specific products, or am in any way affiliated with them. There are roughly four ways to heat your tank: Heat lamp. Has a few problems, one of which is that it suck humidity from the air, but also an aesthetic one. If you are regulating the ...


4

A few options at hand: 1) Increase the temperature of your room, can use your regular home heating system, space heaters (do not use unsupervised) etc.. 2) Use hot water bottles (wrapped in a towel to prevent thermal burns) 3) Place tank in a room with lots of natural sunlight beaming through the windows, you can try to place part of the tank in direct ...


3

You might try some of the 40-hour heat packs used for shipping reptiles, which you can get in a pet store or online; you would still have to buy it, but they are not very expensive. Using a floor vent heater in the room is a good idea if the house is cold, but it's a dangerous and tricky game to have it blow right on the tank as a primary heat source-- ...


3

Ideally your snail-neglecting roommate would have gotten a low wattage heating mat (similar to this one) for their tank. You may or may not be up for spending ~$15 on one. If you do get a heating mat you'll want to stick it to the side of the tank, and not put it underneath as snails burrow in response to overheating. You'll also need a way to monitor the ...


3

I just wouldn't use the scouring brush, it's meant to be abrasive in order to scrub baked on food off pots and pans so it's a bit overkill in my opinion. Here is my cleaning routine for my bearded dragon's tank, I can't imagine that it wouldn't work for you, since the temperatures in my tank will be about the same as yours if not a little bit hotter. Step ...


3

Since the previous answer was so thorough about snake care, I'm just going to focus on what kind of snake is best for a beginner and where to get one! General agreement is that the best beginner snakes in terms of manageable size, temperament, low cost, ease/cost of providing an appropriate habitat, and lack of feeding issues are: corn snake, California ...


3

I have found ground up corn cob (dried) that I found at bimart in the bird section to be a great substrate for my bearded dragons cage. ( I have a open cage wood and chicken wire wrap so air is always circulating. ) its easy clean up cause it acts like kitty little absorbs smells well. When wet it plums up and disolves ( i tried it popped a few in my mouth ...


3

It depends on what you want to have in your tank. If you are housing fish that need a very high pH (cichlids), then it might work. All other fish will probably suffer because the shells are either too sharp or because the pH will become too high. Most people are even trying to lower their pH so adding egg shells will definitely not help with that.


3

Short answer: Not really, because it all depends on the reptile and how active the species is. Basically, there are going to be two options for the type of terrarium you would use. Long or tall. A long terrarium is one that's going to be wider than it is tall. Those are the ones that look like fish aquariums (although the glass is thinner than an aquarium)....


2

Natural sunlight is the best source for reptiles to obtain D3 however for indoor tortoises you can use artificial uv lighting. Mercury vapour bulbs are ideal as they pump out a ton of uvb and can be used as basking lights (lots of heat). Taking your tortoise outside for 30mins a day is very beneficial (though the more the better), I would do this on top of ...


1

American green tree frogs stay relatively small. I would say you could go with a relatively small tank. 5 gallon would work but a 10 gallon would be ideal more than likely. The standard 10 gallon tanks are around the specifications that you listed in your question. You'll know if the little guy is stressed out. These are what I sell at the pet shop I work at....


1

According to this website, Tortoises synthesise their own vitamin D3 from the UV component of sunlight. Vitamin D3 is essential for the effective metabolism of dietary calcium in reptiles. ... Carnivorous and omnivorous reptiles get a high proportion of their vitamin D3 requirement from their food, however, plants do not contain D3, ...


1

Technically hot water would be enough to clean the bowl, but not really sanitize it. Unless we're talking about boiling hot water. It also might be a bit different with snakes, but my lizards defecate in their water dish all the time. So I want to keep their bowl sanitary if they're also going to drink out of it. Personally I use dish soap, but I also have ...


1

Wouldn't worry about it and just try it. Considering it's still water (no sprinkler or any other movement) it should be fine, especially short term, without causing any significant and global change. I assume you've got some humidity meter? Is so, just try and see how/if conditions change. Either way it will also depend heavily on your actual terrarium. ...


1

The way to do this is to cut back the oldest leaves if it is possible,This depends on the type of plant you have. If this is impossible to do you have to rinse it in cold water and fully submerge the plant for about 15 minutes. You will need to remove the soil from the roots of your plant and replace it with a 50/50 mix of sand and unfertilized soil. A ...


1

A better option is diatomaceous earth. It's crushed seashells; you can buy it at any pool supply store and it's non-toxic and super fine. I have used it many times. I even put it on my dogs and on their bedding. It can even be used in fish tanks, it's all natural and non-toxic. I would check into that. As far as the egg shells, I'm not sure about that one. ...


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